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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-05-28
    Description: A complex interaction of signalling events, including the Wnt pathway, regulates sprouting of blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature during angiogenesis. Here we show that two distinct mutations in the (uro)chordate-specific gumby (also called Fam105b) gene cause an embryonic angiogenic phenotype in gumby mice. Gumby interacts with disheveled 2 (DVL2), is expressed in canonical Wnt-responsive endothelial cells and encodes an ovarian tumour domain class of deubiquitinase that specifically cleaves linear ubiquitin linkages. A crystal structure of gumby in complex with linear diubiquitin reveals how the identified mutations adversely affect substrate binding and catalytic function in line with the severity of their angiogenic phenotypes. Gumby interacts with HOIP (also called RNF31), a key component of the linear ubiquitin assembly complex, and decreases linear ubiquitination and activation of NF-kappaB-dependent transcription. This work provides support for the biological importance of linear (de)ubiquitination in angiogenesis, craniofacial and neural development and in modulating Wnt signalling.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rivkin, Elena -- Almeida, Stephanie M -- Ceccarelli, Derek F -- Juang, Yu-Chi -- MacLean, Teresa A -- Srikumar, Tharan -- Huang, Hao -- Dunham, Wade H -- Fukumura, Ryutaro -- Xie, Gang -- Gondo, Yoichi -- Raught, Brian -- Gingras, Anne-Claude -- Sicheri, Frank -- Cordes, Sabine P -- IHO 94384/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 111199/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 97966/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP119289/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jun 20;498(7454):318-24. doi: 10.1038/nature12296. Epub 2013 May 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mt Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23708998" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism ; Alleles ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Embryo, Mammalian/blood supply/embryology/metabolism ; Endopeptidases/*chemistry/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Neovascularization, Physiologic/genetics ; Phenotype ; Phosphoproteins/metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Ubiquitin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism ; *Ubiquitination ; Wnt Signaling Pathway
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-07-13
    Description: Cell-surface receptors frequently use scaffold proteins to recruit cytoplasmic targets, but the rationale for this is uncertain. Activated receptor tyrosine kinases, for example, engage scaffolds such as Shc1 that contain phosphotyrosine (pTyr)-binding (PTB) domains. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, here we show that mammalian Shc1 responds to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation through multiple waves of distinct phosphorylation events and protein interactions. After stimulation, Shc1 rapidly binds a group of proteins that activate pro-mitogenic or survival pathways dependent on recruitment of the Grb2 adaptor to Shc1 pTyr sites. Akt-mediated feedback phosphorylation of Shc1 Ser 29 then recruits the Ptpn12 tyrosine phosphatase. This is followed by a sub-network of proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, trafficking and signal termination that binds Shc1 with delayed kinetics, largely through the SgK269 pseudokinase/adaptor protein. Ptpn12 acts as a switch to convert Shc1 from pTyr/Grb2-based signalling to SgK269-mediated pathways that regulate cell invasion and morphogenesis. The Shc1 scaffold therefore directs the temporal flow of signalling information after EGF stimulation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zheng, Yong -- Zhang, Cunjie -- Croucher, David R -- Soliman, Mohamed A -- St-Denis, Nicole -- Pasculescu, Adrian -- Taylor, Lorne -- Tate, Stephen A -- Hardy, W Rod -- Colwill, Karen -- Dai, Anna Yue -- Bagshaw, Rick -- Dennis, James W -- Gingras, Anne-Claude -- Daly, Roger J -- Pawson, Tony -- MOP-13466-6849/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jul 11;499(7457):166-71. doi: 10.1038/nature12308.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 1X5, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23846654" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Breast/cytology ; Cell Line ; Epidermal Growth Factor/*metabolism ; Epithelial Cells/cytology ; Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism ; Feedback, Physiological ; GRB2 Adaptor Protein/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes/chemistry/metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Binding ; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism ; Rats ; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor/agonists/metabolism ; Shc Signaling Adaptor Proteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; Time Factors
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-02-26
    Description: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-beta, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bailey, Peter -- Chang, David K -- Nones, Katia -- Johns, Amber L -- Patch, Ann-Marie -- Gingras, Marie-Claude -- Miller, David K -- Christ, Angelika N -- Bruxner, Tim J C -- Quinn, Michael C -- Nourse, Craig -- Murtaugh, L Charles -- Harliwong, Ivon -- Idrisoglu, Senel -- Manning, Suzanne -- Nourbakhsh, Ehsan -- Wani, Shivangi -- Fink, Lynn -- Holmes, Oliver -- Chin, Venessa -- Anderson, Matthew J -- Kazakoff, Stephen -- Leonard, Conrad -- Newell, Felicity -- Waddell, Nick -- Wood, Scott -- Xu, Qinying -- Wilson, Peter J -- Cloonan, Nicole -- Kassahn, Karin S -- Taylor, Darrin -- Quek, Kelly -- Robertson, Alan -- Pantano, Lorena -- Mincarelli, Laura -- Sanchez, Luis N -- Evers, Lisa -- Wu, Jianmin -- Pinese, Mark -- Cowley, Mark J -- Jones, Marc D -- Colvin, Emily K -- Nagrial, Adnan M -- Humphrey, Emily S -- Chantrill, Lorraine A -- Mawson, Amanda -- Humphris, Jeremy -- Chou, Angela -- Pajic, Marina -- Scarlett, Christopher J -- Pinho, Andreia V -- Giry-Laterriere, Marc -- Rooman, Ilse -- Samra, Jaswinder S -- Kench, James G -- Lovell, Jessica A -- Merrett, Neil D -- Toon, Christopher W -- Epari, Krishna -- Nguyen, Nam Q -- Barbour, Andrew -- Zeps, Nikolajs -- Moran-Jones, Kim -- Jamieson, Nigel B -- Graham, Janet S -- Duthie, Fraser -- Oien, Karin -- Hair, Jane -- Grutzmann, Robert -- Maitra, Anirban -- Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A -- Wolfgang, Christopher L -- Morgan, Richard A -- Lawlor, Rita T -- Corbo, Vincenzo -- Bassi, Claudio -- Rusev, Borislav -- Capelli, Paola -- Salvia, Roberto -- Tortora, Giampaolo -- Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata -- Petersen, Gloria M -- Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative -- Munzy, Donna M -- Fisher, William E -- Karim, Saadia A -- Eshleman, James R -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Pilarsky, Christian -- Morton, Jennifer P -- Sansom, Owen J -- Scarpa, Aldo -- Musgrove, Elizabeth A -- Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo -- Hofmann, Oliver -- Sutherland, Robert L -- Wheeler, David A -- Gill, Anthony J -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Pearson, John V -- Waddell, Nicola -- Biankin, Andrew V -- Grimmond, Sean M -- 103721/Z/14/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- A12481/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A18076/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- C29717/A17263/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 3;531(7592):47-52. doi: 10.1038/nature16965. Epub 2016 Feb 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. ; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. ; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. ; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. ; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. ; Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. ; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. ; School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. ; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. ; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. ; School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. ; Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. ; Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. ; School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. ; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. ; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. ; Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. ; GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. ; Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. ; Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. ; The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. ; Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. ; ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. ; Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. ; Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. ; University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26909576" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic ; Ductal/classification/genetics/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; DNA Methylation ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Regulatory Networks ; Genes, Neoplasm/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3-beta/genetics ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3-gamma/genetics ; Histone Demethylases/genetics ; Homeodomain Proteins/genetics ; Humans ; Mice ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*classification/*genetics/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Prognosis ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/genetics ; Survival Analysis ; Trans-Activators/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Transcription, Genetic ; Transcriptome ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-10-30
    Description: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3530898/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3530898/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Biankin, Andrew V -- Waddell, Nicola -- Kassahn, Karin S -- Gingras, Marie-Claude -- Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B -- Johns, Amber L -- Miller, David K -- Wilson, Peter J -- Patch, Ann-Marie -- Wu, Jianmin -- Chang, David K -- Cowley, Mark J -- Gardiner, Brooke B -- Song, Sarah -- Harliwong, Ivon -- Idrisoglu, Senel -- Nourse, Craig -- Nourbakhsh, Ehsan -- Manning, Suzanne -- Wani, Shivangi -- Gongora, Milena -- Pajic, Marina -- Scarlett, Christopher J -- Gill, Anthony J -- Pinho, Andreia V -- Rooman, Ilse -- Anderson, Matthew -- Holmes, Oliver -- Leonard, Conrad -- Taylor, Darrin -- Wood, Scott -- Xu, Qinying -- Nones, Katia -- Fink, J Lynn -- Christ, Angelika -- Bruxner, Tim -- Cloonan, Nicole -- Kolle, Gabriel -- Newell, Felicity -- Pinese, Mark -- Mead, R Scott -- Humphris, Jeremy L -- Kaplan, Warren -- Jones, Marc D -- Colvin, Emily K -- Nagrial, Adnan M -- Humphrey, Emily S -- Chou, Angela -- Chin, Venessa T -- Chantrill, Lorraine A -- Mawson, Amanda -- Samra, Jaswinder S -- Kench, James G -- Lovell, Jessica A -- Daly, Roger J -- Merrett, Neil D -- Toon, Christopher -- Epari, Krishna -- Nguyen, Nam Q -- Barbour, Andrew -- Zeps, Nikolajs -- Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative -- Kakkar, Nipun -- Zhao, Fengmei -- Wu, Yuan Qing -- Wang, Min -- Muzny, Donna M -- Fisher, William E -- Brunicardi, F Charles -- Hodges, Sally E -- Reid, Jeffrey G -- Drummond, Jennifer -- Chang, Kyle -- Han, Yi -- Lewis, Lora R -- Dinh, Huyen -- Buhay, Christian J -- Beck, Timothy -- Timms, Lee -- Sam, Michelle -- Begley, Kimberly -- Brown, Andrew -- Pai, Deepa -- Panchal, Ami -- Buchner, Nicholas -- De Borja, Richard -- Denroche, Robert E -- Yung, Christina K -- Serra, Stefano -- Onetto, Nicole -- Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata -- Tsao, Ming-Sound -- Shaw, Patricia A -- Petersen, Gloria M -- Gallinger, Steven -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Maitra, Anirban -- Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A -- Schulick, Richard D -- Wolfgang, Christopher L -- Morgan, Richard A -- Lawlor, Rita T -- Capelli, Paola -- Corbo, Vincenzo -- Scardoni, Maria -- Tortora, Giampaolo -- Tempero, Margaret A -- Mann, Karen M -- Jenkins, Nancy A -- Perez-Mancera, Pedro A -- Adams, David J -- Largaespada, David A -- Wessels, Lodewyk F A -- Rust, Alistair G -- Stein, Lincoln D -- Tuveson, David A -- Copeland, Neal G -- Musgrove, Elizabeth A -- Scarpa, Aldo -- Eshleman, James R -- Hudson, Thomas J -- Sutherland, Robert L -- Wheeler, David A -- Pearson, John V -- McPherson, John D -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Grimmond, Sean M -- 13031/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- 2P50CA101955/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA134292/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA101955/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA102701/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50CA062924/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA097075/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA97075/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 15;491(7424):399-405. doi: 10.1038/nature11547. Epub 2012 Oct 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103869" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Axons/*metabolism ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/*genetics/*pathology ; Gene Dosage ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genome/*genetics ; Humans ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; Mice ; Mutation ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology ; Proteins/genetics ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-09-18
    Description: The dimorphic switch from a single-cell budding yeast to a filamentous form enables Saccharomyces cerevisiae to forage for nutrients and the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans to invade human tissues and evade the immune system. We constructed a genome-wide set of targeted deletion alleles and introduced them into a filamentous S. cerevisiae strain, Sigma1278b. We identified genes involved in morphologically distinct forms of filamentation: haploid invasive growth, biofilm formation, and diploid pseudohyphal growth. Unique genes appear to underlie each program, but we also found core genes with general roles in filamentous growth, including MFG1 (YDL233w), whose product binds two morphogenetic transcription factors, Flo8 and Mss11, and functions as a critical transcriptional regulator of filamentous growth in both S. cerevisiae and C. albicans.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ryan, Owen -- Shapiro, Rebecca S -- Kurat, Christoph F -- Mayhew, David -- Baryshnikova, Anastasia -- Chin, Brian -- Lin, Zhen-Yuan -- Cox, Michael J -- Vizeacoumar, Frederick -- Cheung, Doris -- Bahr, Sondra -- Tsui, Kyle -- Tebbji, Faiza -- Sellam, Adnane -- Istel, Fabian -- Schwarzmuller, Tobias -- Reynolds, Todd B -- Kuchler, Karl -- Gifford, David K -- Whiteway, Malcolm -- Giaever, Guri -- Nislow, Corey -- Costanzo, Michael -- Gingras, Anne-Claude -- Mitra, Robi David -- Andrews, Brenda -- Fink, Gerald R -- Cowen, Leah E -- Boone, Charles -- 42516-4/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- GM035010/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM40266/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- MOP-97939/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Sep 14;337(6100):1353-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1224339.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3E1, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22984072" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Biofilms/growth & development ; Candida albicans/cytology/*genetics/*growth & development ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Gene Deletion ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal ; Hyphae/genetics/growth & development ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/cytology/*genetics/*growth & development ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics ; Trans-Activators/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-08-22
    Description: Alternative splicing (AS) generates extensive transcriptomic and proteomic complexity. However, the functions of species- and lineage-specific splice variants are largely unknown. Here we show that mammalian-specific skipping of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) exon 9 alters the splicing regulatory activities of PTBP1 and affects the inclusion levels of numerous exons. During neurogenesis, skipping of exon 9 reduces PTBP1 repressive activity so as to facilitate activation of a brain-specific AS program. Engineered skipping of the orthologous exon in chicken cells induces a large number of mammalian-like AS changes in PTBP1 target exons. These results thus reveal that a single exon-skipping event in an RNA binding regulator directs numerous AS changes between species. Our results further suggest that these changes contributed to evolutionary differences in the formation of vertebrate nervous systems.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gueroussov, Serge -- Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas -- Irimia, Manuel -- Raj, Bushra -- Lin, Zhen-Yuan -- Gingras, Anne-Claude -- Blencowe, Benjamin J -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 21;349(6250):868-73. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa8381.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada. Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada. ; Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada. EMBL/CRG Systems Biology Research Unit, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Dr. Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. ; Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada. ; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada. ; Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada. Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. b.blencowe@utoronto.ca.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26293963" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Alternative Splicing ; Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; Brain/*embryology ; Chickens ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism ; Exons/genetics ; HEK293 Cells ; Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/*genetics ; Humans ; Mice ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism ; Neurogenesis/*genetics ; Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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