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  • 1
    Keywords: Medicine ; Oncology ; Human Physiology ; Neurosciences ; Developmental Biology ; Neurobiology ; Biomedicine ; Biomedicine general ; Neurobiology ; Neurosciences ; Human Physiology ; Cancer Research ; Developmental Biology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: 〈p〉Introduction -- 1 Primary and motile cilia: their ultrastructure and ciliogenesis -- 2 Primary Cilia, Sonic Hedgehog Signaling, and Spinal Cord Development -- 3 Primary cilia and brain development -- 4 Primary Cilia in Cerebral Cortex: Growth and Functions on Neuronal and Non-Neuronal Cells -- 5 Primary Cilia and Inner Ear Sensory Epithelia -- 6 Neuronal Cilia and Obesity -- 7 Motile cilia and brain function: ependymal motile cilia development, organization, function and their associated pathologies -- 8 Primary Cilia and Brain Cancer -- 9 Abnormalities of the Central Nervous System across the Ciliopathy Spectrum.〈/p〉
    Abstract: Cilia are tiny microtubule-based organelles projecting from the plasma membrane of practically all cells in the body. In the past 10 years a flurry of research has indicated a crucial role of this long-neglected organelle in the development and function of the central nervous system. A common theme of these studies is the critical dependency of signal transduction of the Sonic hedgehog, and more recently, Wnt signaling pathways upon cilia to regulate fate decisions and morphogenesis. Both primary and motile cilia also play crucial roles in the function of the nervous system, including the primary processing of sensory information, the control of body mass, and higher functions such as behavior and cognition, serving as "antennae" for neurons to sense and℗ process their environment. In this book we describe the structure and function of cilia and the various tissues throughout the brain and spinal cord that are dependent upon cilia for their proper development and function
    ISBN: 9789400758087
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  • 2
    Call number: B080:132
    Keywords: Pathology
    Pages: xv, 1425 p. : ill.
    Edition: 6th ed.
    ISBN: 072167335X
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    B080:132 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 3
    Unknown
    St. Louis, Mo. : Saunders Elsevier
    Call number: C020:114
    Keywords: Pregnancy / physiology ; Fetus / Physiology ; Infant, Newborn / physiology
    Pages: xv, 777 p. : ill.
    Edition: 3rd ed.
    ISBN: 9781416029441
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    C020:114 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Protoplasma 174 (1993), S. 36-44 
    ISSN: 1615-6102
    Keywords: Cell-to-cell communication ; Plasmodesmata ; Setcreasea purpurea ; Transport ; Intercellular
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Diffusion coefficients for FITC-molecular probes in intercellular pores (D) and rate of molecular probe loss into the vacuole (k1) have been obtained for FITC molecular probes in staminal hairs ofSetcreasea purpurea. The kinetic curves of FITC-Gly, -Ala, -Leu,-Ser, -Thr, -Cys, -Met, -Tyr, -Asp, -Glu, -Asn, -Gln, -Lys, -His,-Arg, -(Asp)2, -(Glu)2, -(Lys)2, -(Asp)3, -(Glu)3, -(Gln)2, -(Gln)3, -(Gln)4, and carboxyfluorescein (group I probes) matched the curves calculated for simple diffusion through a chain of cells, while the majority of kinetic curves of FITC-Phe, and -Try (group II probes) did not. None of the kinetic curves for FITC-(Met)2 and -(His)2 (group III probes) matched. Average Ds for group I probes ranged from 0.77× 10−8cm2/s to 3.75× 10−8cm2/s and for group II probes were 0.50× 10−8cm2/s. A meaningful average D for group III probes could not be calculated. Average k1 for group I probes ranged from 1.62× 10−7/μm2/s to 13.21× 10−7/μm2/s, and for group II probes were 5.42 and 11.54× 10−7/μm2/s. Average k1s for group III probes could not be calculated. Symplastic transport occurred by cell-to-cell diffusion for most of the probes (e.g., group I probes) but not always for some (e.g., group II probes) and never for others (group III probes). The rate of cell-to-cell diffusion and loss within the vacuole depended upon the molecule's specific structure, molecular weight and charge. We concluded that plasmodesmata select for molecules that are hydrophilic, small and have a charge of from — 2 to — 4, and against molecules that contain either Phe, Try, Met or His groups.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 290 (1981), S. 495-496 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] The Cheshire Basin is filled with Triassic sediments dating from the Anisian (lower Middle Triassic) and reaching several kilometres in thickness2,3. There are two thick halite developments in the sequence: a lower Northwich Halite Formation (290 m) and an upper Wilkesley Halite Formation (400 m)4. ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1573-6776
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Summary Xylose isomerase was purified from a transformedE. coli strain (LE392-pRK248/pTXI-1) (Lastick et al., 1986) that overproduces the enzyme by induction of the strong lambda PL promotor. Kinetic data, N-terminal sequence analysis, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography and immunodiffusion were used to compare the overproduced enzyme with xylose isomerase purified from xylose induced, non-transformedE. coli LE392 cells; no differences between these purified enzyme preparations were found.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; MARKER ; IMPACT ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; STAGE ; IDENTIFICATION ; HEALTH ; SNP ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; diabetes ; REPLICATION ; FUTURE ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; ONCOLOGY ; VARIANT ; METAANALYSIS ; biomarker ; methods ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; genetic association ; SCAN ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Type ; single nucleotide ; RISK-ASSOCIATED LOCI
    Abstract: Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (PrCa). In the two-stage Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility prostate cancer scan, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10486567, located within intron 2 of JAZF1 gene on chromosome 7p15.2, showed a promising association with PrCa overall (P = 2.14 x 10(-6)), with a suggestion of stronger association with aggressive disease (P = 1.2 x 10(-7)). Methods: In the third stage of genome-wide association studies, we genotyped 106 JAZF1 SNPs in 10,286 PrCa cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry. Results: The strongest association was observed with the initial marker rs10486567, which now achieves genome-wide significance [P = 7.79 x 10(-11); ORHET, 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.27); ORHOM, 1.37 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.56)]. We did not confirm a previous suggestion of a stronger association of rs10486567 with aggressive disease (P = 1.60 x 10(-4) for aggressive cancer, n = 4,597; P = 3.25 x 10(-8) for non-aggressive cancer, n = 4,514). Based on a multilocus model with adjustment for rs10486567, no additional independent signals were observed at chromosome 7p15.2. There was no association between PrCa risk and SNPs in JAZF1 previously associated with height (rs849140; P = 0.587), body stature (rs849141, tagged by rs849136; P = 0.171), and risk of type 2 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus (rs864745, tagged by rs849142; P = 0.657). Conclusion: rs10486567 remains the most significant marker for PrCa risk within JAZF1 in individuals of European ancestry. Impact: Future studies should identify all variants in high linkage disequilibrium with rs10486567 and evaluate their functional significance for PrCa. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(5); 1349-55. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20406958
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  • 8
    Keywords: MODELS ; POPULATION ; SIGNAL ; BREAST-CANCER ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; COMMON VARIANT ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS ; IDENTIFIES 5 ; MYEOV
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies have identified prostate cancer susceptibility alleles on chromosome 11q13. As part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative, the region flanking the most significant marker, rs10896449, was fine mapped in 10 272 cases and 9123 controls of European origin (10 studies) using 120 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected by a two-staged tagging strategy using HapMap SNPs. Single-locus analysis identified 18 SNPs below genome-wide significance (P 〈 10(-8)) with rs10896449 the most significant (P = 7.94 x 10(-19)). Multi-locus models that included significant SNPs sequentially identified a second association at rs12793759 [odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 4.76 x 10(-5), adjusted P = 0.004] that is independent of rs10896449 and remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing within the region. rs10896438, a proxy of previously reported rs12418451 (r(2) = 0.96), independent of both rs10896449 and rs12793759 was detected (OR = 1.07, P = 5.92 x 10(-3), adjusted P = 0.054). Our observation of a recombination hotspot that separates rs10896438 from rs10896449 and rs12793759, and low linkage disequilibrium (rs10896449-rs12793759, r(2) = 0.17; rs10896449-rs10896438, r(2) = 0.10; rs12793759-rs10896438, r(2) = 0.12) corroborate our finding of three independent signals. By analysis of tagged SNPs across similar to 123 kb using next generation sequencing of 63 controls of European origin, 1000 Genome and HapMap data, we observed multiple surrogates for the three independent signals marked by rs10896449 (n = 31), rs10896438 (n = 24) and rs12793759 (n = 8). Our results indicate that a complex architecture underlying the common variants contributing to prostate cancer risk at 11q13. We estimate that at least 63 common variants should be considered in future studies designed to investigate the biological basis of the multiple association signals
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21531787
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  • 9
    Keywords: TUMORS ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ABERRATIONS ; MUTATIONS ; CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA ; ANEUPLOIDY ; GENOMIC IMBALANCES ; MAFFUCCI SYNDROME ; OLLIER DISEASE
    Abstract: In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls from 13 genome-wide association studies, we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones in DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. We observed mosaic abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of 〉 2 Mb in size in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%), with abnormal cell proportions of between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, frequency increased with age, from 0.23% under 50 years to 1.91% between 75 and 79 years (P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals; odds ratio (OR) = 1.25; P = 0.016), with stronger association with cases who had DNA collected before diagnosis or treatment (OR = 1.45; P = 0.0005). Detectable mosaicism was also more common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least 1 year before diagnosis with leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR = 35.4; P = 3.8 x 10(-11)). These findings underscore the time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and potentially other late-onset diseases
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22561519
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  • 10
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