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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-04-23
    Description: Polymers with the ability to repair themselves after sustaining damage could extend the lifetimes of materials used in many applications. Most approaches to healable materials require heating the damaged area. Here we present metallosupramolecular polymers that can be mended through exposure to light. They consist of telechelic, rubbery, low-molecular-mass polymers with ligand end groups that are non-covalently linked through metal-ion binding. On exposure to ultraviolet light, the metal-ligand motifs are electronically excited and the absorbed energy is converted into heat. This causes temporary disengagement of the metal-ligand motifs and a concomitant reversible decrease in the polymers' molecular mass and viscosity, thereby allowing quick and efficient defect healing. Light can be applied locally to a damage site, so objects can in principle be healed under load. We anticipate that this approach to healable materials, based on supramolecular polymers and a light-heat conversion step, can be applied to a wide range of supramolecular materials that use different chemistries.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Burnworth, Mark -- Tang, Liming -- Kumpfer, Justin R -- Duncan, Andrew J -- Beyer, Frederick L -- Fiore, Gina L -- Rowan, Stuart J -- Weder, Christoph -- England -- Nature. 2011 Apr 21;472(7343):334-7. doi: 10.1038/nature09963.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 2100 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21512571" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-03-01
    Description: Cancer chromosomal instability (CIN) results in an increased rate of change of chromosome number and structure and generates intratumour heterogeneity. CIN is observed in most solid tumours and is associated with both poor prognosis and drug resistance. Understanding a mechanistic basis for CIN is therefore paramount. Here we find evidence for impaired replication fork progression and increased DNA replication stress in CIN(+) colorectal cancer (CRC) cells relative to CIN(-) CRC cells, with structural chromosome abnormalities precipitating chromosome missegregation in mitosis. We identify three new CIN-suppressor genes (PIGN (also known as MCD4), MEX3C (RKHD2) and ZNF516 (KIAA0222)) encoded on chromosome 18q that are subject to frequent copy number loss in CIN(+) CRC. Chromosome 18q loss was temporally associated with aneuploidy onset at the adenoma-carcinoma transition. CIN-suppressor gene silencing leads to DNA replication stress, structural chromosome abnormalities and chromosome missegregation. Supplementing cells with nucleosides, to alleviate replication-associated damage, reduces the frequency of chromosome segregation errors after CIN-suppressor gene silencing, and attenuates segregation errors and DNA damage in CIN(+) cells. These data implicate a central role for replication stress in the generation of structural and numerical CIN, which may inform new therapeutic approaches to limit intratumour heterogeneity.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636055/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636055/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Burrell, Rebecca A -- McClelland, Sarah E -- Endesfelder, David -- Groth, Petra -- Weller, Marie-Christine -- Shaikh, Nadeem -- Domingo, Enric -- Kanu, Nnennaya -- Dewhurst, Sally M -- Gronroos, Eva -- Chew, Su Kit -- Rowan, Andrew J -- Schenk, Arne -- Sheffer, Michal -- Howell, Michael -- Kschischo, Maik -- Behrens, Axel -- Helleday, Thomas -- Bartek, Jiri -- Tomlinson, Ian P -- Swanton, Charles -- 090532/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- A11590/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A17786/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A19310/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A4688/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2013 Feb 28;494(7438):492-6. doi: 10.1038/nature11935.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23446422" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aneuploidy ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Chromosomal Instability/drug effects/*genetics ; Chromosome Segregation/drug effects/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18/drug effects/genetics ; Colorectal Neoplasms/*genetics/pathology ; DNA Copy Number Variations/genetics ; DNA Damage/drug effects/genetics ; DNA Replication/drug effects/*genetics ; Gene Deletion ; Gene Silencing ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; Humans ; Mitosis/drug effects ; Nucleosides/pharmacology ; Phosphotransferases/genetics ; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-02-09
    Description: Introduction Acute psychological stress, as well as unusual experiences including hallucinations and delusions, are common in critical care unit patients and have been linked to post-critical care psychological morbidity such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety. Little high-quality research has been conducted to evaluate psychological interventions that could alleviate longer-term psychological morbidity in the critical care unit setting. Our research team developed and piloted a nurse-led psychological intervention, aimed at reducing patient-reported PTSD symptom severity and other adverse psychological outcomes at 6 months, for evaluation in the POPPI trial. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre, parallel group, cluster-randomised clinical trial with a staggered roll-out of the intervention. The trial is being carried out at 24 (12 intervention, 12 control) NHS adult, general, critical care units in the UK and is evaluating the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led preventative psychological intervention in reducing patient-reported PTSD symptom severity and other psychological morbidity at 6 months. All sites deliver usual care for 5 months (baseline period). Intervention group sites are then trained to carry out the POPPI intervention, and transition to delivering the intervention for the rest of the recruitment period. Control group sites deliver usual care for the duration of the recruitment period. The trial also includes a process evaluation conducted independently of the trial team. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was reviewed and approved by the National Research Ethics Service South Central - Oxford B Research Ethics Committee (reference: 15/SC/0287). The first patient was recruited in September 2015 and results will be disseminated in 2018. The results will be presented at national and international conferences and published in peer reviewed medical journals. Trial registration number ISRCTN53448131 ; Pre-results.
    Keywords: Intensive care, Open access
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-06-20
    Description: Hawks et al. argue that our analysis of Australopithecus sediba mandibles is flawed and that specimen LD 350-1 cannot be distinguished from this, or any other, Australopithecus species. Our reexamination of the evidence confirms that LD 350-1 falls outside of the pattern that A. sediba shares with Australopithecus and thus is reasonably assigned to the genus Homo.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Villmoare, Brian -- Kimbel, William H -- Seyoum, Chalachew -- Campisano, Christopher J -- DiMaggio, Erin -- Rowan, John -- Braun, David R -- Arrowsmith, J Ramon -- Reed, Kaye E -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 19;348(6241):1326. doi: 10.1126/science.aab1122.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, 89154, USA. Center for the Advanced Study of Hominin Paleobiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA. Department of Anthropology, University College London, London WC1H 0BW, UK. brian.villmoare@unlv.edu wkimbel.iho@asu.edu. ; School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. brian.villmoare@unlv.edu wkimbel.iho@asu.edu. ; School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. ; School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. ; Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. ; Center for the Advanced Study of Hominin Paleobiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA. ; School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26089506" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; Hominidae/*anatomy & histology ; Humans
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-10-11
    Description: Spatial and temporal dissection of the genomic changes occurring during the evolution of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may help elucidate the basis for its dismal prognosis. We sequenced 25 spatially distinct regions from seven operable NSCLCs and found evidence of branched evolution, with driver mutations arising before and after subclonal diversification. There was pronounced intratumor heterogeneity in copy number alterations, translocations, and mutations associated with APOBEC cytidine deaminase activity. Despite maintained carcinogen exposure, tumors from smokers showed a relative decrease in smoking-related mutations over time, accompanied by an increase in APOBEC-associated mutations. In tumors from former smokers, genome-doubling occurred within a smoking-signature context before subclonal diversification, which suggested that a long period of tumor latency had preceded clinical detection. The regionally separated driver mutations, coupled with the relentless and heterogeneous nature of the genome instability processes, are likely to confound treatment success in NSCLC.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636050/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636050/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉de Bruin, Elza C -- McGranahan, Nicholas -- Mitter, Richard -- Salm, Max -- Wedge, David C -- Yates, Lucy -- Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam -- Shafi, Seema -- Murugaesu, Nirupa -- Rowan, Andrew J -- Gronroos, Eva -- Muhammad, Madiha A -- Horswell, Stuart -- Gerlinger, Marco -- Varela, Ignacio -- Jones, David -- Marshall, John -- Voet, Thierry -- Van Loo, Peter -- Rassl, Doris M -- Rintoul, Robert C -- Janes, Sam M -- Lee, Siow-Ming -- Forster, Martin -- Ahmad, Tanya -- Lawrence, David -- Falzon, Mary -- Capitanio, Arrigo -- Harkins, Timothy T -- Lee, Clarence C -- Tom, Warren -- Teefe, Enock -- Chen, Shann-Ching -- Begum, Sharmin -- Rabinowitz, Adam -- Phillimore, Benjamin -- Spencer-Dene, Bradley -- Stamp, Gordon -- Szallasi, Zoltan -- Matthews, Nik -- Stewart, Aengus -- Campbell, Peter -- Swanton, Charles -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 091730/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 105104/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- A11590/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A17786/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A19310/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A4688/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Oct 10;346(6206):251-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1253462.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Science and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK. ; Instituto de Biomedicina y Biotecnologia de Cantabria (CSIC-UC-Sodercan), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. Department of Human Genetics, University of Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. ; Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB23 3RE, UK. ; Lungs for Living Research Centre, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. University College London Hospitals, London NW1 2BU, UK. ; University College London Hospitals, London NW1 2BU, UK. ; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Carlsbad, CA 92008, USA. ; Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. Children's Hospital Informatics Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. charles.swanton@cancer.org.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25301630" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Carcinogens/toxicity ; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/chemically induced/*diagnosis/*genetics ; Cytidine Deaminase/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Dosage ; *Genetic Heterogeneity ; *Genomic Instability ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/chemically induced/*diagnosis/*genetics ; Mutation ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/genetics ; Prognosis ; Smoking/adverse effects ; Translocation, Genetic ; Tumor Cells, Cultured
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-03-06
    Description: Sedimentary basins in eastern Africa preserve a record of continental rifting and contain important fossil assemblages for interpreting hominin evolution. However, the record of hominin evolution between 3 and 2.5 million years ago (Ma) is poorly documented in surface outcrops, particularly in Afar, Ethiopia. Here we present the discovery of a 2.84- to 2.58-million-year-old fossil and hominin-bearing sediments in the Ledi-Geraru research area of Afar, Ethiopia, that have produced the earliest record of the genus Homo. Vertebrate fossils record a faunal turnover indicative of more open and probably arid habitats than those reconstructed earlier in this region, which is in broad agreement with hypotheses addressing the role of environmental forcing in hominin evolution at this time. Geological analyses constrain depositional and structural models of Afar and date the LD 350-1 Homo mandible to 2.80 to 2.75 Ma.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉DiMaggio, Erin N -- Campisano, Christopher J -- Rowan, John -- Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume -- Deino, Alan L -- Bibi, Faysal -- Lewis, Margaret E -- Souron, Antoine -- Garello, Dominique -- Werdelin, Lars -- Reed, Kaye E -- Arrowsmith, J Ramon -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 20;347(6228):1355-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa1415. Epub 2015 Mar 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. dimaggio@psu.edu kreed@asu.edu. ; Institute of Human Origins, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. ; CNRS Geosciences Rennes, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes, France. ; Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge Road, Berkeley, CA 94709, USA. ; Museum fur Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Invalidenstrasse 43, 10115 Berlin, Germany. ; Biology Program, Stockton University, 101 Vera King Farris Drive, Galloway, NJ 08205, USA. ; Human Evolution Research Center, University of California, Berkeley, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, Berkeley, CA, 94720-3160, USA. ; School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. ; Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Palaeobiology, Box 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25739409" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; *Ecosystem ; Ethiopia ; Fossils ; *Geologic Sediments ; *Hominidae
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-03-06
    Description: Our understanding of the origin of the genus Homo has been hampered by a limited fossil record in eastern Africa between 2.0 and 3.0 million years ago (Ma). Here we report the discovery of a partial hominin mandible with teeth from the Ledi-Geraru research area, Afar Regional State, Ethiopia, that establishes the presence of Homo at 2.80 to 2.75 Ma. This specimen combines primitive traits seen in early Australopithecus with derived morphology observed in later Homo, confirming that dentognathic departures from the australopith pattern occurred early in the Homo lineage. The Ledi-Geraru discovery has implications for hypotheses about the timing and place of origin of the genus Homo.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Villmoare, Brian -- Kimbel, William H -- Seyoum, Chalachew -- Campisano, Christopher J -- DiMaggio, Erin N -- Rowan, John -- Braun, David R -- Arrowsmith, J Ramon -- Reed, Kaye E -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 20;347(6228):1352-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa1343. Epub 2015 Mar 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA. Center for the Advanced Study of Hominin Paleobiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA. Department of Anthropology, University College London, London WC1H 0BW, UK. brian.villmoare@unlv.edu wkimbel.iho@asu.edu. ; Institute of Human Origins and School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. brian.villmoare@unlv.edu wkimbel.iho@asu.edu. ; Institute of Human Origins and School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. ; Institute of Human Origins and School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. ; Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. ; Center for the Advanced Study of Hominin Paleobiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA. ; School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25739410" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; Ethiopia ; Fossils ; Hominidae/*anatomy & histology ; Humans ; Mandible/anatomy & histology ; Tooth/anatomy & histology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1520-6882
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1740-8261
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: A male Persian cat with epileptiform convulsions was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. A space occupying lesion filled with cerebrospinal fluid, believed to be a caudal fossa arachnoid cyst, was found. This condition, which has not been previously described in the cat, was thought to be an incidental finding in the subject of this report.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    s.l. : American Chemical Society
    Analytical chemistry 28 (1956), S. 402-403 
    ISSN: 1520-6882
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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