Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 0009-286X
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Industrial Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Additional Material: 6 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-02-23
    Description: Unconventional superconductivity and other previously unknown phases of matter exist in the vicinity of a quantum critical point (QCP): a continuous phase change of matter at absolute zero. Intensive theoretical and experimental investigations on itinerant systems have shown that metallic ferromagnets tend to develop via either a first-order phase transition or through the formation of intermediate superconducting or inhomogeneous magnetic phases. Here, through precision low-temperature measurements, we show that the Gruneisen ratio of the heavy fermion metallic ferromagnet YbNi(4)(P(0.92)As(0.08))(2) diverges upon cooling to T = 0, indicating a ferromagnetic QCP. Our observation that this kind of instability, which is forbidden in d-electron metals, occurs in a heavy fermion system will have a large impact on the studies of quantum critical materials.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Steppke, Alexander -- Kuchler, Robert -- Lausberg, Stefan -- Lengyel, Edit -- Steinke, Lucia -- Borth, Robert -- Luhmann, Thomas -- Krellner, Cornelius -- Nicklas, Michael -- Geibel, Christoph -- Steglich, Frank -- Brando, Manuel -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Feb 22;339(6122):933-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1230583.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nothnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden, Germany. steppke@cpfs.mpg.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23430650" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-01-30
    Description: The smooth disappearance of antiferromagnetic order in strongly correlated metals commonly furnishes the development of unconventional superconductivity. The canonical heavy-electron compound YbRh2Si2 seems to represent an apparent exception from this quantum critical paradigm in that it is not a superconductor at temperature T 〉/= 10 millikelvin (mK). Here we report magnetic and calorimetric measurements on YbRh2Si2, down to temperatures as low as T approximately 1 mK. The data reveal the development of nuclear antiferromagnetic order slightly above 2 mK and of heavy-electron superconductivity almost concomitantly with this order. Our results demonstrate that superconductivity in the vicinity of quantum criticality is a general phenomenon.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schuberth, Erwin -- Tippmann, Marc -- Steinke, Lucia -- Lausberg, Stefan -- Steppke, Alexander -- Brando, Manuel -- Krellner, Cornelius -- Geibel, Christoph -- Yu, Rong -- Si, Qimiao -- Steglich, Frank -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 29;351(6272):485-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa9733. Epub 2016 Jan 28.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Walther Meissner Institut fur Tieftemperaturforschung der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching, Germany. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany. steglich@cpfs.mpg.de eschuber@ph.tum.de qmsi@rice.edu. ; Walther Meissner Institut fur Tieftemperaturforschung der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching, Germany. Physikdepartment, Technische Universitat Munchen, 80333 Munchen, Germany. ; Walther Meissner Institut fur Tieftemperaturforschung der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching, Germany. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany. ; Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany. ; Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany. Physics Institute, University of Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany. ; Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, China. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240, China. ; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA. steglich@cpfs.mpg.de eschuber@ph.tum.de qmsi@rice.edu. ; Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany. Center for Correlated Matter, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, China. Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China. steglich@cpfs.mpg.de eschuber@ph.tum.de qmsi@rice.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26823424" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-09-22
    Description: The low-temperature states of bosonic fluids exhibit fundamental quantum effects at the macroscopic scale: the best-known examples are Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity, which have been tested experimentally in a variety of different systems. When bosons interact, disorder can destroy condensation, leading to a 'Bose glass'. This phase has been very elusive in experiments owing to the absence of any broken symmetry and to the simultaneous absence of a finite energy gap in the spectrum. Here we report the observation of a Bose glass of field-induced magnetic quasiparticles in a doped quantum magnet (bromine-doped dichloro-tetrakis-thiourea-nickel, DTN). The physics of DTN in a magnetic field is equivalent to that of a lattice gas of bosons in the grand canonical ensemble; bromine doping introduces disorder into the hopping and interaction strength of the bosons, leading to their localization into a Bose glass down to zero field, where it becomes an incompressible Mott glass. The transition from the Bose glass (corresponding to a gapless spin liquid) to the Bose-Einstein condensate (corresponding to a magnetically ordered phase) is marked by a universal exponent that governs the scaling of the critical temperature with the applied field, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Our study represents a quantitative experimental account of the universal features of disordered bosons in the grand canonical ensemble.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yu, Rong -- Yin, Liang -- Sullivan, Neil S -- Xia, J S -- Huan, Chao -- Paduan-Filho, Armando -- Oliveira, Nei F Jr -- Haas, Stephan -- Steppke, Alexander -- Miclea, Corneliu F -- Weickert, Franziska -- Movshovich, Roman -- Mun, Eun-Deok -- Scott, Brian L -- Zapf, Vivien S -- Roscilde, Tommaso -- England -- Nature. 2012 Sep 20;489(7416):379-84. doi: 10.1038/nature11406.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22996552" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...