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  • 1
    ISSN: 1600-0501
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: This study examined in vitro the existence of microbial leakage along the components of the Brånemark® implant system. Thirty-two implant/abutment assemblies were installed in a liquid blood medium previously inoculated with oral micro-organisms. To examine the leakage at the implant abutment interface, 16 assemblies were partially immersed. The remaining 16 were completely immersed to observe the leakage at both the implant abutment and abutment-prosthesis interface. After 7 days of an-aerobic incubation, the micro-organisms in the internal part of the implants were collected and incubated on blood agar plates in anaerobic conditions. Micro-organisms were found in the completely immersed assemblies and at lower numbers in the partially immersed implants, indicating that bacterial leakage at both levels seems to exist. Several penetrating bacteria have been associated with peri-implantitis. The clinical importance of this bacterial leakage is not yet well understood. Although the longevity of the Brånemark® implants is well documented, this bacterial leakage might play a role in peri-implantitis. both in the etiology as well as in the treatment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract In the oral cavity, an open growth system, bacterial adhesion to the non-shedding surfaces is for most bacteria the only way to survive. This adhesion occurs in 4 phases: the transport of the bacterium to the surface, the initial adhesion with a reversible and irreversible stage, the attachment by specific interactions, and finally the colonization in order to form a biofilm. Different hard surfaces are available in the oral cavity (teeth, filling materials, dental implants, or prostheses), all with different surface characteristics. In a healthy situation, a dynamic equilibrium exists on these surfaces between the forces of retention and those of removal. However, an increased bacterial accumulation often results in a shift toward disease. 2 mechanisms favour the retention of dental plaque: adhesion and stagnation. The aim of this review is to examine the influence of the surface roughness and the surface free energy in the adhesion process. Both in vitro and in vivo studies underline the importance of both variables in supragingival plaque formation. Rough surfaces will promote plaque formation and maturation, and high-energy surfaces are known to collect more plaque, to bind the plaque more strongly and to select specific bacteria. Although both variables interact with each other, the influence of surface roughness overrules that of the surface free energy. For the subgingival environment, with more facilities for microorganisms to survive, the importance of surface characteristics dramatically decreases. However, the influence of surface roughness and surface-free energy on supragingival plaque justifies the demand for smooth surfaces with a low surface-free energy in order to minimise plaque formation, thereby reducing the occurrence of caries and periodontitis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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