Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: Colon cancer ; men ; physical activity ; United States
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Previous studies indicate that physical activity is related inverselyto colon cancer risk. However, details regarding that association - whether adose-response relation exists, whether the relation differs between non-obeseand obese persons, the effect of long-term physical activity - are unclear.We examined these issues in the Physicians‘ Health Study (United States).Physical activity was assessed at baseline among 21,807 men, aged 40 to 84years, and again 36 months later. Men were followed for an average of 10.9years (from baseline) during which 217 developed colon cancer. Afteradjusting for potential confounders (including age, obesity, and alcoholintake), the relative risks for colon cancer associated with vigorousexercise in times per week (〈 1, 1, 2-4, 5+, at baseline) were 1.0(referent); 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7-1.7); 1.2 (CI = 0.8-1.6);and 1.1 (CI = 0.7-1.6), respectively; P trend = 0.6. Physical activity wasnot associated significantly with colon cancer risk either among non-obese orobese men. When we used physical activity assessments at baseline as well asat 36 months, physical activity again was unrelated to colon cancer risk.These data do not support the hypothesis that physical activity reduces therisk of colon cancer. Plausible alternate explanations for the null findinginclude misclassification of physical activity and the potential forincreased surveillance for colon cancer (‘screening effect’) among thosephysically active.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: beta-carotene ; neoplasms ; prevention ; randomized trial
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Objectives: The Physicians' Health Study (PHS) was a randomized trial of beta-carotene (50 mg, alternate days) and aspirin in primary prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease among 22,071 US male physicians. This report updates results for beta-carotene and examines effect modification by baseline characteristics. Methods: Beta-carotene's effect on cancer over nearly 13 years was examined overall and within subgroups defined by baseline characteristics using proportional-hazards models. Results: 2667 incident cancers were confirmed, with 1117 prostate, 267 colon, and 178 lung cancers. There were no significant differences with supplementation in total (relative risk (RR) = 1.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.9–1.0); prostate (RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.9–1.1); colon (RR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.7–1.2); or lung (RR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.7–1.2) cancer, and no differences over time. In subgroup analyses, total cancer was modestly reduced with supplementation among those aged 70+ years (RR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.7–1.0), daily drinkers of alcohol (RR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.8–1.0), and those in the highest BMI quartile (RR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.7–1.0). Prostate cancer was reduced with supplementation among those in the highest BMI quartile (RR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.6–1.0), and colon cancer was reduced among daily drinkers of alcohol (RR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3–0.8). Conclusions: The PHS found no overall effect of beta-carotene on total cancer, or the three most common site-specific cancers. The possibility of risk reduction within specific subgroups remains.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, N.Y. : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 59 (1995), S. 226-230 
    ISSN: 0730-2312
    Keywords: Antioxidants ; β-carotene ; chemoprevention ; randomized trials ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: Evidence supports the potential role of β-carotene in cancer prevention. Basic research has demonstrated that β-carotene can trap organic free radicals and/or deactivate excited oxygen molecules which may have an anticancer effect by preventing tissue damage. Although observational edpidemiologic studies are not entirely consistent, many show an inverse association between dietary intake or blood levels of β-carotene and subsequent cancer risk. Two large-scale randomized trials of β-carotene have been completed. A Finnish trial demonstrated no benefit of β-carotene among middle-aged male smokers, with those assigned to this supplement in fact experiencing an increased risk of lung cancer. However, because of the long latency period for cancer, which may be a decade or more, the six-year duration of treatment in this trial may ghave been inadequate to detect an anticancer effect. A Chinese trial demonstrated a modest reduction in cancer mortality from a combined regimen of β-carotene, vitamin E, and selenium. The effect of the individual agents could not be assessed, and because the trial was carried out among a nutritionally deficient population, its results may not have direct relevance to well-nourished individuals. Several additional large-scale trials of β-carotene are ongoing. The Physicians' Health Study, which is testing β-carotene among 22, 071 US male physicians, will have an average duration of treatment of 12.5 years at its scheduled termination in late 1995. Data in women will be available from the Women's Health Study, which beganin 1992, and will randomize approximately 40,000 US female health professionals. The results from these and other ongoing trials are necessary to determine conclusively whether β-carotene reduces risks of cancer.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    ISSN: 1749-6632
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1749-6632
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...