Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: PROSTATE-CANCER ; ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA ; ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA ; SOMATIC MUTATIONS ; GENETIC LANDSCAPE ; 21 BREAST CANCERS ; RECURRENT MUTATIONS ; FREQUENT MUTATION
    Abstract: All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, 'kataegis', is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23945592
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-08-10
    Description: Messenger RNA encodes cellular function and phenotype. In the context of human cancer, it defines the identities of malignant cells and the diversity of tumor tissue. We studied 72,501 single-cell transcriptomes of human renal tumors and normal tissue from fetal, pediatric, and adult kidneys. We matched childhood Wilms tumor with specific fetal cell types, thus providing evidence for the hypothesis that Wilms tumor cells are aberrant fetal cells. In adult renal cell carcinoma, we identified a canonical cancer transcriptome that matched a little-known subtype of proximal convoluted tubular cell. Analyses of the tumor composition defined cancer-associated normal cells and delineated a complex vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling circuit. Our findings reveal the precise cellular identities and compositions of human kidney tumors.
    Keywords: Development, Medicine, Diseases
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-08-31
    Description: Sarcomas are cancers of the bone and soft tissue often defined by gene fusions. Ewing sarcoma involves fusions between EWSR1 , a gene encoding an RNA binding protein, and E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors. We explored how and when EWSR1-ETS fusions arise by studying the whole genomes of Ewing sarcomas. In 52 of 124 (42%) of tumors, the fusion gene arises by a sudden burst of complex, loop-like rearrangements, a process called chromoplexy, rather than by simple reciprocal translocations. These loops always contained the disease-defining fusion at the center, but they disrupted multiple additional genes. The loops occurred preferentially in early replicating and transcriptionally active genomic regions. Similar loops forming canonical fusions were found in three other sarcoma types. Chromoplexy-generated fusions appear to be associated with an aggressive form of Ewing sarcoma. These loops arise early, giving rise to both primary and relapse Ewing sarcoma tumors, which can continue to evolve in parallel.
    Keywords: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-02-09
    Description: Sam Behjati, Susan Lindsay, Sarah A. Teichmann, and Muzlifah Haniffa Human development is regulated by spatiotemporally restricted molecular programmes and is pertinent to many areas of basic biology and human medicine, such as stem cell biology, reproductive medicine and childhood cancer. Mapping human development has presented significant technological, logistical and ethical challenges. The availability of established human developmental biorepositories and the advent of cutting-edge single-cell technologies provide new opportunities to study human development. Here, we present a working framework for the establishment of a human developmental cell atlas exploiting single-cell genomics and spatial analysis. We discuss how the development atlas will benefit the scientific and clinical communities to advance our understanding of basic biology, health and disease.
    Keywords: Human development
    Print ISSN: 0950-1991
    Electronic ISSN: 1477-9129
    Topics: Biology
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: The somatic mutations present in the genome of a cell accumulate over the lifetime of a multicellular organism. These mutations can provide insights into the developmental lineage tree, the number of divisions that each cell has undergone and the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we describe whole genomes of clonal lines derived from multiple tissues of healthy mice. Using somatic base substitutions, we reconstructed the early cell divisions of each animal, demonstrating the contributions of embryonic cells to adult tissues. Differences were observed between tissues in the numbers and types of mutations accumulated by each cell, which likely reflect differences in the number of cell divisions they have undergone and varying contributions of different mutational processes. If somatic mutation rates are similar to those in mice, the results indicate that precise insights into development and mutagenesis of normal human cells will be possible.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4227286/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4227286/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Behjati, Sam -- Huch, Meritxell -- van Boxtel, Ruben -- Karthaus, Wouter -- Wedge, David C -- Tamuri, Asif U -- Martincorena, Inigo -- Petljak, Mia -- Alexandrov, Ludmil B -- Gundem, Gunes -- Tarpey, Patrick S -- Roerink, Sophie -- Blokker, Joyce -- Maddison, Mark -- Mudie, Laura -- Robinson, Ben -- Nik-Zainal, Serena -- Campbell, Peter -- Goldman, Nick -- van de Wetering, Marc -- Cuppen, Edwin -- Clevers, Hans -- Stratton, Michael R -- 077012/Z/05/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 092096/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 104151/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- WT100183MA/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2014 Sep 18;513(7518):422-5. doi: 10.1038/nature13448. Epub 2014 Jun 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK [2] Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2XY, UK. ; 1] Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, CancerGenomiCs.nl &University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CT, Utrecht, The Netherlands [2] [3] Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QN, UK. ; 1] Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, CancerGenomiCs.nl &University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CT, Utrecht, The Netherlands [2]. ; Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK. ; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK. ; Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, CancerGenomiCs.nl &University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CT, Utrecht, The Netherlands. ; 1] Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK [2] East Anglian Medical Genetics Service, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043003" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Biological Clocks/genetics ; Cell Division ; Cell Lineage/*genetics ; Cells, Cultured ; Clone Cells/*cytology/*metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/cytology ; Genome/*genetics ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mutagenesis/*genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Mutation Rate ; Organoids/cytology/metabolism ; Phylogeny ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Tail/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-08-16
    Description: All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, 'kataegis', is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3776390/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3776390/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Alexandrov, Ludmil B -- Nik-Zainal, Serena -- Wedge, David C -- Aparicio, Samuel A J R -- Behjati, Sam -- Biankin, Andrew V -- Bignell, Graham R -- Bolli, Niccolo -- Borg, Ake -- Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise -- Boyault, Sandrine -- Burkhardt, Birgit -- Butler, Adam P -- Caldas, Carlos -- Davies, Helen R -- Desmedt, Christine -- Eils, Roland -- Eyfjord, Jorunn Erla -- Foekens, John A -- Greaves, Mel -- Hosoda, Fumie -- Hutter, Barbara -- Ilicic, Tomislav -- Imbeaud, Sandrine -- Imielinski, Marcin -- Jager, Natalie -- Jones, David T W -- Jones, David -- Knappskog, Stian -- Kool, Marcel -- Lakhani, Sunil R -- Lopez-Otin, Carlos -- Martin, Sancha -- Munshi, Nikhil C -- Nakamura, Hiromi -- Northcott, Paul A -- Pajic, Marina -- Papaemmanuil, Elli -- Paradiso, Angelo -- Pearson, John V -- Puente, Xose S -- Raine, Keiran -- Ramakrishna, Manasa -- Richardson, Andrea L -- Richter, Julia -- Rosenstiel, Philip -- Schlesner, Matthias -- Schumacher, Ton N -- Span, Paul N -- Teague, Jon W -- Totoki, Yasushi -- Tutt, Andrew N J -- Valdes-Mas, Rafael -- van Buuren, Marit M -- van 't Veer, Laura -- Vincent-Salomon, Anne -- Waddell, Nicola -- Yates, Lucy R -- Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative -- ICGC Breast Cancer Consortium -- ICGC MMML-Seq Consortium -- ICGC PedBrain -- Zucman-Rossi, Jessica -- Futreal, P Andrew -- McDermott, Ultan -- Lichter, Peter -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Grimmond, Sean M -- Siebert, Reiner -- Campo, Elias -- Shibata, Tatsuhiro -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Campbell, Peter J -- Stratton, Michael R -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 093867/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- T32 CA009216/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Aug 22;500(7463):415-21. doi: 10.1038/nature12477. Epub 2013 Aug 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23945592" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/genetics ; Algorithms ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/*genetics/pathology ; Cytidine Deaminase/genetics ; DNA/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Humans ; Models, Genetic ; Mutagenesis/*genetics ; Mutagenesis, Insertional/genetics ; Mutagens/pharmacology ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neoplasms/enzymology/*genetics/pathology ; Organ Specificity ; Reproducibility of Results ; Sequence Deletion/genetics ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-08-02
    Description: Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (L1) retrotransposons are mobile repetitive elements that are abundant in the human genome. L1 elements propagate through RNA intermediates. In the germ line, neighboring, nonrepetitive sequences are occasionally mobilized by the L1 machinery, a process called 3' transduction. Because 3' transductions are potentially mutagenic, we explored the extent to which they occur somatically during tumorigenesis. Studying cancer genomes from 244 patients, we found that tumors from 53% of the patients had somatic retrotranspositions, of which 24% were 3' transductions. Fingerprinting of donor L1s revealed that a handful of source L1 elements in a tumor can spawn from tens to hundreds of 3' transductions, which can themselves seed further retrotranspositions. The activity of individual L1 elements fluctuated during tumor evolution and correlated with L1 promoter hypomethylation. The 3' transductions disseminated genes, exons, and regulatory elements to new locations, most often to heterochromatic regions of the genome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380235/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380235/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tubio, Jose M C -- Li, Yilong -- Ju, Young Seok -- Martincorena, Inigo -- Cooke, Susanna L -- Tojo, Marta -- Gundem, Gunes -- Pipinikas, Christodoulos P -- Zamora, Jorge -- Raine, Keiran -- Menzies, Andrew -- Roman-Garcia, Pablo -- Fullam, Anthony -- Gerstung, Moritz -- Shlien, Adam -- Tarpey, Patrick S -- Papaemmanuil, Elli -- Knappskog, Stian -- Van Loo, Peter -- Ramakrishna, Manasa -- Davies, Helen R -- Marshall, John -- Wedge, David C -- Teague, Jon W -- Butler, Adam P -- Nik-Zainal, Serena -- Alexandrov, Ludmil -- Behjati, Sam -- Yates, Lucy R -- Bolli, Niccolo -- Mudie, Laura -- Hardy, Claire -- Martin, Sancha -- McLaren, Stuart -- O'Meara, Sarah -- Anderson, Elizabeth -- Maddison, Mark -- Gamble, Stephen -- ICGC Breast Cancer Group -- ICGC Bone Cancer Group -- ICGC Prostate Cancer Group -- Foster, Christopher -- Warren, Anne Y -- Whitaker, Hayley -- Brewer, Daniel -- Eeles, Rosalind -- Cooper, Colin -- Neal, David -- Lynch, Andy G -- Visakorpi, Tapio -- Isaacs, William B -- van't Veer, Laura -- Caldas, Carlos -- Desmedt, Christine -- Sotiriou, Christos -- Aparicio, Sam -- Foekens, John A -- Eyfjord, Jorunn Erla -- Lakhani, Sunil R -- Thomas, Gilles -- Myklebost, Ola -- Span, Paul N -- Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise -- Richardson, Andrea L -- Van de Vijver, Marc -- Vincent-Salomon, Anne -- Van den Eynden, Gert G -- Flanagan, Adrienne M -- Futreal, P Andrew -- Janes, Sam M -- Bova, G Steven -- Stratton, Michael R -- McDermott, Ultan -- Campbell, Peter J -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 091730/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 14835/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- C5047/A14835/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- G0900871/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P30 CA006973/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- WT100183MA/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Department of Health/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Aug 1;345(6196):1251343. doi: 10.1126/science.1251343.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. ; Department of Physiology, School of Medicine-Center for Resesarch in Molecular Medicine and Chronic Diseases, Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. ; Lungs for Living Research Centre, Rayne Institute, University College London (UCL), London, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. Human Genome Laboratory, Department of Human Genetics, VIB and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. Cambridge University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ; University of Liverpool and HCA Pathology Laboratories, London, UK. ; Cambridge University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. ; Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ; Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, London, UK. University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. ; Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, London, UK. ; Institute of Biosciences and Medical Technology-BioMediTech, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. ; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. ; Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ; Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory, Institut Jules Bordet, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. ; British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. ; Cancer Research Laboratory, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. ; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Pathology Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. UQ Centre for Clinical Research, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. ; Universite Lyon 1, Institut National du Cancer (INCa)-Synergie, Lyon, France. ; Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ; Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Laboratory Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands. ; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands. ; Institut Bergonie, 229 cours de l'Argone, 33076 Bordeaux, France. Institut Curie, Department of Tumor Biology, 26 rue d'Ulm, 75248 Paris cedex 05, France. ; Translational Cancer Research Unit and Department of Pathology, GZA Hospitals, Antwerp, Belgium. ; Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Middlesex, UK. UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. Cambridge University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. pc8@sanger.ac.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25082706" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Carcinogenesis/genetics ; Chromatin/chemistry ; *DNA Transposable Elements ; Exons ; Genome, Human ; Humans ; *Long Interspersed Nucleotide Elements ; Mutagenesis, Insertional ; Neoplasms/*genetics ; *Transduction, Genetic ; Translocation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...