Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Book
    Book
    New York : : Oxford University press,
    Call number: WA100:054 ; ordered
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: 256 p.
    ISBN: 9780198841326 , 9780198841333
    Language: English
    Location: Library.
    Location: F020
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Book
    Book
    [s.l. :] : Cancerregisteret, Kraeftens Bekaempelse,
    Call number: QZ203:035
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: 418 p.
    ISBN: 87-87135-30-2
    Language: English
    Location: Library.
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Book
    Book
    Chichester, West Sussex : : John Wiley & Sons,
    Call number: C060:187 ; C060:248 ; QH405:059
    Description / Table of Contents: "This book sets out to provide an example-based, 'how-to' guide to the comparison of measurement methods in a clinical context. Whilst much material has been published on obtaining and comparing accurate measurements in medical research this will be the first book length treatment of the subject. The author draws upon his experience in multicentre clinical studies to present data and examples drawn from real case studies. The book will be supplemented by a website hosting datasets and programs to allow the reader to reproduce all of the analyses"--Provided by publisher.
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: [xi], 157 p. : , ill.
    ISBN: 9780470694237 (cloth)
    Series Statement: Statistics in practice
    Language: English
    Note: (Publisher-supplied data) 1 Introduction 2 Method comparisons 2.1 One measurement by each method 2.1.1 Prediction of one method from another 2.1.2 Why not the correlation? 2.1.3 A new method and a reference method 2.2 Replicate measurements by each method 2.2.1 Exchangeable replicates: fat data 2.2.2 Linked replicates: Oximetry data 2.2.3 Why not use the averages of the replicates? 2.3 More than two methods 2.4 Terminology and notation 2.5 What it is all about 3 How to use this chapter 3.2 Two methods 3.2.1 Single measurements 3.2.2 Comparing with a gold standard 3.2.3 Replicate measurements 3.3 More than two methods 3.3.1 Single measurements 3.3.2 Replicate measurements 4 Two methods with a single measurement on each 4.1 Model for limits of agreement 4.1.1 Prediction between methods 4.1.2 The correlation of the difference and the average 4.2 Non-constant difference between methods 4.3 A worked example 4.4 What really goes on 4.4.1 Scaling 4.4.2 Independence 4.4.3 Actual behavior 4.5 Other regression methods for non-constant bias 4.5.1 Why ordinary regression fails 4.5.2 Deming regression 4.6 Comparison with a gold standard 4.7 Non-constant variance 4.7.1 Regression approach 4.7.2 A worked example 4.8 Transformations 4.8.1 Log-transform 4.9 Summary 5 Replicate measurements 5.1 Pairing of replicate measurements 5.1.1 Exchangeable replicates 5.1.2 Linked replicates 5.2 Plotting replicate measurements 5.3 Models for replicate measurements 5.3.1 Exchangeable replicates 5.3.2 Linked replicates 5.4 Interpretation of the random effects 5.5 Estimation 5.6 Getting it wrong and getting it almost right 5.6.1 Averaging over replicates 5.6.2 Replicates as items 5.7 Summary 6 Several methods of measurement 6.1 Model 6.2 Replicate measurements 6.3 Single measurement by each method , 7 A general model for method comparisons 7.1 Scaling 7.2 Interpretation of the random effects 7.3 Parametrization of the mean 7.4 Prediction limits 7.4.1 Mean of replicates 7.4.2 Plotting predictions between methods 7.4.3 Reporting variance components 7.4.4 Comparison with a gold standard 7.5 Estimation 7.5.1 Alternating regressions 7.5.2 Estimation using BUGS 7.5.3 A worked example 7.6 Models with non-constant variance 7.6.1 Linear dependence of residual standard error 7.7 Summary 8 Transformation of measurements 8.1 Log-transformation 8.2 Transformations of percentages 8.2.1 A worked example 8.2.2 Implementation in MethComp 8.3 Other transformations 8.3.1 Different transformations for different methods 8.4 Several methods 8.5 Variance components 8.6 Summary 9 Repeatability, reproducibility and coefficient of variation 9.1 Repeatability 9.2 Reproducibility 9.3 Coefficient of variation 9.3.1 Symmetric interval on the log-scale 9.3.2 Computing the CV correctly 9.3.3 Transformations 10 Measures of association and agreement 10.1 IBC individual bioequivalence criterion 10.2 Agreement index 10.3 Relative variance index 10.4 Total deviation index 10.5 Correlation measures 10.5.1 Correlation coefficient 10.5.2 Intraclass correlation coefficient 10.5.3 Concordance correlation coefficient 10.6 Summary 11 Design of method comparison studies 11.1 Sample size 11.1.1 Mean parameters 11.1.2 Variance parameters 11.2 Repeated measures designs 11.3 Summary 12 Examples using standard software 12.1 SAS 12.1.1 Exchangeable replicates 12.1.2 Linked replicates 12.2 Stata 12.2.1 Exchangeable replicates 12.2.2 Linked replicates 12.3 R 12.3.1 Exchangeable replicates 12.3.2 Linked replicates 13 The MethComp package for R 13.1 Data structures 13.2 Function overview 13.2.1 Graphical functions 13.2.2 Data manipulating functions 13.2.3 Analysis functions 13.2.4 Reporting functions.
    Location: C060
    Location: C060
    Location: Library.
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1573-7217
    Keywords: breast cancer ; histological grade ; lymph-node staging ; prognostic factors ; multivariate prognostic index ; survival ; tumour size
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary In primary, operable breast cancer, the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) based on tumour size, lymphnode stage and histological grade can identify three prognostic groups (PGs) with 10-year survival rates of 83%, 52%, and 13%. With the aim of defining a subset of patients having so good prognosis that adjuvant therapy can be withhold, the NPI was applied to a Danish population-based study group comprising 9,149 patients. As opposed to the British study, we used conventional axillary lymph-node staging. Histological grading was in both studies done by means of a similar slight modification of the Bloom and Richardson procedure, but in the Danish study only ductal carcinomas were graded. The 10-year crude survival was 68.1% for 4,791 patients with tumour size ≤ 2 cm and 70.0% for 2,900 patients with grade I tumours. For 4,761 node-negative patients, the 10-year survival was also 70.0%, the expected survival being 89.3%. The relative mortality (observed:expected) was even at 10 years 2.1 demonstrating that more than 10 years observation time is necessary to estimate cumulated mortality. By application of the NPI, the Danish good PG comprising 27.3% of the patients had a 10-year survival of 79.0%. Thus, the index defined a subset with better survival than could be defined individually by each of its three components, but it did not succeed in defining a subset with survival similar to the expected; additional prognostic factors are therefore needed. The somewhat poorer survival of the Danish good PG may be ascribed to the British inclusion of non-ductal carcinomas, to interobserver variation present only in the Danish study, and to poorer expected survival of the Danish patients. The 10-year survival of the Danish moderate PG and poor PG was 56% and 25%, respectively. These improved survival rates are attributed to the administration of adjuvant therapies. There were virtually no node-positive patients in the good PG and no node-negative patients in the poor PG. Patients should therefore still be stratified initially by lymph-node status, but tumour size and histological grade are significant prognostic factors primarily within the node-negative group, and they should be included in future prognostication procedures.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...