Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Food Research International 25 (1992), S. 411-417 
    ISSN: 0963-9969
    Keywords: beef products ; meat quality ; objective texture ; texture
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1365-2621
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Collagen fluorescence in comminuted mixtures of chicken skin and muscle was measured through a quartz-glass rod. High proportions of skin decreased the gel strength of the cooked product (r=—0.99, P 〈 0.005), caused higher cooking losses (r = 0.99, P 〈 0.005) and decreased the fluid-holding capacity measured by centri-fugation (r=—0.92, P 〈 0.005). Fluorescence intensity was strongly correlated with skin content (r〈0.99 from 460 to 510 nm) and, thus, was strongly correlated with gel strength, cooking losses and fluid-holding capacity.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1365-2621
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: A fibre-optic light guide was used to measure the internal reflectance (interactance from 400 to 1000nm) of slurries of comminuted meat. For mixtures of pork adipose tissue and beef muscle with a low connective tissue content, internal reflectance at 1000nm was correlated with lipid content (r=0.99, P〈0.005) and with cooking loss (r=0.99, P〈0.005), and at 930nm with centrifugation fluid loss (r=0.77, P〈0.005). For pork muscle varying in pH but adjusted to a constant lipid content, internal reflectance at 780nm was correlated with pH (r= -0.80, P〈0.01), at 690nm with centrifugation fluid loss (r=0.74, P〈0.025) and at 710nm with cooking loss (r=0.63, P〈0.05). The additive nature of these correlations favours the use of internal reflectance to predict the functional properties of meat slurries.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of muscle foods 6 (1995), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1745-4573
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Finely comminuted meat products are a mixture of proteins, fat particles, water, salt and often carbohydrates. During preparation of the raw meat batter, fat is chopped into tiny particles which are thoroughly mixed within the comminuted lean meat. During cooking, the challenge is to minimize/prevent fat and moisture separation from the product. During the past 3–4 decades two major, but differently oriented, research thrusts have been presented to explain the mechanism(s) by which meat batters are stabilized. They include the emulsion theory and the physical entrapment theory. The first emphasizes the importance of fat emulsification (i.e., forming an interfacial protein film around the fat globules) whereas the physical entrapment theory stresses the importance of the protein matrix in binding the fat. The exact mechanism by which finely comminuted meat batters are stabilized is still uncertain. In this review arguments presented to support both research thrusts are discussed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of muscle foods 4 (1993), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1745-4573
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Water holding capacity (WHC) of ground beef was measured by the press method. Three levels of applied force, test duration, sample mass, and salt concentration were investigated. Three types of deformations – plastic, elastic and permanent were used to explain the effects of applied force on WHC. Viscoelastic properties explained the effects of test duration. In general, WHC decreased with additional applied force and test duration, and increased with a larger sample size and salt concentration. Recommended test conditions are: 1 g sample size, 20 kN force for 2 min at a salt concentration of 0, 1 or 2%.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 1745-4549
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Effects of tumbling speed (15 or 25 rpm) and cumulative revolutions of the tumbler (3000, 6000 or 9000) on the quality of restructured hams were investigated. These variables had no significant effect on shrinkage and water holding capacity. However, products processed at 25 rpm and 3,000 revolutions were significantly harder, gummier, and chewier than other treatments. the hams processed at 25 rpm were significantly darker and chewier compared to the ones processed at 15 rpm as perceived by the taste panelists. Hams processed at 3,000 or 9,000 revolutions were the most tender. Overall, all the processing schedules resulted in acceptable products as judged by the sensory panel.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of muscle foods 4 (1993), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1745-4573
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: The effects of various test parameters on stress relaxation analysis measuring viscoelastic properties of beef products, and the suitability of different models to describe that test data were investigated. Three types of processed meat products were evaluated: finely comminuted (frankfurter), ground beef (salami), and whole muscle (corned beef). Cylindrical specimens of meat products, 10, 15 or 20 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length were compressed to 10%, 20% or 30% of their original height for 9 min. The data were fitted using the Maxwell model with two elements and other available models in the literature. Stress was calculated by dividing the force by initial cross sectional area of the sample, and modulus by dividing stress by strain. Both sample size and compression ratio affected model parameters. A diameter to length ratio (D/L) of 1.5 and any compression ration were suitable for the whole muscle product; D/L of 1.5 and 10% or lower compression for ground beef; and D/L of 2 and 10% or lower compression ratio for finely comminuted products were the suitable test conditions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of muscle foods 3 (1992), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1745-4573
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: The effects of various chemical modifications on gelation and texture of finely comminuted lean beef mixes were investigated. Urea, which disrupts non-covalent bonds, significantly increased (at 95% level) the modulus of rigidity (G) and hardness values compared to the control (no additive). Oxidation of free sulphdryl groups by H2O2 resulted in lower G but similar hardness values of the control. The β-mercaptoethanol (ME) treatment was similar to the control in G values but higher in hardness, gumminess and chewiness. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition resulted in excessive cooking losses, the lowest G value and the hardest texture. Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate did not have any significant effect on the textural characteristics of the finely comminuted mixes but resulted in lower G compared to the control.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 1745-4549
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: The effects of fat level, kappa and iota carrageenans, and xanthan gum on the composition, hydration, textural properties, color, and sensory properties of pork/beef frankfurters were evaluated. Cooking losses and pH were not affected by fat levels or gums. Reheating losses were lower in the high fat products compared to low fat treatments. Iota reduced the water holding capacity of low fat products. Xanthan gum provided the largest increase in color lightness (L) of raw low-fat products and also of cooked products that were stored frozen. Redness (a) increased due to cooking and also due to freezing. Product hardness, springiness, and chewiness were reduced by iota and xanthan gums. All the products were equally liked by the sensory panel.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    ISSN: 1745-4549
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: The gelation patterns and rheological properties of poultry meat emulsions prepared with average and reduced NaCl levels (2.5% and 1.5%, respectively) and with three polyphosphates (0.5% tripolyphosphate = TPP, hexametaphosphate = HMP, or sodium acid pyrophosphate = SAPP) added to the reduced salt emulsion were studied.Using 2.5% NaCl resulted in the highest yield stress value as compared to all the other treatments; SAPP addition significantly reduced yield stress of the raw emulsion. The relationship between the shear rate and shear stress of the raw emulsions was nonlinear and appears to resemble the Bingham pseudoplastic behavior.Plots of the modulus of rigidity (G) versus cooking temperature indicated differences in gelation patterns and maximum G for the different treatments. The highest G was observed in the 2.5% NaCl emulsion followed in decreasing order by the emulsions containing 1.5% NaCl + 0.5% HMP, 1.5% NaCl + 0.5% HMP, 1.5% NaCl, and the 1.5% NaCl + 0.5% TPP treatment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...