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  • 1
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Brandeker, Alexis -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Mar 28;343(6178):1440-1. doi: 10.1126/science.1251123.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm, 106 91 Sweden.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24675942" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-10-06
    Description: Some planetary systems harbour debris disks containing planetesimals such as asteroids and comets. Collisions between such bodies produce small dust particles, the spectral features of which reveal their composition and, hence, that of their parent bodies. A measurement of the composition of olivine crystals (Mg(2-2x)Fe(2x)SiO(4)) has been done for the protoplanetary disk HD 100546 (refs 3, 4) and for olivine crystals in the warm inner parts of planetary systems. The latter compares well with the iron-rich olivine in asteroids (x approximately 0.29). In the cold outskirts of the beta Pictoris system, an analogue to the young Solar System, olivine crystals were detected but their composition remained undetermined, leaving unknown how the composition of the bulk of Solar System cometary olivine grains compares with that of extrasolar comets. Here we report the detection of the 69-micrometre-wavelength band of olivine crystals in the spectrum of beta Pictoris. Because the disk is optically thin, we can associate the crystals with an extrasolar proto-Kuiper belt a distance of 15-45 astronomical units from the star (one astronomical unit is the Sun-Earth distance), determine their magnesium-rich composition (x = 0.01 +/- 0.001) and show that they make up 3.6 +/- 1.0 per cent of the total dust mass. These values are strikingly similar to those for the dust emitted by the most primitive comets in the Solar System, even though beta Pictoris is more massive and more luminous and has a different planetary system architecture.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉de Vries, B L -- Acke, B -- Blommaert, J A D L -- Waelkens, C -- Waters, L B F M -- Vandenbussche, B -- Min, M -- Olofsson, G -- Dominik, C -- Decin, L -- Barlow, M J -- Brandeker, A -- Di Francesco, J -- Glauser, A M -- Greaves, J -- Harvey, P M -- Holland, W S -- Ivison, R J -- Liseau, R -- Pantin, E E -- Pilbratt, G L -- Royer, P -- Sibthorpe, B -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):74-6. doi: 10.1038/nature11469.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. bldevries.science@gmail.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23038467" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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