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  • 1
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    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Call number: QZ200:575(3)/1
    Keywords: Neoplasms ; DKFZ-publications
    Notes: Contributor: Michael Baumann
    Pages: xl, 585 p. : ill.
    Edition: 3rd ed.
    ISBN: 9780128124840
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    QZ200:575(3)/1 available
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  • 2
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    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Call number: QZ200:575(3)/2
    Keywords: Neoplasms ; DKFZ-publications
    Notes: Contributor: Michael Baumann
    Pages: xl, 577 p. : ill.
    Edition: 3rd ed.
    ISBN: 9780128124840
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    QZ200:575(3)/2 available
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  • 3
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    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Call number: QZ200:575(3)/3
    Keywords: Neoplasms ; DKFZ-publications
    Notes: Contributor: Michael Baumann
    Pages: xl, 605 p. : ill.
    Edition: 3rd ed.
    ISBN: 9780128124840
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    QZ200:575(3)/3 available
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  • 4
    Call number: QZ203:91
    Keywords: Dust / adverse effects ; Neoplasms / etiology ; Occupational Exposure / adverse effects ; Wood
    Pages: iii, 97 p.
    ISBN: 9283214447
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    QZ203:91 available
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  • 5
    Keywords: Medicine ; Oncology ; Biomedicine ; Cancer Research ; Medicine/Public Health, general ; Biomedicine general ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Introduction -- Principles of primary and secondary cancer prevention -- The global burden of neoplasms -- Distribution, causes and prevention of individual neoplasms -- Overview of the causes of human cancer -- Conclusions -- References -- Index
    Abstract: A Quick Guide to Cancer Epidemiology℗ is an ideal℗ addition to Springer Briefs in Cancer Research. The Brief℗ provides core concepts in cancer epidemiology and also gives℗ a snapshot of the epidemiology of seventeen human cancers.℗ The Brief℗ aims to provide-with quantitative focus-estimates of the global burden℗ of neoplasms, of recent and likely future trends, distribution,℗ causes and strategies℗ for prevention for major groups of cancers. Finally, the Brief will give an overview of severals factors that cause cancer including dietary factors, tobacco smoking, obesity and alcohol consumption
    Pages: IX, 101 p. 12 illus., 3 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9783319050683
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  • 6
    Call number: G260:3
    Keywords: Neoplasms / ethnology ; Neoplasms / epidemiology ; Developing Countries ; Socioeconomic Factors
    Description / Table of Contents: Burden of cancer in low- and middle-income countries / Maria Paula Curado ... [et al.] -- Migrant studies / Song-Yi Park and Laurence N. Kolonel -- Opportunities for molecular pathology research / Kelly Hirko, Maria Iniesta Donate, Sofia Merajver -- Opportunities in genetic epidemiology in developing countries / Dominique Sighoko ... [et al.] -- Cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries / Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan ... [et al.] -- Behavioral, social, and cultural aspects of epidemiologic studies in low- and middle-income countries and in special populations / Robert M. Chamberlain -- Ethical issues in cancer epidemiologic studies / Steven S. Coughlin -- Case-control studies in low- and middle-income countries : opportunities and challenges / Farin Kamangar, Kyle Esdaille, Farhad Islami -- Cohort studies in low- and middle-income countries / Stephanie Melkonian, Yu Chen, Habibul Ahsan -- Molecular epidemiology in low- and middle-income countries / Hongbing Shen and Hongxia Ma -- Methodological issues in international multicentric studies, including the role of consortia in international cancer epidemiology / Farhad Islami and Paolo Boffetta -- Cancer epidemiology research training in LMI countries and special populations : needs and opportunities / Amr S. Soliman -- Cancer epidemiology in schools of public health and medical schools : culture, infrastructure, and curricula / Amr S. Soliman -- University resources for academic and field research training in cancer epidemiology / Amr S. Soliman and Robert M. Chamberlain -- Non-university training programs in cancer epidemiology, emphasizing participation from low- and middle-income countries / Jessica M. Fapeol-Badger -- Needs and opportunities for epidemiologic training of early-career clinicians and scientists seeking to conduct cancer research in low- and middle-income countries / Amr S. Soliman and Robert M. Chamberlain -- Hepatitis B virus, aflatoxin and primary liver cancer / W. Thomas London, Timothy M. Block, Katherine A. McGlynn -- National Cancer Institute-- Costa Rica studies on Human Papilloma Virus and cervical cancer / Rolando Herrero -- Studies of tobacco smoking and control / Priscilla S. Reddy ... [et al.] -- HIV and cancer in less developed countries / Sam M. Mbulaiteye -- Breast cancer early detection and clinical guidelines / David B. Thomas ... [et al.] -- Emerging opportunities and challenges / Amr S. Soliman, David Schottenfeld, and Paulo Boffetta
    Pages: xviii, 422 p. : ill.
    ISBN: 9780199733507
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    G260:3 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-1246
    Keywords: Key words Exposure ; Epidemiology ; Pulp industry ; Paper industry ; Data base
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract An international data base of exposure measurements in the pulp, paper and paper product industries was constructed to be used in exposure assessment for epidemiology studies and hazard control. Industrial hygiene and biological monitoring data were collected from countries participating in the multicentric study of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Each measurement was characterized by country, mill type and number, department, job, agent measured, sampling method, measurement result in the standard unit, duration and date of sampling, assessment of representativeness, measurer, purpose of measurements, and remarks (e.g. on measurement sites and biases). Over 31,000 measurement results on 246 different chemical agents from 13 countries were available from pulp (45% of measurements), paper/paperboard/recycling (12%) and paper product (11%) mills or from their non-production departments (23%). Most measurements (82%) were carried out after 1980. The most frequently measured group of agents was inorganic gases (35%), followed by organic compounds (25%), solvents (18%), mineral dusts (12%), metals (6%) and bioaerosols (3%). Over 90% of the measurements were without an obvious bias, but their true representativeness is difficult to assess. Concentrations of various agents, including sulfur dioxide, chlorine dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, ammonia, formaldehyde and some solvents, often exceeded current occupational exposure limits. This data base summarizes a great deal of previously unpublished exposure data, provides a unique opportunity to study exposure patterns at the international level and identifies exposure situations that require further attention and investigation.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: Bladder cancer ; lung cancer ; occupational exposures ; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ; skin cancer
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Epidemiologic evidence on the relationship between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and cancer is reviewed. High occupational exposure to PAHs occurs in several industries and occupations. Covered here are aluminum production, coal gasification, coke production, iron and steel foundries, tar distillation, shale oil extraction, wood impregnation, roofing, road paving, carbon black production, carbon electrode production, chimney sweeping, and calcium carbide production. In addition, workers exposed to diesel engine exhaust in the transport industry and in related occupations are exposed to PAHs and nitro-PAHs. Heavy exposure to PAHs entails a substantial risk of lung, skin, and bladder cancer, which is not likely to be due to other carcinogenic exposures present in the same industries. The lung seems to be the major target organ of PAH carcinogenicity and increased risk is present in most of the industries and occupations listed above. An increased risk of skin cancer follows high dermal exposure. An increase in bladder cancer risk is found mainly in industries with high exposure to PAHs from coal tars and pitches. Increased risks have been reported for other organs, namely the larynx and the kidney; the available evidence, however, is inconclusive. The results of studies addressing environmental PAH exposure are consistent with these conclusions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: diet ; lung cancer ; non-smokers
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Objective: We have examined the role of dietary patterns and specific dietary nutrients in the etiology of lung cancer among non-smokers using a multicenter case–control study. Methods: 506 non-smoking incident lung cancer cases were identified in the eight centers along with 1045 non-smoking controls. Dietary habits were assessed using a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire administered by personal interview. Based on this information, measures of total carotenoids, beta-carotene and retinol nutrient intake were estimated. Results: Protective effects against lung cancer were observed for high consumption of tomatoes, (odds ratio (OR) = 0.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4–0.6), lettuce (OR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.3–1.2), carrots (OR = 0.8; 95% CI 0.5–1.1), margarine (OR = 0.7; 95% CI 0.5–0.8) and cheese (OR = 0.7; 95% CI 0.5–1.0). Only weak protective effects were observed for high consumption of all carotenoids (OR = 0.8; 95% CI 0.6–1.0), beta-carotene (OR=0.8; 95% CI 0.6–1.1) and retinol (OR = 0.9; 95% CI 0.7–1.1). Protective effects for high levels of fruit consumption were restricted to squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 0.7; 95% CI 0.4–1.2) and small cell carcinoma (OR = 0.7; 95% CI 0.4–1.2), and were not apparent for adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.9; 95% CI 0.6–1.3). Similarly, any excess risk associated with meat, butter and egg consumption was restricted to squamous and small cell carcinomas, but was not detected for adenocarcinomas. Conclusions: This evidence suggests that the public health significance of increasing vegetable consumption among the bottom third of the population would include a reduction in the incidence of lung cancer among lifetime non-smokers by at least 25%, and possibly more. A similar protective effect for increased fruit consumption may be present for squamous cell and small cell lung carcinomas.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: bladder cancer ; coffee consumption ; nonsmokers
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Background: Coffee consumption has been associated with an excess bladder cancer risk, but results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. This association has been long debated, in part due to the potential confounding by smoking. We examined the risk associated with coffee consumption in nonsmokers in a pooled analysis of ten European bladder cancer case–control studies. Methods: The pooled data set comprises 564 cases and 2929 hospital or population controls who had never smoked. They were enrolled in ten studies conducted in Denmark, Germany, Greece, France, Italy and Spain. Information on coffee consumption and occupation was re-coded following standard criteria. Unconditional logistic regression was applied adjusting for age, study center, occupation and gender. Results: Seventy-nine percent of the study population reported having drunk coffee, and 2.4% were heavy drinkers, reporting having drunk on average ten or more cups per day. There was no excess risk in ever coffee drinkers (OR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.8–1.3) compared to never drinkers. The risk did not increase monotonically with dose but a statistically significant excess risk was seen for subjects having drunk ten or more cups per day (OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.3). This excess was seen in both men and women. There was no evidence of an association of the risk with duration or type of coffee consumption. The pooled results were not dependent on the findings of any specific study, but they depended on the type of controls with an overall excess risk observed only for studies using hospital controls. Conclusion: Nonsmokers who are heavy coffee drinkers may have a small excess risk of bladder cancer. Although these results cannot be attributed to confounding by smoking, the possibility of bias in control selection cannot be discarded. On the basis of these results, only a very small proportion of cancers of the bladder among nonsmokers could be attributed to coffee drinking.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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