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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-05-26
    Description: Tumors exhibit numerous recurrent hemizygous focal deletions that contain no known tumor suppressors and are poorly understood. To investigate whether these regions contribute to tumorigenesis, we searched genetically for genes with cancer-relevant properties within these hemizygous deletions. We identified STOP and GO genes, which negatively and positively regulate proliferation, respectively. STOP genes include many known tumor suppressors, whereas GO genes are enriched for essential genes. Analysis of their chromosomal distribution revealed that recurring deletions preferentially overrepresent STOP genes and underrepresent GO genes. We propose a hypothesis called the cancer gene island model, whereby gene islands encompassing high densities of STOP genes and low densities of GO genes are hemizygously deleted to maximize proliferative fitness through cumulative haploinsufficiencies. Because hundreds to thousands of genes are hemizygously deleted per tumor, this mechanism may help to drive tumorigenesis across many cancer types.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4027969/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4027969/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Solimini, Nicole L -- Xu, Qikai -- Mermel, Craig H -- Liang, Anthony C -- Schlabach, Michael R -- Luo, Ji -- Burrows, Anna E -- Anselmo, Anthony N -- Bredemeyer, Andrea L -- Li, Mamie Z -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Elledge, Stephen J -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32GM07753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54CA143798/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jul 6;337(6090):104-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1219580. Epub 2012 May 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics, Harvard University Medical School, and Division of Genetics, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22628553" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cell Line ; Cell Line, Tumor ; *Cell Proliferation ; *Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Chromosome Mapping ; Genes, Essential ; *Genes, Neoplasm ; Genes, Recessive ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; *Haploinsufficiency ; Hemizygote ; Humans ; Models, Genetic ; Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology ; Oncogenes ; *Sequence Deletion
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-06-19
    Description: Major international projects are underway that are aimed at creating a comprehensive catalogue of all the genes responsible for the initiation and progression of cancer. These studies involve the sequencing of matched tumour-normal samples followed by mathematical analysis to identify those genes in which mutations occur more frequently than expected by random chance. Here we describe a fundamental problem with cancer genome studies: as the sample size increases, the list of putatively significant genes produced by current analytical methods burgeons into the hundreds. The list includes many implausible genes (such as those encoding olfactory receptors and the muscle protein titin), suggesting extensive false-positive findings that overshadow true driver events. We show that this problem stems largely from mutational heterogeneity and provide a novel analytical methodology, MutSigCV, for resolving the problem. We apply MutSigCV to exome sequences from 3,083 tumour-normal pairs and discover extraordinary variation in mutation frequency and spectrum within cancer types, which sheds light on mutational processes and disease aetiology, and in mutation frequency across the genome, which is strongly correlated with DNA replication timing and also with transcriptional activity. By incorporating mutational heterogeneity into the analyses, MutSigCV is able to eliminate most of the apparent artefactual findings and enable the identification of genes truly associated with cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3919509/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3919509/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lawrence, Michael S -- Stojanov, Petar -- Polak, Paz -- Kryukov, Gregory V -- Cibulskis, Kristian -- Sivachenko, Andrey -- Carter, Scott L -- Stewart, Chip -- Mermel, Craig H -- Roberts, Steven A -- Kiezun, Adam -- Hammerman, Peter S -- McKenna, Aaron -- Drier, Yotam -- Zou, Lihua -- Ramos, Alex H -- Pugh, Trevor J -- Stransky, Nicolas -- Helman, Elena -- Kim, Jaegil -- Sougnez, Carrie -- Ambrogio, Lauren -- Nickerson, Elizabeth -- Shefler, Erica -- Cortes, Maria L -- Auclair, Daniel -- Saksena, Gordon -- Voet, Douglas -- Noble, Michael -- DiCara, Daniel -- Lin, Pei -- Lichtenstein, Lee -- Heiman, David I -- Fennell, Timothy -- Imielinski, Marcin -- Hernandez, Bryan -- Hodis, Eran -- Baca, Sylvan -- Dulak, Austin M -- Lohr, Jens -- Landau, Dan-Avi -- Wu, Catherine J -- Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge -- Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo -- Koren, Amnon -- McCarroll, Steven A -- Mora, Jaume -- Lee, Ryan S -- Crompton, Brian -- Onofrio, Robert -- Parkin, Melissa -- Winckler, Wendy -- Ardlie, Kristin -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Roberts, Charles W M -- Biegel, Jaclyn A -- Stegmaier, Kimberly -- Bass, Adam J -- Garraway, Levi A -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Golub, Todd R -- Gordenin, Dmitry A -- Sunyaev, Shamil -- Lander, Eric S -- Getz, Gad -- ES065073/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009172/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009216/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143845/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jul 11;499(7457):214-8. doi: 10.1038/nature12213. Epub 2013 Jun 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23770567" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Artifacts ; DNA Replication Timing ; Exome/genetics ; False Positive Reactions ; Gene Expression ; *Genetic Heterogeneity ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Mutation Rate ; Neoplasms/classification/*genetics/pathology ; Neoplasms, Squamous Cell/genetics ; Oncogenes/*genetics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Sample Size
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-01-07
    Description: Although a few cancer genes are mutated in a high proportion of tumours of a given type (〉20%), most are mutated at intermediate frequencies (2-20%). To explore the feasibility of creating a comprehensive catalogue of cancer genes, we analysed somatic point mutations in exome sequences from 4,742 human cancers and their matched normal-tissue samples across 21 cancer types. We found that large-scale genomic analysis can identify nearly all known cancer genes in these tumour types. Our analysis also identified 33 genes that were not previously known to be significantly mutated in cancer, including genes related to proliferation, apoptosis, genome stability, chromatin regulation, immune evasion, RNA processing and protein homeostasis. Down-sampling analysis indicates that larger sample sizes will reveal many more genes mutated at clinically important frequencies. We estimate that near-saturation may be achieved with 600-5,000 samples per tumour type, depending on background mutation frequency. The results may help to guide the next stage of cancer genomics.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4048962/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4048962/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lawrence, Michael S -- Stojanov, Petar -- Mermel, Craig H -- Robinson, James T -- Garraway, Levi A -- Golub, Todd R -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Lander, Eric S -- Getz, Gad -- R01 CA157304/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 23;505(7484):495-501. doi: 10.1038/nature12912. Epub 2014 Jan 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Massachusetts General Hospital, Cancer Center and Department of Pathology, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [3] Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [3] Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [4] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [4]. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Massachusetts General Hospital, Cancer Center and Department of Pathology, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA [3] Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [4].〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24390350" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Apoptosis/genetics ; Case-Control Studies ; Cell Proliferation ; Chromatin/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Exome/genetics ; Genes, Neoplasm/*genetics ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Genomic Instability/genetics ; Genomics ; Humans ; Immune Evasion/genetics ; Mutation Rate ; Neoplasms/*classification/*genetics/pathology ; Point Mutation/genetics ; RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics ; Sample Size
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-03-25
    Description: The most common mutation in human melanoma, BRAF(V600E), activates the serine/threonine kinase BRAF and causes excessive activity in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. BRAF(V600E) mutations are also present in benign melanocytic naevi, highlighting the importance of additional genetic alterations in the genesis of malignant tumours. Such changes include recurrent copy number variations that result in the amplification of oncogenes. For certain amplifications, the large number of genes in the interval has precluded an understanding of the cooperating oncogenic events. Here we have used a zebrafish melanoma model to test genes in a recurrently amplified region of chromosome 1 for the ability to cooperate with BRAF(V600E) and accelerate melanoma. SETDB1, an enzyme that methylates histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9), was found to accelerate melanoma formation significantly in zebrafish. Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with massively parallel DNA sequencing and gene expression analyses uncovered genes, including HOX genes, that are transcriptionally dysregulated in response to increased levels of SETDB1. Our studies establish SETDB1 as an oncogene in melanoma and underscore the role of chromatin factors in regulating tumorigenesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3348545/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3348545/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ceol, Craig J -- Houvras, Yariv -- Jane-Valbuena, Judit -- Bilodeau, Steve -- Orlando, David A -- Battisti, Valentine -- Fritsch, Lauriane -- Lin, William M -- Hollmann, Travis J -- Ferre, Fabrizio -- Bourque, Caitlin -- Burke, Christopher J -- Turner, Laura -- Uong, Audrey -- Johnson, Laura A -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- Mermel, Craig H -- Loda, Massimo -- Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane -- Garraway, Levi A -- Young, Richard A -- Zon, Leonard I -- CA103846/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA146455/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- DK055381/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- HG002668/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K08 DK075432/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08 DK075432-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08DK075432-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K99AR056899-02/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R00 AR056899/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R00 AR056899-02/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103846/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103846-09/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA146445/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA146445-03/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002668/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002668-08/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 24;471(7339):513-7. doi: 10.1038/nature09806.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Stem Cell Program and Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Boston, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21430779" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age of Onset ; Amino Acid Substitution ; Animals ; Animals, Genetically Modified ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1/genetics ; DNA Copy Number Variations/*genetics ; Disease Models, Animal ; Gene Amplification/*genetics ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Genes, Homeobox/genetics ; Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/*genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Melanocytes/cytology/enzymology/metabolism/pathology ; Melanoma/enzymology/*genetics/*pathology ; Nevus/enzymology ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Protein Methyltransferases/*genetics/*metabolism ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Zebrafish/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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