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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-05-25
    Description: The safety and efficacy of ibrutinib (420 mg) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were evaluated in a phase 2 study; 51 patients had TP53 aberration (TP53 cohort) and 35 were enrolled because of age 65 years or older (elderly cohort). Both cohorts included patients with treatment-naive (TN) and relapsed/refractory (RR) CLL. With the median follow-up of 4.8 years, 49 (57.0%) of 86 patients remain on study. Treatment was discontinued for progressive disease in 20 (23.3%) patients and for adverse events in 5 (5.8%). Atrial fibrillation occurred in 18 (20.9%) patients for a rate of 6.4 per 100 patient-years. No serious bleeding occurred. The overall response rate at 6 months, the primary study endpoint, was 95.8% for the TP53 cohort (95% confidence interval, 85.7%-99.5%) and 93.9% for the elderly cohort (95% confidence interval, 79.8%-99.3%). Depth of response improved with time: at best response, 14 (29.2%) of 48 patients in the TP53 cohort and 9 (27.3%) of 33 in the elderly cohort achieved a complete response. Median minimal residual disease (MRD) in peripheral blood was 3.8 x 10 –2 at 4 years, with MRD-negative (〈10 –4 ) remissions in 5 (10.2%) patients. In the TP53 cohort, the estimated 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 74.4% in TN-CLL compared with 19.4% in RR-CLL ( P = .0002), and overall survival (OS) was 85.3% vs 53.7%, respectively ( P = .023). In the elderly cohort, the estimated 5-year PFS and OS in RR-CLL were 64.8% and 71.6%, respectively, and no event occurred in TN-CLL. Long-term administration of ibrutinib was well tolerated and provided durable disease control for most patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01500733.
    Keywords: Lymphoid Neoplasia
    Print ISSN: 0006-4971
    Electronic ISSN: 1528-0020
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-10-09
    Description: The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) spike, comprising three gp120 and three gp41 subunits, is a conformational machine that facilitates HIV-1 entry by rearranging from a mature unliganded state, through receptor-bound intermediates, to a post-fusion state. As the sole viral antigen on the HIV-1 virion surface, Env is both the target of neutralizing antibodies and a focus of vaccine efforts. Here we report the structure at 3.5 A resolution for an HIV-1 Env trimer captured in a mature closed state by antibodies PGT122 and 35O22. This structure reveals the pre-fusion conformation of gp41, indicates rearrangements needed for fusion activation, and defines parameters of immune evasion and immune recognition. Pre-fusion gp41 encircles amino- and carboxy-terminal strands of gp120 with four helices that form a membrane-proximal collar, fastened by insertion of a fusion peptide-proximal methionine into a gp41-tryptophan clasp. Spike rearrangements required for entry involve opening the clasp and expelling the termini. N-linked glycosylation and sequence-variable regions cover the pre-fusion closed spike; we used chronic cohorts to map the prevalence and location of effective HIV-1-neutralizing responses, which were distinguished by their recognition of N-linked glycan and tolerance for epitope-sequence variation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4348022/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4348022/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pancera, Marie -- Zhou, Tongqing -- Druz, Aliaksandr -- Georgiev, Ivelin S -- Soto, Cinque -- Gorman, Jason -- Huang, Jinghe -- Acharya, Priyamvada -- Chuang, Gwo-Yu -- Ofek, Gilad -- Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E -- Stuckey, Jonathan -- Bailer, Robert T -- Joyce, M Gordon -- Louder, Mark K -- Tumba, Nancy -- Yang, Yongping -- Zhang, Baoshan -- Cohen, Myron S -- Haynes, Barton F -- Mascola, John R -- Morris, Lynn -- Munro, James B -- Blanchard, Scott C -- Mothes, Walther -- Connors, Mark -- Kwong, Peter D -- AI0678501/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI100645/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 GM056550/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P01-GM56550/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30 AI050410/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM098859/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM098859/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI100696/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21-AI100696/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000142/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- UM1 AI100645/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- ZIA AI005023-13/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA AI005024-13/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Oct 23;514(7523):455-61. doi: 10.1038/nature13808. Epub 2014 Oct 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; HIV-Specific Immunity Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Sandringham, Johannesburg 2131, South Africa. ; Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. ; Duke University Human Vaccine Institute, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics and Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, and the Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology-Immunogen Discovery at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. ; 1] Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Sandringham, Johannesburg 2131, South Africa [2] University of the Witwatersrand, Braamfontein, Johannesburg 2000, South Africa [3] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041, South Africa. ; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06536, USA. ; Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25296255" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: AIDS Vaccines/chemistry/immunology ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology ; Cohort Studies ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Genetic Variation ; Glycosylation ; HIV Antibodies/immunology ; HIV Envelope Protein gp120/*chemistry/genetics/*immunology ; HIV Envelope Protein gp41/*chemistry/genetics/*immunology ; HIV Infections/immunology ; Humans ; Immune Evasion ; Membrane Fusion ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polysaccharides/chemistry/immunology ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Quaternary ; Protein Subunits/chemistry/genetics/immunology ; Structural Homology, Protein ; Virus Internalization
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-05-27
    Description: Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a vital process for energy generation, and is carried out by complexes within the mitochondria. OXPHOS complexes pose a unique challenge for cells because their subunits are encoded on both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes. Genomic approaches designed to study nuclear/cytosolic and bacterial gene expression have not been broadly applied to mitochondria, so the co-regulation of OXPHOS genes remains largely unexplored. Here we monitor mitochondrial and nuclear gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during mitochondrial biogenesis, when OXPHOS complexes are synthesized. We show that nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS transcript levels do not increase concordantly. Instead, mitochondrial and cytosolic translation are rapidly, dynamically and synchronously regulated. Furthermore, cytosolic translation processes control mitochondrial translation unidirectionally. Thus, the nuclear genome coordinates mitochondrial and cytosolic translation to orchestrate the timely synthesis of OXPHOS complexes, representing an unappreciated regulatory layer shaping the mitochondrial proteome. Our whole-cell genomic profiling approach establishes a foundation for studies of global gene regulation in mitochondria.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Couvillion, Mary T -- Soto, Iliana C -- Shipkovenska, Gergana -- Churchman, L Stirling -- England -- Nature. 2016 May 11;533(7604):499-503. doi: 10.1038/nature18015.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225121" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from donor CAP256 (from the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)); each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulphated, anionic antigen-binding loop (complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30-38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth and potency occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation. These data provide important insights relevant to HIV-1 vaccine development.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4395007/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4395007/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Doria-Rose, Nicole A -- Schramm, Chaim A -- Gorman, Jason -- Moore, Penny L -- Bhiman, Jinal N -- DeKosky, Brandon J -- Ernandes, Michael J -- Georgiev, Ivelin S -- Kim, Helen J -- Pancera, Marie -- Staupe, Ryan P -- Altae-Tran, Han R -- Bailer, Robert T -- Crooks, Ema T -- Cupo, Albert -- Druz, Aliaksandr -- Garrett, Nigel J -- Hoi, Kam H -- Kong, Rui -- Louder, Mark K -- Longo, Nancy S -- McKee, Krisha -- Nonyane, Molati -- O'Dell, Sijy -- Roark, Ryan S -- Rudicell, Rebecca S -- Schmidt, Stephen D -- Sheward, Daniel J -- Soto, Cinque -- Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt -- Yang, Yongping -- Zhang, Zhenhai -- NISC Comparative Sequencing Program -- Mullikin, James C -- Binley, James M -- Sanders, Rogier W -- Wilson, Ian A -- Moore, John P -- Ward, Andrew B -- Georgiou, George -- Williamson, Carolyn -- Abdool Karim, Salim S -- Morris, Lynn -- Kwong, Peter D -- Shapiro, Lawrence -- Mascola, John R -- P01 AI082362/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI100790/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UM1 AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 1;509(7498):55-62. doi: 10.1038/nature13036. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA [2]. ; 1] Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa [2] Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050, South Africa [3] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa [4]. ; 1] Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa [2] Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050, South Africa. ; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA. ; Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Torrey Pines Institute, San Diego, California 92037, USA. ; Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa. ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. ; Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa. ; Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Division of Medical Virology, University of Cape Town and NHLS, Cape Town 7701, South Africa. ; Department of Biochemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] NISC Comparative Sequencing program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2] NIH Intramural Sequencing Center, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Department of Medical Microbiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [4] Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA [2] Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA [3] Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA. ; 1] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa [2] Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Division of Medical Virology, University of Cape Town and NHLS, Cape Town 7701, South Africa. ; 1] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa [2] Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa [2] Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050, South Africa [3] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa. ; 1] Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2] Department of Biochemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590074" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: AIDS Vaccines/chemistry/immunology ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry/genetics/*immunology/isolation & purification ; Antibody Affinity/genetics/immunology ; Antigens, CD4/immunology/metabolism ; B-Lymphocytes/cytology/immunology/metabolism ; Binding Sites/immunology ; Cell Lineage ; Complementarity Determining Regions/chemistry/genetics/immunology ; Epitope Mapping ; Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry/immunology ; Evolution, Molecular ; HIV Antibodies/chemistry/genetics/*immunology/isolation & purification ; HIV Envelope Protein gp160/*chemistry/*immunology ; HIV Infections/immunology ; HIV-1/chemistry/immunology ; Humans ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Neutralization Tests ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-11-02
    Description: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization for children under 5 years of age. We sought to engineer a viral antigen that provides greater protection than currently available vaccines and focused on antigenic site O, a metastable site specific to the prefusion state of the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, as this site is targeted by extremely potent RSV-neutralizing antibodies. Structure-based design yielded stabilized versions of RSV F that maintained antigenic site O when exposed to extremes of pH, osmolality, and temperature. Six RSV F crystal structures provided atomic-level data on how introduced cysteine residues and filled hydrophobic cavities improved stability. Immunization with site O-stabilized variants of RSV F in mice and macaques elicited levels of RSV-specific neutralizing activity many times the protective threshold.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4461862/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4461862/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉McLellan, Jason S -- Chen, Man -- Joyce, M Gordon -- Sastry, Mallika -- Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E -- Yang, Yongping -- Zhang, Baoshan -- Chen, Lei -- Srivatsan, Sanjay -- Zheng, Anqi -- Zhou, Tongqing -- Graepel, Kevin W -- Kumar, Azad -- Moin, Syed -- Boyington, Jeffrey C -- Chuang, Gwo-Yu -- Soto, Cinque -- Baxa, Ulrich -- Bakker, Arjen Q -- Spits, Hergen -- Beaumont, Tim -- Zheng, Zizheng -- Xia, Ningshao -- Ko, Sung-Youl -- Todd, John-Paul -- Rao, Srinivas -- Graham, Barney S -- Kwong, Peter D -- ZIA AI005024-11/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA AI005061-10/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Nov 1;342(6158):592-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1243283.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24179220" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology ; Antigens, Viral/*chemistry/genetics/immunology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cysteine/chemistry/genetics ; Glycoproteins/*chemistry/genetics/immunology ; Humans ; Macaca ; Mice ; Protein Engineering ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Stability ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/*prevention & control ; Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/*chemistry ; Vaccination ; Viral Fusion Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-05-14
    Description: The HIV-1 fusion peptide, comprising 15 to 20 hydrophobic residues at the N terminus of the Env-gp41 subunit, is a critical component of the virus-cell entry machinery. Here, we report the identification of a neutralizing antibody, N123-VRC34.01, which targets the fusion peptide and blocks viral entry by inhibiting conformational changes in gp120 and gp41 subunits of Env required for entry. Crystal structures of N123-VRC34.01 liganded to the fusion peptide, and to the full Env trimer, revealed an epitope consisting of the N-terminal eight residues of the gp41 fusion peptide and glycan N88 of gp120, and molecular dynamics showed that the N-terminal portion of the fusion peptide can be solvent-exposed. These results reveal the fusion peptide to be a neutralizing antibody epitope and thus a target for vaccine design.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kong, Rui -- Xu, Kai -- Zhou, Tongqing -- Acharya, Priyamvada -- Lemmin, Thomas -- Liu, Kevin -- Ozorowski, Gabriel -- Soto, Cinque -- Taft, Justin D -- Bailer, Robert T -- Cale, Evan M -- Chen, Lei -- Choi, Chang W -- Chuang, Gwo-Yu -- Doria-Rose, Nicole A -- Druz, Aliaksandr -- Georgiev, Ivelin S -- Gorman, Jason -- Huang, Jinghe -- Joyce, M Gordon -- Louder, Mark K -- Ma, Xiaochu -- McKee, Krisha -- O'Dell, Sijy -- Pancera, Marie -- Yang, Yongping -- Blanchard, Scott C -- Mothes, Walther -- Burton, Dennis R -- Koff, Wayne C -- Connors, Mark -- Ward, Andrew B -- Kwong, Peter D -- Mascola, John R -- P01GM56550/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM079238/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM116654/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 May 13;352(6287):828-33. doi: 10.1126/science.aae0474.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ; Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; HIV-Specific Immunity Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. ; Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA. ; Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Center, Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Boston, MA 02142, USA. ; International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, NY 10038, USA. ; Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. pdkwong@nih.gov jmascola@nih.gov.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27174988" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1572-879X
    Keywords: Olefin metathesis ; catalytic activity ; model catalysts ; molybdenum oxides ; surface analysis
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Abstract The activity of various molybdenum oxides supported on a molybdenum foil substrate for the catalysis of propylene metathesis is measured using an isolatable, high-pressure reactor incorporated in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber which allows samples to be transferred directly from vacuum into the catalytic test chamber. MoO x samples are prepared both by oxidation of metallic molybdenum and reduction of molybdenum trioxide. The results suggest that the presence of an oxygen overlayer on the catalyst inhibits reaction and that the ranking of activity for metathesis at 870 K using 450 Torr of propylene for oxide samples is MoO2〉MoO3〉Mo where MoO2 is ∼ 30 times more active than molybdenum metal under these conditions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Description / Table of Contents: Zusammenfassung Vorgelegt werden Kartendarstellungen der Feuchttemperatur für Mexiko. Die Bedingungne im Winter und Sommer werden durch Karten für Januar und Juli wiedergegeben. Die Linien der Feuchttemperatur folgen im Allgemeinen der vielgestaltigen Topographie des Landes mit den niedrigsten Werten über Gebirgsgegenden und dem Hochplateau. Es wird der Versuch gemacht, die Ausdehnung der heiss-feuchten Umwelt des Landes durch Anwendung eines einfachen biometeorologischen Index zu berechnen. Die räumliche Verteilung des Diskomfort Index für Mexiko wird für 14:00 hr für die Monate Januar, Mai und Juli gebracht. Sie zeigt die günstige Wirkung der Höhe auf die atmosphärische Umwelt in den nordwestlichen und zentralen Teilen des grossen mexikanischen Plateaus.
    Abstract: Resume On présente ici des cartes de la température du thermomètre mouillé valables pour le Méxique. On y a transcrit les conditions hivernales et estivales an moyen des cartes des mois de janvier et juillet. Les isolignes suivent en général les particularités du relief tourmenté du pays et les valeurs les plus faibles se rencontrent dans les régions de montagne et sur le Haut-Plateau. On essaie en outre de déterminer les régions du pays soumises à une ambiance chaude et humide en utilisant pour cela un indice biométéorologique simple.La répartition dans l'espace de l'indice d'inconfort valable à 14 heures à Mexique est rapporté pour les mois de janvier, mai et juillet. Cette représentation montre l'effet favorable de l'altitude sur l'ambiance générale dans le nord-ouest et le centre du Grand Plateau Méxicain.
    Notes: Abstract Wet-bulb temperature maps for Mexico are presented.Winter and summer conditions are depicted in the January and July maps.Wet-bulb temperature lines reveal in general the rugged topography of the country with lowest values over mountain areas and high plateau. An attempt is made to evaluate the extent of the hot-humid environments in the country making use of a simple biometeorological index. Areal distribution of discomfort index for Mexico is presented for January, May and July at 14:00 hr, showing the favorable effect of altitude on the atmospheric environment in the Northwest and Central portions of the Great Mexican Plateau.
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    ISSN: 0168-583X
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0169-4332
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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