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  • 1
    Keywords: Medicine ; Neurosciences ; Ophthalmology ; Neurobiology ; Biomedicine ; Neurosciences ; Ophthalmology ; Neurobiology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: 1. Introduction -- 2. Fundamental Retinal Circuitry for Circadian Rhythms -- 3. Circadian photoreception: from phototransduction to behaviour -- 4. Role of Melatonin and Dopamine in the Regulation of Retinal Circadian Rhythms -- 5. Circadian Organization of the Vertebrate Retina -- 6. Rhythmicity of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium -- 7. Retinal Circadian Rhythms in Mammals Revealed Using Electroretinography -- 8. Circadian Clock and Light Induced Retinal Damage -- 9. Circadian Rhythms and Vision in Zebrafish -- 10. Circadian Modulation of the Limulus Eye for Day and Night Vision -- 11. Molluscan Ocular Pacemakers: Lessons Learned. ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗
    Abstract: The retina plays a critical role in the organization of the circadian system by synchronizing the braiń€™s central clock with the external day through transduction of the daily light/dark cycle.℗ However, the substantial variation in luminance imposed on the retina between day and night also poses a challenge to its role as a sensory tissue ́€“ how is it possible to faithfully encode the enormous dynamic range of luminance that can exceed 10 orders of magnitude? The Retina and Circadian Rhythms summarizes the knowledge accumulated over the last 30 years about the organization of the retinal circadian clock in many different species, concentrating on the roles that this circadian system plays in retinal function. About the Series: The Springer Series in Vision Research is a comprehensive update and overview of cutting edge vision research, exploring, in depth, current breakthroughs at a conceptual level. It details the whole visual system, from molecular processes to anatomy, physiology and behavior and covers both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from terrestrial and aquatic habitats. Each book in the Series is aimed at all individuals with interests in vision including advanced graduate students, post-doctoral researchers, established vision scientists and clinical investigators.The series editors are N. Justin Marshall, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Australia and Shaun P. Collin, Neuroecology Group within the School of Animal Biology and the Oceans Institute at the University of Western Australia
    Pages: VIII, 238 p. 50 illus., 33 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9781461496137
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  • 2
    Keywords: Medicine ; Neurosciences ; Ophthalmology ; Cytology ; Biomedicine ; Neurosciences ; Ophthalmology ; Cell Biology ; Springer eBooks
    Abstract: Photopigments are molecules that react to light and mediate a number of processes and behaviours in animals. Visual pigments housed within the photoreceptors of the eye, such as the rods and cones in vertebrates are the best known, however, visual pigments are increasingly being found in other tissues, including other retinal cells, the skin and the brain. Other closely related molecules from the G protein family, such as melanopsin mediate light driven processes including circadian rhythmicity and pupil constriction. This Volume examines the enormous diversity of visual pigments and traces the evolution of these G protein coupled receptors in both invertebrates and vertebrates in the context of the visual and non-visual demands dictated by a species’ ecological niche
    Pages: VIII, 276 p. 62 illus., 46 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9781461443551
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-234X
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary A previously undescribed receptor in the coxo-trochantinal region of the metathoracic leg of the cockroach Periplaneta americana was found to have central cell bodies. This cockroach stretch receptor is the second sensory receptor in insects reported to possess somata in the CNS and its remarkable similarity to a locust proprioceptor suggests it to be homologous.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-0878
    Keywords: Visual system ; Retinal projections ; Optic tectum ; Pretectum ; Cobalt filling ; Teleost ; Lethrinus chrysostomus (Teleostei)
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Summary Cobaltous-lysine is transported anterogradely from the optic nerve of the teleost, Lethrinus chrysostomus (Lethrinidae, Perciformes). The marginal optic tract is labelled in longtitudinal bands of light and dark staining fibres which persists caudally within the ventral division but not in the dorsal division. This species possesses multiple central targets in the contralateral preoptic, diencephalic, pretectal, periventricular and tectal regions of the brain. In addition, a greater subdivision of the marginal optic tract is found to project to various nuclei. Ipsilateral projections are found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and in the region of the horizontal commissure. Projections are also found in the telencephalic region of the nucleus olfactoretinalis and the thalamic region of the nucleus thalamoretinalis. The retinotopicity of some of these nuclei, found in previous studies, is discussed in relation to the possibility of specific sub-populations of retinal ganglion cells having different central targets.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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