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  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; TRIAL ; hormone ; HEALTH ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; PH ; WEIGHT ; body weight ; fat distribution ; HEIGHT ; ADIPOSITY ; breast neoplasm ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; METAANALYSIS
    Abstract: The evidence for anthropometric factors influencing breast cancer risk is accumulating, but uncertainties remain concerning the role of fat distribution and potential effect modifiers. We used data from 73,542 premenopausal and 103,344 postmenopausal women from 9 European countries, taking part in the EPIC study. RRs from Cox regression models were calculated, using measured height, weight, BMI and waist and hip circumferences; categorized by cohort wide quintiles; and expressed as continuous variables, adjusted for study center, age and other risk factors. During 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,879 incident invasive breast cancers were identified. In postmenopausal women, current HRT modified the body size-breast cancer association. Among nonusers, weight, BMI and hip circumference were positively associated with breast cancer risk (all P-trend less than or equal to 0.002); obese women (BMI 〉 30) had a 31% excess risk compared to women with BMI 〈 25. Among HRT users, body measures were inversely but nonsignificantly associated with breast cancer. Excess breast cancer risk with HRT was particularly evident among lean women. Pooled RRs per height increment of 5 cm were 1.05 (95% CI 1.00-1.16) in premenopausal and 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16) in postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal women, hip circumference was the only other measure significantly related to breast cancer (P-trend = 0.03), after accounting for BMI. In postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones, general obesity is a significant predictor of breast cancer, while abdominal fat assessed as waist-hip ratio or waist circumference was not related to excess risk when adjusted for BMI. Among premenopausal women, weight and BMI showed nonsignificant inverse associations with breast cancer. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15252848
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  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; proliferation ; tumor ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; RELEASE ; PATIENT ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; SOMATOSTATIN ; CANCER PATIENTS ; nutrition ; FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; IGF-I ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; cell proliferation ; development ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; GENOTYPE DATA ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; IGFBP3 ; insulin-like growth factor ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; SERUM-LEVELS
    Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates cell proliferation and can enhance the development of tumors in different organs. Epidemiologic studies have shown that an elevated level of circulating IGF-I is associated to increased risk of breast cancer as well as other cancers. Genetic variants affecting the release or biological action of growth hormone (GH), the main stimulator of IGF-I production, may predict circulating levels of IGF-I and have an effect on cancer risk. We tested this hypothesis with a large case-control study of 807 breast cancer patients and 1,588 matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We genotyped 22 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in 10 genes involved in GH production and action (GHRH, GHRHR, SST, SSTR1-SSTR5, POU1F1, and GH1), and in parallel, we measured serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, its major binding protein, in samples of cases and controls. SST and SSTR2 polymorphisms showed weak but statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. SSTR5 polymorphisms were associated with IGF-I levels, whereas one polymorphism in GHRHR and one in POU1F1 were associated with IGFBP-3 levels. Our conclusion is that common genetic variation in the GH synthesis pathway, as measured by single nucleotide polymorphisms selected in the present study, is not a major determinant of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 circulating levels, and it does not play a major role in altering breast cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16214911
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; PATIENT ; RISK-FACTORS ; BINDING ; CYCLE ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; ESTROGEN ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; ADRENAL ANDROGENS ; ESTROGEN PLUS PROGESTIN ; FEMALE NOBLE RATS ; HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; HORMONE LEVELS ; ONE-YEAR PERIOD ; REPLACEMENT THERAPY
    Abstract: Background. Contrasting etiologic hypotheses about the role of endogenous sex steroids in breast cancer development among premenopausal women implicate ovarian androgen excess and progesterone deficiency, estrogen excess, estrogen and progesterone excess, and both an excess or lack of adrenal androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA] or its sulfate [DHEAS]) as risk factors. We conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort to examine associations among premenopausal serum concentrations of sex steroids and subsequent breast cancer risk. Methods: Levels of DHEAS, (Delta 4-)androstenedione, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in single prediagnostic serum samples from 370 premenopausal women who subsequently developed breast cancer (case patients) and from 726 matched cancer-free control subjects. Levels of progesterone, estrone, and estradiol were also measured for the 285 case patients and 555 matched control subjects who had provided information about the day of menstrual cycle at blood donation. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate relative risks of breast cancer by quartiles of hormone concentrations. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Increased risks of breast cancer were associated with elevated serum concentrations of testosterone (odds ratio [OR] for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16 to 2.57; P-trend =.01), androstenedione (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.569 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.32; P-trend =.01), and DHEAS (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.14; P-trend =.10) but not SHBG. Elevated serum progesterone concentrations were associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.98; P-trend =.06). The absolute risk of breast cancer for women younger than 40 followed up for 10 years was estimated at 2.6% for those in the highest quartile of serum testosterone versus 1.5% for those in the lowest quartile; for the highest and lowest quartiles of progesterone, these estimates were 1.7% and 2.6%, respectively. Breast cancer risk was not statistically significantly associated with serum levels
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15900045
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; IMMUNOASSAYS ; immunoassay ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; dehydroepiandrosterone ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; EPIC PROJECT ; LEVEL ; methods ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; alcohol consumption ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; prospective ; BINDING GLOBULIN ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; intake ; steroids ; HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; alcohol intake ; ESTRADIOL LEVELS ; post-menopausal women ; pre-menopausal ; SERUM HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; sex steroids
    Abstract: Objective Women with a moderate intake of alcohol have higher concentrations of sex steroids in serum, and higher risk of developing breast cancer, compared to non-drinkers. In the present study, we investigate the relationships between alcohol consumption and serum levels of sex steroids and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in 790 pre- and 1,291 post-menopausal women, who were part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods Serum levels of testosterone (T), androstenedione (Delta(4)), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estrone (E-1), estradiol (E-2) and SHBG were measured by direct immunoassays. Free T (fT) and free E-2 (fE(2)) were calculated according to mass action laws. Current alcohol intake exposure to alcohol was assessed from dietary questionnaires. Results Pre-menopausal women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol had about 30% higher DHEAS, T and fT, 20% higher Delta(4) and about 40% higher E-1, concentrations compared to women who were non-consumers. E-2, fE(2) and SHBG concentrations showed no association with current alcohol intake. In post-menopausal women, DHEAS, fT, T, Delta(4), and E-1 concentrations were between 10% and 20% higher in women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol compared to non-consumers. E-2 or fE(2) were not associated with alcohol intake at all. SHBG levels were about 15% lower in alcohol consumers compared to non-consumers. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis of an influence of alcohol intake on sex hormone concentrations in blood
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16933054
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; THERAPY ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; hormone ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; cancer risk ; FIBER ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; DIET ; DIETARY ; FAT ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; AUSTRALIA ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; RELATIVE RISK ; dietary fiber ; insulin ; IGF-I ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ENDOMETRIAL ; THERAPIES ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; USA ; prospective ; INSULIN SENSITIVITY ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; FOODS ; Nutrition Assessment ; postmenopausal ; DIANA RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; dietary carbohydrates ; endometrial neoplasms ; glycemic index ; IOWA WOMENS HEALTH
    Abstract: The associations of dietary total carbohydrates, overall glycemic index, total dietary glycemic load, total sugars, total starch, and total fiber with endometrial cancer risk were analyzed among 288,428 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (1992-2004), including 710 incident cases diagnosed during a mean 6.4 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant associations with endometrial cancer risk for increasing quartile intakes of any of the exposure variables. However, in continuous models calibrated by using 24-hour recall values, the multivariable relative risks were 1.61 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.45) per 100 g/day of total carbohydrates, 1.40 (95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.99) per 50 units/day of total dietary glycemic load, and 1.36 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.76) per 50 g/day of total sugars. These associations were stronger among women who had never used postmenopausal hormone therapy compared with ever users (total carbohydrates P-heterogeneity = 0.04). Data suggest no association of overall glycemic index, total starch, and total fiber with risk, and a possible modest positive association of total carbohydrates, total dietary glycemic load, and total sugars with risk, particularly among never users of hormone replacement therapy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17670911
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; MODEL ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; tumour ; ASSOCIATION ; PROGRESSION ; resistance ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; HIGH-LEVEL ; leptin ; insulin ; IGF-I ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY ; development ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; USA ; prospective ; prospective study ; STEROID-HORMONES ; odds ratio ; C-PEPTIDE ; ANDROGEN ; prostatic neoplasms ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; GENERAL-POPULATION ; insulin resistance ; FASTING GLUCOSE ; TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS ; blood glucose ; META-REGRESSION ANALYSIS ; SERUM LEPTIN LEVELS
    Abstract: Factors related to insulin resistance have been implicated in prostate cancer development, however, few analytical studies support such an association. We performed a case control study on 392 prostate cancer cases and 392 matched controls nested in a prospective cohort in Northern Sweden. Plasma concentrations of C-peptide, leptin, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting and post-load glucose were analysed and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) of prostate cancer. High levels of C-peptide, HOMA-IR, leptin and HbA1c were associated with significant decreases in risk of prostate cancer, with ORs for top vs. bottom quartile for C-peptide of 0.59 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.40-0.89; p(trend) = 0.008), HOMA-IR 0.60 (95% CI, 0.38-0.94; p(trend) = 0.03), leptin 0.55 (95% CI, 0.36-0.84; p(trend) = 0.006) and HbA1c 0.56 (95% CI, 0.35-0.91; p(trend) = 0.02). All studied factors were strongly inversely related to risk among men less than 59 years of age at blood sampling, but not among older men, with a significant heterogeneity between the groups for leptin (p(heterogeneity) = 0.006) and fasting glucose (p(heterogeneity) = 0.03). C-peptide and HOMA-IR were strongly inversely related to non-aggressive cancer but were non-significantly positively related to risk of aggressive disease (p(heterogeneity) = 0.007 and 0.01, respectively). Our data suggest that androgens, which are inversely associated with insulin resistance, are important in the early prostate cancer development, whereas insulin resistance related factors may be important for tumour progression. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17278097
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; DEATH ; incidence ; RISK ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; INFECTION ; DOWN-REGULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; MOLECULE ; NO ; PROGRESSION ; DIFFERENCE ; PROMOTER ; MUTATION ; smoking ; RATES ; FRANCE ; MUTATIONS ; ADHESION ; case-control studies ; ADHESION MOLECULE ; EPIC ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; METHYLATION ; E-cadherin ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; RE ; INCREASE ; gastric cancer ; PROMOTER POLYMORPHISM ; HAPLOTYPE ; prospective ; Helicobacter pylori ; ENGLAND ; block ; GENE POLYMORPHISMS ; GENE POLYMORPHISM ; POSITION ; gastric adenocarcinoma ; CDH1 ; E-CADHERIN GENE
    Abstract: Despite declining incidence rates, gastric cancer (GC) is a major cause of death worldwide. E-Cadherin is an adhesion molecule that is thought to be involved in GC. Germline mutations in the E-Cadherin gene (CDH1) have been identified in hereditary diffuse GC. Also, a promoter polymorphism at position 160 C/A has been suggested to lead to transcriptional down regulation and has been shown to affect GC risk in some studies. However, very little information exists on the GC risk association of other CDH1 polymorphisms and it is unclear whether any associations may be different by GC anatomical sites or histological types. Thus, a case-control study (cases = 245/controls = 950) nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort was conducted to assess the GC risk association of eight CDH1 gene polymorphisms. None of the CDH1 polymorphisms or haplotypes analysed were associated with GC risk and no differences of effect were observed by Helicobacter pylori infection status. However, three CDH1 polymorphisms in the same haplotype block, including the CDH1-160C/A, interacted with smoking to increase GC risk in smokers but not in never smokers. These findings should be confirmed in larger independent studies. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18342503
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MARKER ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FRANCE ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; GLUCOSE ; nutrition ; BETA-CELL FUNCTION ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; INCREASE ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; USA ; prospective ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; NOV ; HEMOGLOBIN ; TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; CHRONIC OXIDATIVE STRESS ; GLUCOSE TOXICITY ; RECTAL CANCERS ; SERUM C-PEPTIDE
    Abstract: Although large-scale prospective cohort studies have related hyperglycemia to increased risk of cancer overall, studies specifically on colorectal cancer have been generally small. We investigated the association between prediagnostic levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a marker for average glucose level in blood, and colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One thousand and twenty-six incident colorectal cancer cases (561 men and 465 women) and 1,026 matched controls were eligible for the study. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORS) adjusted for possible confounders. Increasing HbA1c percentages were statistically significantly associated with a mild increase in colorectal cancer risk in the whole population [OR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01,1.19 for a 10% increase in HbA1c]. In women, increasing HbA1c percentages were associated with a statistically significant increase in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.32 for a 10% increase in HbA1c) and with a borderline statistically significant increase in rectum cancer (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.99,1.50 for a 10% increase in HbA1c). No significant association with cancer risk was observed in men. The results of the current study suggest a mild implication of hyperglycemia in colorectal cancer, which seems more important in women than in men, and more for cancer of the rectum than of the colon. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3108-15)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990751
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; BLOOD ; DENSITY ; COHORT ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; GENE ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TISSUE ; primary ; RISK-FACTORS ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; CARE ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; SNP ; risk factors ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; BINDING-PROTEINS ; NETHERLANDS ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; menopause ; SERUM ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; INCREASE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; ALLELES ; LEVEL ; methods ; HAPLOTYPE ; GENOTYPE DATA ; USA ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; prospective study ; mammographic density ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; Insulin-Like Growth Factor I ; NOV ; postmenopausal ; quantitative ; block ; breast density ; IGF1 ; breast cancer risk ; NUCLEOTIDE ; APOLIPOPROTEIN-E ISOFORMS ; Prospect-EPIC
    Abstract: Introduction High breast density is one of the strongest known risk factors for developing breast cancer. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a strong mitogen and has been suggested to increase breast cancer risk by increasing the amount of dense tissue in the female breast. Objectives We wanted to investigate the effect of common variation in the IGF-1 gene on serum IGF-I levels and on breast density. Design and methods Mammograms and blood samples of 1,928 premenopausal participants of the Dutch Prospect-EPIC cohort were collected at baseline. Using a haplotype tagging approach, 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from three blocks covering the IGF-1 gene were genotyped in all study participants. Breast density was assessed using a quantitative computer-assisted method. For a subgroup of women, who went through menopause within 5 years after recruitment (n = 656), premenopausal IGF-I levels and additionally postmenopausal breast density were determined. False positive report probabilities (FPRP) for statistically significant relations were calculated using the Wacholder method. Results The minor alleles of five SNPs in block 3 were significantly associated with elevated levels of IGF-I (rs9989002, rs2033178, rs7136446, rs978458, rs6220; P-values: 0.01-0.04). The same SNPs were related with modestly higher percent breast density before menopause and-in the subgroup of women that became postmenopausal during follow-up-with a modestly higher percent breast density after menopause. The most significant result, i.e. the relation between rs6220 and IGF-I levels, had an FPRP 〈 0.5 assuming prior probabilities of 0.01 and higher. Conclusion Common genetic variation in the IGF-1 gene is related to circulating levels of IGF-I, but the relationship with breast density is indecisive
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18064566
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; DISEASE ; POPULATION ; validation ; COMPLEX ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACID ; PLASMA ; MEN ; CENTERS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FOOD-INTAKE ; nutrient intake ; SERUM PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; prospective ; biological markers ; INVESTIGATE ; PROCESSED FOODS
    Abstract: Background: Plasma phospholipid fatty acids have been correlated with food intakes in populations with homogeneous dietary patterns. However, few data are available on populations with heterogeneous dietary patterns. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of dietary intakes across populations involved in a large European multicenter study. Design: A cross-sectional study design nested to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) was conducted to determine plasma fatty acid profiles in 〉 3000 subjects from 16 centers, who had also completed 24-h dietary recalls and dietary questionnaires. Plasma fatty acids were assessed by capillary gas chromatography. Ecological and individual correlations were calculated between fatty acids and select food groups. Results: The most important determinant of plasma fatty acids was region, which suggests that the variations across regions are largely due to different food intakes. Strong ecological correlations were observed between fish intake and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = 0.78, P 〈 0.01), olive oil and oleic acid (r = 0.73, P 〈 0.01), and margarine and elaidic acid (r = 0.76, P 〈 0.01). Individual correlations varied across the regions, particularly between olive oil and oleic acid and between alcohol and the saturation index, as an indicator of stearoyl CoA desaturase activity. Conclusions: These findings indicate that specific plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of some food intakes in the EPIC Study. Moreover, these findings suggest complex interactions between alcohol intake and fatty acid metabolism, which warrants further attention in epidemiologic studies relating dietary fatty acids to alcohol-related cancers and other chronic diseases. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89: 331-46
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19056549
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