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  • 1
    Keywords: COMBINATION ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; RISK ; HEART ; TIME ; MARKER ; ASSOCIATION ; ASSAY ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; NUMBER ; AGE ; meta-analysis ; smoking ; DATABASE ; C-REACTIVE PROTEIN ; MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION ; HEART-DISEASE ; vascular disease ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ISCHEMIC-STROKE ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; METAANALYSIS ; LEVEL ; methods ; EXTENT ; ARTERY-DISEASE ; MIDDLE-AGED MEN ; ACTIVATING-FACTOR-ACETYLHYDROLASE ; ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK ; lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) ; LIPOPROTEIN-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE-A2 ; REPEAT
    Abstract: Background A large number of observational epidemiological studies have reported generally positive associations' between circulating mass and activity levels of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Few studies have been large enough to provide reliable estimates in different circumstances, such as in different subgroups (e.g., by age group, sex, or smoking status) or at different Lp-PLA2 levels. Moreover, most published studies have related disease risk only to baseline values of Lp-PLA(2) markers (which can lead to substantial underestimation of any risk relationships because of within-person variability over time) and have used different approaches to adjustment for possible confounding factors. Objectives By combination of data from individual participants from all relevant observational studies in a systematic,meta-analysis, with correction for regression dilution (using available data on serial measurements of Lp-PLA(2)), the Lp-PLA(2) Studies Collaboration will aim to characterize more precisely than has previously been possible the strength and shape of the age and sex-specific associations of plasma Lp-PLA(2) with coronary heart disease (and, where data are sufficient with other vascular diseases, such as ischaemic stroke). It will also help to determine to what extent such associations are independent of possible confounding factors and to explore potential sources of heterogeneity among studies, such as those related to assay methods and study design. It is anticipated that the present collaboration will serve as a framework to investigate related questions on Lp-PLA(2) and cardiovascular outcomes. Methods A central database is being established containing data on circulating Lp-PLA(2) values, sex and other potential confounding factors, age at baseline Lp-PLA(2) Measurement, age at event or at last follow-up, major vascular morbidity and cause-specific mortality. Information about any repeat measurements of Lp-PLA2 and potential confounding factors has been sought to allow adjustment for possible confounding and correction for regression dilution. The analyses will involve age-specific regression models. Synthesis of the available observational studies of Lp-PLA(2) will yield information on a total of about 15 000 cardiovascular disease endpoints
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17301621
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-01-03
    Description: BACKGROUND: Excess weight is associated with subclinical myocardial damage, as reflected by high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) concentrations, which portends high heart failure risk. However, the association between weight history and myocardial damage is unknown. METHODS: We evaluated 9062 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) visit 4 (1996–1999) participants with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 kg/m 2 and no previous cardiovascular disease. We cross-tabulated visit 4 ("current") BMI categories of normal weight, overweight, and obese with those at visit 1 (1987–1989) and with BMI categories calculated from self-reported weight at age 25 years. Duration of obesity was calculated in years. A cumulative weight measure of "excess BMI-years" was also calculated [product of mean BMI (centered at 25 kg/m 2 ) over all ARIC time points x follow-up duration]. We used logistic regression to estimate associations of weight history metrics with increased hs-cTnT (≥14 ng/L) at visit 4. RESULTS: Overall, 623 individuals (7%) had increased hs-cTnT at visit 4. Within each current BMI category, previous excess weight was associated with increased hs-cTnT, with the strongest associations for those with past and current obesity [odds ratio (OR), 3.85; 95% CI, 2.51–5.90 for obesity at age 25 years and visit 4]. Each 10-year longer obesity duration was associated with increased hs-cTnT (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.17–1.35). Each 100 higher excess BMI-years was also progressively associated with increased hs-cTnT (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14–1.27). CONCLUSIONS: Previous obesity and greater cumulative weight from young adulthood increase the likelihood of myocardial damage, indicating long-term toxic effects of adiposity on the myocardium and the need for weight maintenance strategies targeting the entire life span.
    Keywords: Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors
    Print ISSN: 0009-9147
    Electronic ISSN: 1530-8561
    Topics: Medicine
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