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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; questionnaires ; VEGETABLES ; NUTRIENTS ; carotenoids ; DIETARY FACTORS ; DETERMINANTS ; SUBTYPE ; FRUITS ; PART ; PARTICIPANTS ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; ALLIUM VEGETABLES ; FOOD GROUPS
    Abstract: Objective: The association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of ovarian cancer is still unclear from a prospective point of view. Methods: Female participants (n = 325,640) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, free of any cancer at baseline, were followed on average for 6.3 years to develop ovarian cancer. During 2,049,346 person-years, 581 verified cases of primary, invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were accrued. Consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as subgroups of vegetables, estimated from validated dietary questionnaires and calibrated thereafter, was related to ovarian cancer incidence in multivariable hazard regression models. Histologic subtype specific analyses were done. Results: Total intake of fruit and vegetables, separately or combined, as well as subgroups of vegetables (fruiting, root, leafy vegetables, cabbages) was unrelated to risk of ovarian cancer. A high intake of garlic/onion vegetables was associated with a borderline significant reduced risk of this cancer. The examination by histologic subtype indicated some differential effects of fruit and vegetable intake on ovarian cancer risk. Conclusion: Overall, a high intake of fruits and vegetables did not seem to protect from ovarian cancer. Garlic/onion vegetables may exert a beneficial effect. The study of the histologic subtype of the tumor warrants further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16284374
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; COHORT ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; RELATIVE RISK ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; fruits and vegetables ; prospective ; prospective study ; RECOMMENDATIONS ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCERS ; VARIABLES ; root vegetables ; SUBGROUPS ; upper aero-digestive cancer
    Abstract: Epidemiologic studies suggest that a high intake of fruits and vegetables is associated with decreased risk of cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract. We studied data from 345,904 subjects of the prospective European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) recruited in seven European countries, who had completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-1998. During 2,182,560 person years of observation 352 histologically verified incident squamous cell cancer (SCC) cases (255 males; 97 females) of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus were identified. Linear and restricted cubic spline Cox regressions were fitted on variables of intake of fruits and vegetables and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed a significant inverse association with combined total fruits and vegetables intake (estimated relative risk (RR) = 0.91; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.83-1.00 per 80 g/d of consumption), and nearly significant inverse associations in separate analyses with total fruits and total vegetables intake (RR: 0.97 (95% CI: 0.92-1.02) and RR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.78-1.02) per 40 g/d of consumption). Overall, vegetable subgroups were not related to risk with the exception of intake of root vegetables in men. Restricted cubic spline regression did not improve the linear model fits except for total fruits and vegetables and total fruits with a significant decrease in risk at low intake levels (〈 120 g/d) for fruits. Dietary recommendations should consider the potential benefit of increasing fruits and vegetables consumption for reducing the risk of cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract, particularly at low intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16841263
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  • 3
    Keywords: ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; score ; PATTERNS ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; FISH ; REGION ; DIET ; FAT ; INDIVIDUALS ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; HETEROGENEITY ; REGRESSION ; PRODUCTS ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; ADIPOSITY ; metabolic syndrome ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; USA ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; BMI ; FOODS ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; DAIRY-PRODUCTS ; EPIC-OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; WEIGHT-LOSS ; Abdominal ; ABDOMINAL ADIPOSITY ; ELDERLY-PEOPLE ; HEALTH-STATUS ; TO-HIP RATIO
    Abstract: Given the lack of consistent evidence of the relationship between Mediterranean dietary patterns and body fat, we assessed the cross-sectional association between adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, BMI, and waist circumference (WC). A total of 497,308 individuals (70.7% women) aged 25-70 y from 10 European countries participated in this study. Diet was assessed at baseline using detailed validated country-specific questionnaires, and anthropometrical measurements were collected using standardized procedures. The association between the degree of adherence to the modified-Mediterranean Diet Score (mMDS) (including high consumption of vegetables, legumes, fruits and nuts, cereals, fish and seafood, and unsaturated: saturated fatty acids ratio; moderate alcohol intake; and low consumption of meat and meat products and dairy products) and BMI (kg.m(-2)) or WC (cm was modeled through mixed-effects linear regression, controlling for potential confounders. Overall, the mMDS was not significantly associated with BMI. Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was significantly associated with lower WC, for a given BMI, in both men (-0.09; 95% CI -0.14 to -0.04) and women (-0.06; 95% CI -0.10 to -0.01). The association was stronger in men (-0.20; 95% CI -0.23 to -0.17) and women (-0.17; 95% CI -0.21 to -0.13) from Northern European countries. Despite the observed heterogeneity among regions, results of this study suggest that adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, high in foods of vegetable origin and unsaturated fatty acids, is associated with lower abdominal adiposity measured by WC in European men and women. J. Nutr. 139: 1728-1737, 2009
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19571036
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; INTERVENTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; FAT ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; CALIBRATION ; MANAGEMENT ; physical activity ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; WEIGHT ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; LOW-CARBOHYDRATE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; dietary patterns ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL ; Lead ; Follow up ; weight gain ; OBESE ADULTS ; PLASMA LEPTIN ; PROTEIN DIET
    Abstract: Background: Meat intake may be related to weight gain because of its high energy and fat content. Some observational studies have shown that meat consumption is positively associated with weight gain, but intervention studies have shown mixed results. Objective: Our objective was to assess the association between consumption of total meat, red meat, poultry, and processed meat and weight gain after 5 y of follow-up, on average, in the large European population who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Design: A total of 103,455 men and 270,348 women aged 25-70 y were recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Diet was assessed at baseline with the use of country-specific validated questionnaires. A dietary calibration study was conducted in a representative subsample of the cohort. Weight and height were measured at baseline and self-reported at follow-up in most centers. Associations between energy from meat (kcal/d) and annual weight change (g/y) were assessed with the use of linear mixed models, controlled for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, dietary patterns, and other potential confounders. Results: Total meat consumption was positively associated with weight gain in men and women, in normal-weight and overweight subjects, and in smokers and nonsmokers. With adjustment for estimated energy intake, an increase in meat intake of 250 g/d (eg, one steak at approximate to 450 kcal) would lead to a 2-kg higher weight gain after 5 y (95% CI: 1.5, 2.7 kg). Positive associations were observed for red meat, poultry, and processed meat. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a decrease in meat consumption may improve weight management. Am J Clin Nutr 2010; 92: 398-407
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20592131
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; RECRUITMENT ; nutrition ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; Epidemiologic studies
    Abstract: Background: Previous epidemiologic studies found inconsistent results for the association between red meat intake, nitrosamines [NDMA: N-nitrosodimethylamine, and ENOC (endogenous nitroso compounds)], and the risk of bladder cancer. We investigated the association between red meat consumption, dietary nitrosamines, and heme iron and the risk of bladder cancer among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Data on food consumption and complete follow-up for cancer occurrence were available for a total of 481,419 participants, recruited in 10 European countries. Estimates of HRs were obtained by proportional hazard models, stratified by age at recruitment, gender, and study center and adjusted for total energy intake, smoking status, lifetime intensity of smoking, duration of smoking, educational level, and BMI. Results: After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 1,001 participants were diagnosed with bladder cancer. We found no overall association between intake of red meat (log(2) HR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.99-1.13), nitrosamines (log(2) HR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.92-1.30 and HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.92-1.05 for ENOC and NDMA, respectively) or heme iron (log(2) HR: 1.05; 95 CI: 0.99-1.12) and bladder cancer risk. The associations did not vary by sex, high-versus low-risk bladder cancers, smoking status, or occupation (high vs. low risk). Conclusions: Our findings do not support an effect of red meat intake, nitrosamines (endogenous or exogenous), or heme iron intake on bladder cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21239687
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; LIFE-STYLE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; COFFEE ; DRINKING-WATER ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; FLUID ; LOWER URINARY-TRACT ; DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS ; urothelial cell carcinomas
    Abstract: Results from previous studies investigating the association between fluid intake and urothelial cell carcinomas (UCC) are inconsistent. We evaluated this association among 233,236 subjects in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), who had adequate baseline information on water and total fluid intake. During a mean follow-up of 9.3 years, 513 first primary UCC occurred. At recruitment, habitual fluid intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression stratified by age, sex and center and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, duration of smoking and lifetime intensity of smoking. When using the lowest tertile of intake as reference, total fluid intake was not associated with risk of all UCC (HR 1.12; 95% CI 0.86-1.45, p-trend = 0.42) or with risk of prognostically high-risk UCC (HR 1.28; 95% CI 0.85-1.93, p-trend = 0.27) or prognostically low-risk UCC (HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.65-1.33, p-trend = 0.74). No associations were observed between risk of UCC and intake of water, coffee, tea and herbal tea and milk and other dairy beverages. For prognostically low-risk UCC suggestions of an inverse association with alcoholic beverages and of a positive association with soft drinks were seen. Increased risks were found for all UCC and prognostically low-risk UCC with higher intake of fruit and vegetable juices. In conclusion, total usual fluid intake is not associated with UCC risk in EPIC. The relationships observed for some fluids may be due to chance, but further investigation of the role of all types of fluid is warranted
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20715171
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort study ; RISK ; SITE ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; WOMEN ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; CARDIA ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; case-control study ; INCREASE ; case control studies ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; prospective ; Helicobacter pylori ; intake ; FOODS
    Abstract: It is considered that fruit and vegetable (F&V) protect against oesophagus and gastric cancer (GC). However, 2 recent meta-analyses suggest that the strength of association on GC seems to he weaker for vegetables than for fruit and weaker in cohort than in case-control studies. No evidence exists from cohort studies about adenocarcinoma of oesophagus (ACO). In 521,457 men and women participating in the EPIC cohort in 10 European countries, information of diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After an average of 6.5 years of follow-up, a total of 330 GC and 65 ACO, confirmed and classified by a panel of pathologists, was used for the analysis. We examined the relation between F&V intake and GC and ACO. A calibration study in a sub-sample was used to control diet measurement errors. In a sub-sample of cases and a random sample of controls, antibodies against Helicobacter pylori (Hp) were measured and interactions with F&V were examined in a nested case-control study. We observed no association with total vegetable intake or specific groups of vegetables and GC risk, except for the intestinal type, where a negative association is possible regarding total vegetable (calibrated HR 0.66; 95% CI 0.35-1.22 per 100 g increase) and onion and garlic intake (calibrated HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.38-1.29 per 10 g increase). No evidence of association between fresh fruit intake and GC risk was observed. We found a negative but non significant association between citrus fruit intake and the cardia site (calibrated HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.47-1.22 per 100 g increase) while no association was observed with the non-cardia site. Regarding ACO, we found a non significant negative association for vegetable intake and for citrus intake (calibrated HRs 0.72; 95% Cl 0.32-1.64 and 0.77; 95% CI 0.46-1.28 per 100 and 50 g increase, respectively). It seems that lip infection does not modify the effect of F&V intake. Our study supports a possible protective role of vegetable intake in the intestinal type of GC and the ACO. Citrus fruit consumption may have a role in the protection against cardia GC and ACO. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16380980
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; PLASMA ; ENERGY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; DIETARY ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; BODY ; CARDIA ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; ESOPHAGUS ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; HIGH-LEVEL ; carotenoids ; MASS INDEX ; SERUM ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; INCREASE ; gastric cancer ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; HORMONES ; prospective ; prospective study ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-RISK ; carcinogenic ; Helicobacter pylori ; EXCLUSION ; processed meat ; ANTIOXIDANT VITAMINS ; JUICE ASCORBIC-ACID
    Abstract: Vitamin C is an antioxidant and inhibitor of carcinogenic N-nitroso compound production in the stomach. Higher dietary vitamin C consumption is associated with decreased risk of gastric cancer (GC) in numerous case-control studies, but data from prospective studies are limited, particularly so for blood measures of vitamin C. The objective of this study was to determine the association of plasma and dietary vitamin C levels with the risk of GC in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a large cohort involving 10 European countries. Using a fluorometric method, vitamin C was measured in pre-diagnostic plasma from 215 GC cases (matched controls = 416). Conditional logistic regression models adjusted by body mass index, total energy intake, smoking status/duration/intensity and Helicobacter pylori infection status were used to estimate relative cancer risks. No association with GC risk was observed for dietary vitamin C, whereas an inverse GC risk was observed in the highest versus lowest quartile of plasma vitamin C [odds ratio (OR) = 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.31-0.97, P-trend = 0.043], which was maintained after exclusion of cases with 〈= 2 years follow-up (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.19-0.83, P-trend = 0.064). The inverse association was more pronounced in subjects consuming higher levels of red and processed meats, a factor that may increase endogenous N-nitroso compound production. The effect of plasma vitamin C was not different by GC anatomical subsite (cardia/non-cardia) or histological subtype (diffuse/intestinal), and there was no significant interaction of effect with H.pylori. The results of this study show, in a prospective setting, an inverse association of GC risk with high levels of plasma vitamin C and suggest an interaction with the intake of red and processed meats, whose consumption may elevate endogenous N-nitroso compound production
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16774936
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; evaluation ; Germany ; LUNG ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; FREQUENCIES ; NO ; smoking ; cancer risk ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; MULTIVARIATE ; DIET ; INDIVIDUALS ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; LIFE-STYLE ; BETA-CAROTENE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; ONCOLOGY ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; INCREASE ; NONSMOKING WOMEN ; VITAMIN-C ; pooled analysis ; USA ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; comparison ; ERROR ; CHINESE WOMEN ; DIETARY CAROTENOIDS
    Abstract: The association of fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer incidence was evaluated using the most recent data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), applying a refined statistical approach (calibration) to account for measurement error potentially introduced by using food frequency questionnaire data. Between 1992 and 2000, detailed information on diet and life-style of 478,590 individuals participating in EPIC was collected. During a median follow-up of 6.4 years, 1,126 lung cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were applied for statistical evaluation. In the whole study population, fruit consumption was significantly inversely associated with lung cancer risk while no association was found for vegetable consumption. In current smokers, however, lung cancer risk significantly decreased with higher vegetable consumption; this association became more pronounced after calibration, the hazard ratio (HR) being 0.78 (95% CI 0.620.98) per 100 g increase in daily vegetable consumption. In comparison, the HR per 100 g fruit was 0.92 (0.85-0.99) in the entire cohort and 0.90 (0.81-0.99) in smokers. Exclusion of cases diagnosed during the first 2 years of follow-up strengthened these associations, the HR being 0.71 (0.55-0.94) for vegetables (smokers) and 0.86 (0.78-0.95) for fruit (entire cohort). Cancer incidence decreased with higher consumption of apples and pears (entire cohort) as well as root vegetables (smokers). In addition to an overall inverse association with fruit intake, the results of this evaluation add evidence for a significant inverse association of vegetable consumption and lung cancer incidence in smokers. (C) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17487840
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COMMON ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; TIME ; MARKER ; primary ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; ACID ; NO ; HEALTH ; PLASMA ; AGE ; etiology ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; STOMACH-CANCER ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; VARIANT ; INCREASE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; prospective studies ; gastric cancer ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; MTHFR ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; case control studies ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; GENOTYPE ; LOCUS ; single-nucleotide ; USA ; C677T POLYMORPHISM ; prospective ; prospective study ; INCREASED RISK ; odds ratio ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; CHINESE POPULATION ; nested case-control study ; case control ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION ; PLASMA-CONCENTRATION ; chronic atrophic gastritis ; gastric ; pepsinogen ; MTHFR POLYMORPHISMS ; 5,10-METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; EPIC-EURGAST ; MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSAY
    Abstract: Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations of folate intake and polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with gastric cancer risk. Our nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort is the first prospective study of blood folate levels and gastric cancer. Gastric cancer cases (n = 247) and controls (n = 631) were matched for study center, age, sex, and time of blood donation. Two common single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MTHFR gene were determined, as were plasma concentrations of folate, cobalamin (vitamin B12), total homocysteine, and methylmalonic acid (cobalamin deficiency marker) in prediagnostic plasma. Risk measures were calculated with conditional logistic regression. Although no relations were observed between plasma folate or total homocysteine concentrations and gastric cancer, we observed a trend toward lower risk of gastric cancer with increasing cobalamin concentrations (odds ratio, 0.79 per SD increase in cobalamin; P = 0.01). Further analyses showed that the inverse association between cobalamin and gastric cancer was confined to cancer cases with low pepsinogen A levels (marker of severe chronic atrophic gastritis) at the time of blood sampling. The 677 C -〉 T MTHFR polymorphism was not associated with gastric cancer, but we observed an increased risk with the variant genotype of the 1298 A -〉 C polymorphism (odds ratio, 1.47 for CC versus AA; P = 0.04). In conclusion, we found no evidence of a role of folate in gastric cancer etiology. However, we observed increased gastric cancer risk at low cobalamin levels that was most likely due to compromised cobalamin status in atrophic gastritis preceding gastric cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18006931
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