Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-08-20
    Description: Most cancer cells are characterized by aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes. We have identified a clue to the mechanistic origins of aneuploidy through integrative genomic analyses of human tumors. A diverse range of tumor types were found to harbor deletions or inactivating mutations of STAG2, a gene encoding a subunit of the cohesin complex, which regulates the separation of sister chromatids during cell division. Because STAG2 is on the X chromosome, its inactivation requires only a single mutational event. Studying a near-diploid human cell line with a stable karyotype, we found that targeted inactivation of STAG2 led to chromatid cohesion defects and aneuploidy, whereas in two aneuploid human glioblastoma cell lines, targeted correction of the endogenous mutant alleles of STAG2 led to enhanced chromosomal stability. Thus, genetic disruption of cohesin is a cause of aneuploidy in human cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3374335/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3374335/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Solomon, David A -- Kim, Taeyeon -- Diaz-Martinez, Laura A -- Fair, Joshlean -- Elkahloun, Abdel G -- Harris, Brent T -- Toretsky, Jeffrey A -- Rosenberg, Steven A -- Shukla, Neerav -- Ladanyi, Marc -- Samuels, Yardena -- James, C David -- Yu, Hongtao -- Kim, Jung-Sik -- Waldman, Todd -- CA097257/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA133662/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA138212/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA169345/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA115699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R21CA143282/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Z01 HG200337-01/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Aug 19;333(6045):1039-43. doi: 10.1126/science.1203619.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC 20057, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21852505" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Aneuploidy ; Antigens, Nuclear/*genetics/*physiology ; Cell Cycle ; Cell Line ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Chromatids/physiology ; *Chromosomal Instability ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics ; Female ; Gene Deletion ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Silencing ; Gene Targeting ; Glioblastoma/*genetics ; Humans ; Karyotyping ; Male ; Melanoma/genetics ; Mutation ; Neoplasms/*genetics ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Sarcoma, Ewing/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-0533
    Keywords: Key words Glioneuronal tumor ; Neurocytoma ; Neuropil islands ; Spinal cord ; Anti-Hu
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Distinctive glioneuronal tumors arising within the cerebrum and displaying neuropil-like islands and tumor cells immunoreactive for neuronal and glial antigens have recently been described. We report a similar tumor in the cervico-thoracic region of the spinal cord in a 44-year-old woman that recurred 1 year later with dissemination to the lumbar dura and cauda equina. The tumor was composed of “rosetted” neuropil islands displaying immunoreactivity for synaptophysin, whereas the intervening tumor cells were more fibrillar and immunoreactive for GFAP. The tumor cell nuclei immediately surrounding these neuropil islands were immunoreactive to the newly characterized neuronal marker, anti-Hu. While several cases of neurocytomas have been described in the spinal cord, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a glioneuronal tumor with “rosetted” neuropil islands to be reported in the spinal cord.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-0533
    Keywords: Key words Craniopharyngioma ; Adamantinomatous ; Melanin ; Odontogenic tumors
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract We report a 74-year-old woman and a 50-year-old woman with similar histories of headache and visual disturbance who were found to have adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas which contained melanin pigment. This finding was confirmed by the Masson Fontana method and ultrastructural studies. These are only the second and third cases reported describing melanin pigment within a craniopharyngioma. The finding of melanin in craniopharyngiomas attests to their similarities with odontogenic tumors of the jaw, which can also contain melanin pigment and also supports the hypothesis that the histogenesis of these neoplasms derives from the vestiges of Rathke’s pouch epithelium.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-09-05
    Description: Purpose: Most bladder cancers are early-stage tumors known as papillary non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). After resection, up to 70% of NMIBCs recur locally, and up to 20% of these recurrences progress to muscle invasion. There is an unmet need for additional biomarkers for stratifying tumors based on their risk of recurrence and progression. We previously identified STAG2 as among the most commonly mutated genes in NMIBC and provided initial evidence in a pilot cohort that STAG2 -mutant tumors recurred less frequently than STAG2 wild-type tumors. Here, we report a STAG2 biomarker validation study using two independent cohorts of clinically annotated papillary NMIBC tumors from the United States and Europe. Experimental Design: The value of STAG2 immunostaining for prediction of recurrence was initially evaluated in a cohort of 82 patients with papillary NMIBC ("Georgetown cohort"). Next, the value of STAG2 immunostaining for prediction of progression to muscle invasion was evaluated in a progressor-enriched cohort of 253 patients with papillary NMIBC ("Aarhus cohort"). Results: In the Georgetown cohort, 52% of NMIBC tumors with intact STAG2 expression recurred, whereas 25% of STAG2-deficient tumors recurred ( P = 0.02). Multivariable analysis identified intact STAG2 expression as an independent predictor of recurrence (HR = 2.4; P = 0.05). In the progressor-enriched Aarhus cohort, 38% of tumors with intact STAG2 expression progressed within 5 years, versus 16% of STAG2-deficient tumors ( P 〈 0.01). Multivariable analysis identified intact STAG2 expression as an independent predictor of progression (HR = 1.86; P = 0.05). Conclusions: STAG2 IHC is a simple, binary, new assay for risk stratification in papillary NMIBC. Clin Cancer Res; 24(17); 4145–53. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...