Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: Life sciences ; Cytology ; Developmental Biology ; Animal ecology ; Biodiversity ; Evolution (Biology) ; Animal Physiology ; Life sciences ; Animal Physiology ; Oxidative Stress ; Animal ecology ; Biodiversity ; Evolutionary Biology ; Developmental Biology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Historical and Contemporary Issues of Oxidative Stress, Hormesis and Life History Evolution -- Early Life Hormesis and Oxidative Experiences Fine-Tune the Adult Phenotype -- Variation in Oxidative Stress Threats and Hormesis Across Environments -- Nutritional Ecology, Foraging Strategies and Food Selection -- Coping with Physical Activity and Inactivity -- The Costs of Makeup in Sexual Selection and Social Signalling -- The Role of Oxidative Stress and Hormesis in Shaping Reproductive Strategies from Mating Systems to Parental Care -- Combating Parasites: Immune Response and Inflammation -- Variation Within and Among Species in Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Hormetic Responses -- Integrating Oxidative Stress and Hormesis into Research on Senescence and Survival Perspectives
    Abstract: This book discusses oxidative stress and hormesis from the perspective of an evolutionary ecologist or physiologist. In the first of ten chapters, general historical information, definitions, and background of research on oxidative stress physiology, hormesis, and life history are provided. Chapters 2-10 highlight the different solutions that organisms have evolved to cope with the oxidative threats posed by their environments and lifestyles. The author illustrates how oxidative stress and hormesis have shaped diversity in organism life-histories, behavioral profiles, morphological phenotypes, and aging mechanisms. The book offers fascinating insights into how organisms work and how they evolve to sustain their physiological functions under a vast array of environmental conditions
    Pages: XVII, 348 p. 50 illus., 14 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9783642546631
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. : Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
    Call number: 04-GEN:89 ; ATV-BIO:113
    Keywords: Genetic Engineering ; Mice / embryology
    Notes: Includes index.
    Pages: ix, 332 p. : ill. (some col.)
    ISBN: 0-87969-175-1
    Signatur Availability
    04-GEN:89 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
    ATV-BIO:113 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: Medicine ; Orthopedics ; Orthopedic surgery ; Medicine & Public Health ; Orthopedics ; Surgical Orthopedics ; Springer eBooks
    Pages: : digital
    ISBN: 9788847020351
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: EPIDEMIOLOGY ; ATOPY ; MEDICAL HISTORY ; IMMUNE
    Abstract: We performed a pooled analysis of data on self-reported history of infections in relation to the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) from 17 case-control studies that included 12,585 cases and 15,416 controls aged 16-96 years at recruitment. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated in two-stage random-effect or joint fixed-effect models, adjusting for age, sex and study centre. Data from the 2 years before diagnosis (or date of interview for controls) were excluded. A self-reported history of infectious mononucleosis was associated with an excess risk of NHL (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.01-1.57 based on data from 16 studies); study-specific results indicate significant (I(2) = 51%, p = 0.01) heterogeneity. A self-reported history of measles or whooping cough was associated with an approximate 15% reduction in risk. History of other infection was not associated with NHL. We find little clear evidence of an association between NHL risk and infection although the limitations of data based on self-reported medical history (particularly of childhood illness reported by older people) are well recognized.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22266776
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: DISEASE ; RISK ; LYMPHOMA ; HEALTH ; PESTICIDE EXPOSURE ; SOLVENTS ; MULTICENTER CASE-CONTROL ; MONOCLONAL GAMMOPATHY ; UNDETERMINED SIGNIFICANCE ; Benzene
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: We investigated occupational risk of multiple myeloma (MM) in a pooled analysis of five international case-control studies. METHODS: We calculated the odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval for selected occupations with unconditional regression analysis in 1959 MM cases and 6192 controls, by pooling study-specific risks using random-effects meta-analysis. Exposure to organic solvents was assessed with a job-exposure matrix (JEM). RESULTS: Gardeners and nursery workers combined, most likely exposed to pesticides, showed a 50% increase in risk (OR = 1.50, 95% CI 0.9-2.3), while other farming jobs did not. Metal processors (OR = 1.55, 95% CI 0.9-2.3), female cleaners (OR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.0-1.8), and high level exposure to organic solvents (OR = 1.38, 95% CI 0.96-1.8) also showed moderately increased risks. CONCLUSIONS: Additional case-control studies of MM aetiology are warranted to further investigate the nature of the repeatedly reported increase in MM risk in several occupational groups.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23403129
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: TOBACCO SMOKING ; METAANALYSIS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Past investigations of cigarette smoking and multiple myeloma have been underpowered to detect moderate associations, particularly within subgroups. To clarify this association, we conducted a pooled analysis of nine case-control studies in the International Multiple Myeloma Consortium, with individual-level questionnaire data on cigarette smoking history and other covariates. METHODS: Using a pooled population of 2,670 cases and 11,913 controls, we computed odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) relating smoking to multiple myeloma risk using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for gender, age group, race, education, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and study center. RESULTS: Neither ever smokers (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.87-1.05), current smokers (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.73-0.93), nor former smokers (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.92-1.14) had increased risks of multiple myeloma compared with never smokers. Analyses of smoking frequency, pack-years, and duration did not reveal significant or consistent patterns, and there was no significant effect modification by subgroups. CONCLUSION: Findings from this large pooled analysis do not support the hypothesis of cigarette smoking as a causal factor for multiple myeloma. IMPACT: Cigarette smoking is one of the most important risk factors for cancer, but the association with multiple myeloma was inconclusive. This study had excellent power to detect modest associations, and had individual-level data to evaluate confounding and effect modification by potentially important factors that were not evaluated in previous studies. Our findings confirm that smoking is not a risk factor for multiple myeloma. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(3); 631-4. (c)2014 AACR.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25538226
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: PROGRAM ; PUBLIC-HEALTH ; POLICY ; ADHERENCE ; PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING SCIENCE ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC ENTERPRISE ; CANCER-EPIDEMIOLOGY ; PLEA ; FALSE ; RECIPE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. OBJECTIVES: The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. DISCUSSION: We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. CONCLUSIONS: The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public's health.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25712798
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Various occupations have been associated with an elevated risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but results have been inconsistent across studies. OBJECTIVES: We investigated occupational risk of NHL and of four common NHL subtypes with particular focus on occupations of a priori interest. METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of 10,046 cases and 12,025 controls from 10 NHL studies participating in the InterLymph Consortium. We harmonized the occupational coding using the 1968 International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO-1968) and grouped occupations previously associated with NHL into 25 a priori groups. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for center, age, and sex were determined for NHL overall and for the following four subtypes: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). RESULTS: We confirmed previously reported positive associations between NHL and farming occupations [field crop/vegetable farm workers OR = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.51; general farm workers OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.37]; we also confirmed associations of NHL with specific occupations such as women's hairdressers (OR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.74), charworkers/cleaners (OR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.36), spray-painters (OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.30, 3.29), electrical wiremen (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.54), and carpenters (OR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.93). We observed subtype-specific associations for DLBCL and CLL/SLL in women's hairdressers and for DLBCL and PTCL in textile workers. CONCLUSIONS: Our pooled analysis of 10 international studies adds to evidence suggesting that farming, hairdressing, and textile industry-related exposures may contribute to NHL risk. Associations with women's hairdresser and textile occupations may be specific for certain NHL subtypes. CITATION: 't Mannetje A, De Roos AJ, Boffetta P, Vermeulen R, Benke G, Fritschi L, Brennan P, Foretova L, Maynadie M, Becker N, Nieters A, Staines A, Campagna M, Chiu B, Clavel J, de Sanjose S, Hartge P, Holly EA, Bracci P, Linet MS, Monnereau A, Orsi L, Purdue MP, Rothman N, Lan Q, Kane E, Seniori Costantini A, Miligi L, Spinelli JJ, Zheng T, Cocco P, Kricker A. 2016. Occupation and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its subtypes: a pooled analysis from the InterLymph Consortium. Environ Health Perspect 124:396-405; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409294.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26340796
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; neoplasms ; POLYMORPHISMS ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; SAN-FRANCISCO ; AGGREGATION ; FRANCISCO BAY AREA ; CONNECTICUT WOMEN ; MIGRANTS
    Abstract: A role for genetic susceptibility in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is supported by the accumulating evidence of common genetic variations altering NHL risk. However, the pattern of NHL heritability remains poorly understood. We conducted a pooled analysis of 10 211 NHL cases and 11905 controls from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) to evaluate NHL risk among those with hematopoietic malignancies in first-degree relatives. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of NHL and its subtypes were estimated from unconditional logistic regression models with adjustment for confounders. NHL risk was elevated for individuals who reported first-degree relatives with NHL (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.2-1.9), Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.6; 95% Cl = 1.1-2.3), and leukemia (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.2-2.7). Risk was highest among individuals who reported a brother with NHL (OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.6-4.8) and was consistent for all NHL subtypes evaluated. If a first-degree relative had Hodgkin lymphoma, NHL risk was highest if the relative was a parent (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.9). If a first-degree relative had leukemia, NHL risk was highest among women who reported a sister with leukemia (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.6-5.6). The pattern of NHL heritability appeared to be uniform across NHL subtypes, but risk patterns differed by specific hematopoietic malignancies and the sex of the relative, revealing critical clues to disease etiology.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17185468
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; DIAGNOSIS ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; HISTORY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; REDUCTION ; SKIN ; ASSOCIATION ; PROGRESSION ; LYMPHOMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; case-control studies ; INDIVIDUALS ; asthma ; ATOPY ; case control study ; case-control study ; MEDICAL HISTORY ; SAN-FRANCISCO ; allergy ; hay fever ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; LEVEL ; pooled analysis ; BIRTH-ORDER ; USA ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; cancer research ; NON-HODGKIN-LYMPHOMA ; FRANCISCO BAY AREA ; HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES ; ECZEMA ; CONFIDENCE-INTERVALS ; INTERLYMPH ; ALLERGIES ; CONFIDENCE
    Abstract: We performed a pooled analysis of data on atopic disease and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) from 13 case-control studies, including 13,535 NHL cases and 16,388 controls. Self-reported atopic diseases diagnosed 2 years or more before NHL diagnosis (cases) or interview (controls) were analyzed. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were computed in two-stage random-effects or joint fixed-effects models, and adjusted for age, sex, and study center. When modeled individually, lifetime history of asthma, flay fever, specific allergy (excluding hay fever, asthma, and eczema), and food allergy were associated with a significant reduction in NHL, risk, and there was no association for eczema. When each atopic condition was included in the same model, reduced NHL risk was only associated with a history of allergy (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.68-0.94) and reduced R-cell NHL risk was associated with history of hay fever (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.77-0.95) and allergy (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76-0.93). Significant reductions in B-cell NHL risk were also observed individuals who were likely to be truly or highly atopic-those with hay fever, allergy, or asthma and at least one other atopic condition over their lifetime. The inverse associations were consistent for the diffuse large B-cell and follicular subtypes. Eczema was positively associated with lymphomas of the skin; misdiagnosis of lymphoma as eczema is likely, but progression of eczema to cutaneous lymphoma cannot be excluded. This Pooled study shows evidence of a modest but consistent reduction in the risk of B-cell NHL associated with atopy. [Cancer Res 2009;69(16):6482-9]
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19654312
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...