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  • 1
    Call number: WN180:9(2) ; G901:11
    Keywords: Diagnostic Imaging ; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted ; Surgery, Computer-Assisted ; User-Computer Interface ; Computer graphics
    Description / Table of Contents: Acquisition of medical image data -- An introduction to medical visualization in clinical practice -- Image analysis for medical visualization -- Human-computer interaction for medical visualization -- Surface rendering -- Direct volume visualization -- Advanced direct volume visualization -- Volume interaction -- Labeling and measurements in medical visualization -- Visualization of vascular structures -- Illustrative medical visualization -- Virtual endoscopy -- Projections and reformations -- Visualization of brain connectivity -- Visual exploration and analysis of perfusion data -- Computer-assisted surgery -- Image-guided surgery and augmented reality -- Visual exploration of simulated and measured flow data -- Visual computing for ENT surgery planning -- Visualization for medical education
    Notes: Preceded by Visualization in medicine / Berhard Preim, Dirk Bartz. 2007.
    Pages: xxiii, 812 p. : ill.
    Edition: Second edition.
    ISBN: 9780124158733
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    WN180:9(2) available
    G901:11 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 2
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Deutscher Kongress für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie; 71. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie, 93. Tagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Orthopädie und Orthopädische Chirurgie, 48. Tagung des Berufsverbandes der Fachärzte für Orthopädie; 20071024-20071027; Berlin; DOCW11-1444 /20071009/
    Publication Date: 2007-10-10
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy
    Abstract: During radiation therapy of the female breast, the actual target volume compared to the planning target volume may change due to swelling or shrinking of the tissue. Under-or overdosage is to be expected, especially when performing IMRT or tomotherapy techniques. The objective of this study is to develop a model-based quantification of these dose effects, with a particular focus on the changes in the surface dose. A cylindrical phantom was used as an artificial surrogate of the human torso. By adding and removing Superflab layers of various thicknesses, both radial breast swelling and shrinking could be simulated. The effects on dose distribution were evaluated using film dosimetry. The results were compared to dose calculations. To estimate the true surface doses, we subtracted the influence of the film material on air measurements. During a swelling of 5, 10, and 15 mm, the planning target volume was consistently underdosed by 2%, 5%, and 7% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Swelling led to reduced dose values of up to 72%, 55%, and 50% at the outer edge of the actual target volume. The measured surface dose decreased successively from 31% to 23%. During shrinking, the dose in the planning target volume increased successively from 100% to 106%. The measured surface doses increased from 29% to 36%. The calculated dose values agreed with the measured values within error limits. During radiotherapy of the female breast, new planning appears to be essential for radial tissue swelling of 5 mm or more because of severe underdosing. Shrinking leads to moderate overdosing and an increased surface dose. In addition, caution is advised when removing bolus material with respect to the planned situation.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-11-26
    Description: The determination of protein crystal structures is hampered by the need for macroscopic crystals. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) provide extremely intense pulses of femtosecond duration, which allow data collection from nanometre- to micrometre-sized crystals in a 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach. So far, all protein structure determinations carried out using FELs have been based on previous knowledge of related, known structures. Here we show that X-ray FEL data can be used for de novo protein structure determination, that is, without previous knowledge about the structure. Using the emerging technique of serial femtosecond crystallography, we performed single-wavelength anomalous scattering measurements on microcrystals of the well-established model system lysozyme, in complex with a lanthanide compound. Using Monte-Carlo integration, we obtained high-quality diffraction intensities from which experimental phases could be determined, resulting in an experimental electron density map good enough for automated building of the protein structure. This demonstrates the feasibility of determining novel protein structures using FELs. We anticipate that serial femtosecond crystallography will become an important tool for the structure determination of proteins that are difficult to crystallize, such as membrane proteins.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Barends, Thomas R M -- Foucar, Lutz -- Botha, Sabine -- Doak, R Bruce -- Shoeman, Robert L -- Nass, Karol -- Koglin, Jason E -- Williams, Garth J -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Schlichting, Ilme -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 9;505(7482):244-7. doi: 10.1038/nature12773. Epub 2013 Nov 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; 1] Max-Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504, USA. ; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24270807" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chickens ; Crystallization ; Crystallography/*methods ; *Electrons ; Female ; Gadolinium ; *Lasers ; Membrane Proteins/chemistry ; Models, Molecular ; Monte Carlo Method ; Muramidase/chemistry ; Protein Conformation ; Proteins/*chemistry ; Time Factors ; X-Ray Diffraction/*methods ; *X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-08-09
    Description: During the past few years, serial crystallography methods have undergone continuous development and serial data collection has become well established at high-intensity synchrotron-radiation beamlines and XFEL radiation sources. However, the application of experimental phasing to serial crystallography data has remained a challenging task owing to the inherent inaccuracy of the diffraction data. Here, a particularly gentle method for incorporating heavy atoms into micrometre-sized crystals utilizing lipidic cubic phase (LCP) as a carrier medium is reported. Soaking in LCP prior to data collection offers a new, efficient and gentle approach for preparing heavy-atom-derivative crystals directly before diffraction data collection using serial crystallography methods. This approach supports effective phasing by utilizing a reasonably low number of diffraction patterns. Using synchrotron radiation and exploiting the anomalous scattering signal of mercury for single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS) phasing resulted in high-quality electron-density maps that were sufficient for building a complete structural model of proteinase K at 1.9 Å resolution using automatic model-building tools.
    Keywords: serial crystallographySIRAS phasinglipidic cubic phaseheavy-atom soakingde novo protein structure determination
    Electronic ISSN: 2052-2525
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-02-15
    Description: Introduction In Australia, societal and individual preferences for funding fertility treatment remain largely unknown. This has resulted in a lack of evidence about willingness to pay (WTP) for fertility treatment by either the general population (the funders) or infertile individuals (who directly benefit). Using a stated preference discrete choice experiment (SPDCE) approach has been suggested as a more appropriate method to inform economic evaluations of fertility treatment. We outline the protocol for an ongoing study which aims to assess fertility treatment preferences of both the general population and infertile individuals, and indirectly estimate their WTP for fertility treatment. Methods and analysis Two separate but related SPDCEs will be conducted for two population samples—the general population and infertile individuals—to elicit preferences for fertility treatment to indirectly estimate WTP. We describe the qualitative work to be undertaken to design the SPDCEs. We will use D-efficient fractional experimental designs informed by prior coefficients from the pilot surveys. The mode of administration for the SPDCE is also discussed. The final results will be analysed using mixed logit or latent class model. Ethics and dissemination This study is being funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) project grant AP1104543 and has been approved by the University of New South Wales Human Research Ethics Committee (HEC 17255) and a fertility clinic’s ethics committee. Findings of the study will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and presented at various conferences. A lay summary of the results will be made publicly available on the University of New South Wales National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit website. Our results will contribute to the development of an evidence-based policy framework for the provision of cost-effective and patient-centred fertility treatment in Australia.
    Keywords: Open access, Health economics
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-09-12
    Description: The hemoprotein myoglobin is a model system for the study of protein dynamics. We used time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an x-ray free-electron laser to resolve the ultrafast structural changes in the carbonmonoxy myoglobin complex upon photolysis of the Fe-CO bond. Structural changes appear throughout the protein within 500 femtoseconds, with the C, F, and H helices moving away from the heme cofactor and the E and A helices moving toward it. These collective movements are predicted by hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations. Together with the observed oscillations of residues contacting the heme, our calculations support the prediction that an immediate collective response of the protein occurs upon ligand dissociation, as a result of heme vibrational modes coupling to global modes of the protein.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Barends, Thomas R M -- Foucar, Lutz -- Ardevol, Albert -- Nass, Karol -- Aquila, Andrew -- Botha, Sabine -- Doak, R Bruce -- Falahati, Konstantin -- Hartmann, Elisabeth -- Hilpert, Mario -- Heinz, Marcel -- Hoffmann, Matthias C -- Kofinger, Jurgen -- Koglin, Jason E -- Kovacsova, Gabriela -- Liang, Mengning -- Milathianaki, Despina -- Lemke, Henrik T -- Reinstein, Jochen -- Roome, Christopher M -- Shoeman, Robert L -- Williams, Garth J -- Burghardt, Irene -- Hummer, Gerhard -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Schlichting, Ilme -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Oct 23;350(6259):445-50. doi: 10.1126/science.aac5492. Epub 2015 Sep 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Planck-Institut fur Medizinische Forschung, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. thomas.barends@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de ilme.schlichting@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de. ; Max-Planck-Institut fur Medizinische Forschung, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Max-Planck-Institut fur Biophysik, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ; European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; Institut fur Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Goethe-Universitat, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 7, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ; Max-Planck-Institut fur Biophysik, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Institut fur Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Goethe-Universitat, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 7, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ; Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26359336" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1573-6776
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Abstract Cellulase from Penicillium funiculosum exhibited different hydrolysis tendencies when acting on cellulose materials. Successive addition of fresh cellulase to enzymatic pre-treated substrates showed foolscap paper to be the most susceptible for enzymatic hydrolysis followed by filter paper, newsprint and microcrystalline cellulose.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Protoplasma 109 (1981), S. 217-231 
    ISSN: 1615-6102
    Keywords: Anatomy ; Artemisia ; Cell wall composition ; Compositae ; Phloem ; Sieve element
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary The structure of the phloem was studied in stem and leaf ofArtemisia afra Jacq., with particular attention being given to the sieve element walls. Both primary and secondary sieve elements of stem and midvein have nacreous walls, which persist in mature cells. Histochemical tests indicated that the sieve element wall layers contained some pectin. Sieve element wall layers lack lignin. Sieve elements of the minor veins (secondary and tertiary veins) lack nacreous thickening, although their walls may be relatively thick. These walls and those of contiguous transfer cells are rich in pectic substances. Transfer cell wall ingrowths are more highly developed in tertiary than in secondary veins.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1615-6102
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Seventy-four of 83 stylet tracks, and 20 of 22 pairs of stylets of the aphid,Rhopalosiphum maidis were observed terminating in abaxial phloem of matureCucurbita maxima leaves. These results indicate that the abaxial phloem is more important in vein loading and the export of assimilates from mature leaves than the adaxial phloem.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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