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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-09-10
    Description: Our goal is to develop a vaccine that sustainably prevents Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria in 〉/=80% of recipients. Pf sporozoites (PfSPZ) administered by mosquito bites are the only immunogens shown to induce such protection in humans. Such protection is thought to be mediated by CD8(+) T cells in the liver that secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We report that purified irradiated PfSPZ administered to 80 volunteers by needle inoculation in the skin was safe, but suboptimally immunogenic and protective. Animal studies demonstrated that intravenous immunization was critical for inducing a high frequency of PfSPZ-specific CD8(+), IFN-gamma-producing T cells in the liver (nonhuman primates, mice) and conferring protection (mice). Our results suggest that intravenous administration of this vaccine will lead to the prevention of infection with Pf malaria.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Epstein, J E -- Tewari, K -- Lyke, K E -- Sim, B K L -- Billingsley, P F -- Laurens, M B -- Gunasekera, A -- Chakravarty, S -- James, E R -- Sedegah, M -- Richman, A -- Velmurugan, S -- Reyes, S -- Li, M -- Tucker, K -- Ahumada, A -- Ruben, A J -- Li, T -- Stafford, R -- Eappen, A G -- Tamminga, C -- Bennett, J W -- Ockenhouse, C F -- Murphy, J R -- Komisar, J -- Thomas, N -- Loyevsky, M -- Birkett, A -- Plowe, C V -- Loucq, C -- Edelman, R -- Richie, T L -- Seder, R A -- Hoffman, S L -- 5R44AI055229-07/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5R44AI058375-05/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5R44AI058499-05/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Oct 28;334(6055):475-80. doi: 10.1126/science.1211548. Epub 2011 Sep 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program, Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21903775" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Adult ; Animals ; Antibodies, Protozoan/blood/immunology ; Antigens, Protozoan/immunology ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Humans ; Injections, Intravenous ; Injections, Subcutaneous ; Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis/immunology ; Liver/*immunology ; Macaca mulatta ; Malaria Vaccines/administration & dosage/adverse effects/*immunology ; Malaria, Falciparum/*prevention & control ; Mice ; Middle Aged ; Plasmodium falciparum/*immunology ; Rabbits ; Sporozoites/*immunology ; Vaccines, Attenuated/administration & dosage/adverse effects/immunology ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-08-10
    Description: Consistent, high-level, vaccine-induced protection against human malaria has only been achieved by inoculation of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (SPZ) by mosquito bites. We report that the PfSPZ Vaccine--composed of attenuated, aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ--was safe and well tolerated when administered four to six times intravenously (IV) to 40 adults. Zero of six subjects receiving five doses and three of nine subjects receiving four doses of 1.35 x 10(5) PfSPZ Vaccine and five of six nonvaccinated controls developed malaria after controlled human malaria infection (P = 0.015 in the five-dose group and P = 0.028 for overall, both versus controls). PfSPZ-specific antibody and T cell responses were dose-dependent. These data indicate that there is a dose-dependent immunological threshold for establishing high-level protection against malaria that can be achieved with IV administration of a vaccine that is safe and meets regulatory standards.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seder, Robert A -- Chang, Lee-Jah -- Enama, Mary E -- Zephir, Kathryn L -- Sarwar, Uzma N -- Gordon, Ingelise J -- Holman, LaSonji A -- James, Eric R -- Billingsley, Peter F -- Gunasekera, Anusha -- Richman, Adam -- Chakravarty, Sumana -- Manoj, Anita -- Velmurugan, Soundarapandian -- Li, MingLin -- Ruben, Adam J -- Li, Tao -- Eappen, Abraham G -- Stafford, Richard E -- Plummer, Sarah H -- Hendel, Cynthia S -- Novik, Laura -- Costner, Pamela J M -- Mendoza, Floreliz H -- Saunders, Jamie G -- Nason, Martha C -- Richardson, Jason H -- Murphy, Jittawadee -- Davidson, Silas A -- Richie, Thomas L -- Sedegah, Martha -- Sutamihardja, Awalludin -- Fahle, Gary A -- Lyke, Kirsten E -- Laurens, Matthew B -- Roederer, Mario -- Tewari, Kavita -- Epstein, Judith E -- Sim, B Kim Lee -- Ledgerwood, Julie E -- Graham, Barney S -- Hoffman, Stephen L -- VRC 312 Study Team -- 3R44AI055229-06S1/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 4R44AI055229-08/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5R44AI058499-05/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- N01-AI-40096/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Sep 20;341(6152):1359-65. doi: 10.1126/science.1241800. Epub 2013 Aug 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA. rseder@mail.nih.gov〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23929949" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Administration, Intravenous ; Adult ; Animals ; Cytokines/immunology ; Female ; Humans ; Immunity, Cellular ; Malaria Vaccines/*administration & dosage/adverse effects/*immunology ; Malaria, Falciparum/*prevention & control ; Male ; Mice ; Plasmodium falciparum/*immunology ; Sporozoites/immunology ; T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Vaccination/adverse effects/methods
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-01-03
    Description: Antibodies against the central repeat of the Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) circumsporozoite protein (CSP) inhibit parasite activity and correlate with protection from malaria. However, the humoral response to the PfCSP C terminus (C-PfCSP) is less well characterized. Here, we describe B cell responses to C-PfCSP from European donors who underwent immunization with live Pf sporozoites (PfSPZ Challenge) under chloroquine prophylaxis (PfSPZ-CVac), and were protected against controlled human malaria infection. Out of 215 PfCSP-reactive monoclonal antibodies, only two unique antibodies were specific for C-PfCSP, highlighting the rare occurrence of C-PfCSP–reactive B cells in PfSPZ-CVac–induced protective immunity. These two antibodies showed poor sporozoite binding and weak inhibition of parasite traversal and development, and did not protect mice from infection with PfCSP transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites. Structural analyses demonstrated that one antibody interacts with a polymorphic region overlapping two T cell epitopes, suggesting that variability in C-PfCSP may benefit parasite escape from humoral and cellular immunity. Our data identify important features underlying C-PfCSP shortcomings as a vaccine target.
    Keywords: Infectious Disease and Host Defense
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-06-22
    Description: Affinity maturation selects B cells expressing somatically mutated antibody variants with improved antigen-binding properties to protect from invading pathogens. We determined the molecular mechanism underlying the clonal selection and affinity maturation of human B cells expressing protective antibodies against the circumsporozoite protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfCSP). We show in molecular detail that the repetitive nature of PfCSP facilitates direct homotypic interactions between two PfCSP repeat-bound monoclonal antibodies, thereby improving antigen affinity and B cell activation. These data provide a mechanistic explanation for the strong selection of somatic mutations that mediate homotypic antibody interactions after repeated parasite exposure in humans. Our findings demonstrate a different mode of antigen-mediated affinity maturation to improve antibody responses to PfCSP and presumably other repetitive antigens.
    Keywords: Biochemistry, Immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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