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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; MARKER ; IMPACT ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; STAGE ; IDENTIFICATION ; HEALTH ; SNP ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; diabetes ; REPLICATION ; FUTURE ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; ONCOLOGY ; VARIANT ; METAANALYSIS ; biomarker ; methods ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; genetic association ; SCAN ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Type ; single nucleotide ; RISK-ASSOCIATED LOCI
    Abstract: Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (PrCa). In the two-stage Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility prostate cancer scan, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10486567, located within intron 2 of JAZF1 gene on chromosome 7p15.2, showed a promising association with PrCa overall (P = 2.14 x 10(-6)), with a suggestion of stronger association with aggressive disease (P = 1.2 x 10(-7)). Methods: In the third stage of genome-wide association studies, we genotyped 106 JAZF1 SNPs in 10,286 PrCa cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry. Results: The strongest association was observed with the initial marker rs10486567, which now achieves genome-wide significance [P = 7.79 x 10(-11); ORHET, 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.27); ORHOM, 1.37 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.56)]. We did not confirm a previous suggestion of a stronger association of rs10486567 with aggressive disease (P = 1.60 x 10(-4) for aggressive cancer, n = 4,597; P = 3.25 x 10(-8) for non-aggressive cancer, n = 4,514). Based on a multilocus model with adjustment for rs10486567, no additional independent signals were observed at chromosome 7p15.2. There was no association between PrCa risk and SNPs in JAZF1 previously associated with height (rs849140; P = 0.587), body stature (rs849141, tagged by rs849136; P = 0.171), and risk of type 2 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus (rs864745, tagged by rs849142; P = 0.657). Conclusion: rs10486567 remains the most significant marker for PrCa risk within JAZF1 in individuals of European ancestry. Impact: Future studies should identify all variants in high linkage disequilibrium with rs10486567 and evaluate their functional significance for PrCa. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(5); 1349-55. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20406958
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  • 2
    Keywords: DOWN-REGULATION ; CELL-CARCINOMA ; PULMONARY-FIBROSIS ; COMMON VARIANTS ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS ; CHROMOSOME 8Q24 ; CONFERS SUSCEPTIBILITY ; UDP-GLUCURONOSYLTRANSFERASES ; TELOMERASE MUTATIONS ; SEQUENCE VARIANT
    Abstract: We conducted a multi-stage, genome-wide association study of bladder cancer with a primary scan of 591,637 SNPs in 3,532 affected individuals (cases) and 5,120 controls of European descent from five studies followed by a replication strategy, which included 8,382 cases and 48,275 controls from 16 studies. In a combined analysis, we identified three new regions associated with bladder cancer on chromosomes 22q13.1, 19q12 and 2q37.1: rs1014971, (P = 8 x 10(-12)) maps to a non-genic region of chromosome 22q13.1, rs8102137 (P = 2 x 10(-11)) on 19q12 maps to CCNE1 and rs11892031 (P = 1 x 10(-7)) maps to the UGT1A cluster on 2q37.1. We confirmed four previously identified genome-wide associations on chromosomes 3q28, 4p16.3, 8q24.21 and 8q24.3, validated previous candidate associations for the GSTM1 deletion (P = 4 x 10(-11)) and a tag SNP for NAT2 acetylation status (P = 4 x 10(-11)), and found interactions with smoking in both regions. Our findings on common variants associated with bladder cancer risk should provide new insights into the mechanisms of carcinogenesis.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20972438
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  • 3
    Keywords: MODELS ; POPULATION ; SIGNAL ; BREAST-CANCER ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; COMMON VARIANT ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS ; IDENTIFIES 5 ; MYEOV
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies have identified prostate cancer susceptibility alleles on chromosome 11q13. As part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative, the region flanking the most significant marker, rs10896449, was fine mapped in 10 272 cases and 9123 controls of European origin (10 studies) using 120 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected by a two-staged tagging strategy using HapMap SNPs. Single-locus analysis identified 18 SNPs below genome-wide significance (P 〈 10(-8)) with rs10896449 the most significant (P = 7.94 x 10(-19)). Multi-locus models that included significant SNPs sequentially identified a second association at rs12793759 [odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 4.76 x 10(-5), adjusted P = 0.004] that is independent of rs10896449 and remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing within the region. rs10896438, a proxy of previously reported rs12418451 (r(2) = 0.96), independent of both rs10896449 and rs12793759 was detected (OR = 1.07, P = 5.92 x 10(-3), adjusted P = 0.054). Our observation of a recombination hotspot that separates rs10896438 from rs10896449 and rs12793759, and low linkage disequilibrium (rs10896449-rs12793759, r(2) = 0.17; rs10896449-rs10896438, r(2) = 0.10; rs12793759-rs10896438, r(2) = 0.12) corroborate our finding of three independent signals. By analysis of tagged SNPs across similar to 123 kb using next generation sequencing of 63 controls of European origin, 1000 Genome and HapMap data, we observed multiple surrogates for the three independent signals marked by rs10896449 (n = 31), rs10896438 (n = 24) and rs12793759 (n = 8). Our results indicate that a complex architecture underlying the common variants contributing to prostate cancer risk at 11q13. We estimate that at least 63 common variants should be considered in future studies designed to investigate the biological basis of the multiple association signals
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21531787
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  • 4
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; RISK ; COMPLEXES ; AMPLIFICATION ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; MUTATIONS ; VARIANT ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; CONFERS SUSCEPTIBILITY
    Abstract: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell-cycle protein. We performed genetic fine-mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r(2) 〉/= 0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group, we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWASs, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele OR = 1.18 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.27, P = 4.67 x 10(-5)] versus OR = 1.01 (95% CI, 0.93-1.10, P = 0.79) for nonaggressive disease, with P = 0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (P = 0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (Ptrend = 0.024). Overexpression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E overexpression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. Cancer Res; 74(20); 5808-18. (c)2014 AACR.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25320178
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  • 5
    Abstract: Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 15 independent genomic regions associated with bladder cancer risk. In search for additional susceptibility variants, we followed up on four promising single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that had not achieved genome-wide significance in 6911 cases and 11 814 controls (rs6104690, rs4510656, rs5003154 and rs4907479, P 〈 1 x 10(-6)), using additional data from existing GWAS datasets and targeted genotyping for studies that did not have GWAS data. In a combined analysis, which included data on up to 15 058 cases and 286 270 controls, two SNPs achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 in a gene desert at 20p12.2 (P = 2.19 x 10(-11)) and rs4907479 within the MCF2L gene at 13q34 (P = 3.3 x 10(-10)). Imputation and fine-mapping analyses were performed in these two regions for a subset of 5551 bladder cancer cases and 10 242 controls. Analyses at the 13q34 region suggest a single signal marked by rs4907479. In contrast, we detected two signals in the 20p12.2 region-the first signal is marked by rs6104690, and the second signal is marked by two moderately correlated SNPs (r(2) = 0.53), rs6108803 and the previously reported rs62185668. The second 20p12.2 signal is more strongly associated with the risk of muscle-invasive (T2-T4 stage) compared with non-muscle-invasive (Ta, T1 stage) bladder cancer (case-case P 〈/= 0.02 for both rs62185668 and rs6108803). Functional analyses are needed to explore the biological mechanisms underlying these novel genetic associations with risk for bladder cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26732427
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; RISK ; MARKER ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; IDENTIFICATION ; genetics ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; cancer risk ; VARIANT ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; CORE ; LOCUS ; USA ; CANCER-RISK ; 8Q24 ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; SCAN ; Genetic ; Genome-wide association studies ; RANGE ; MULTIPLE LOCI
    Abstract: We report a genome-wide association study in 10,286 cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. We identify a new association with prostate cancer risk on chromosome 8q24 (rs620861, P = 1.3 x 10(-10), heterozygote OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.10-1.24; homozygote OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.45). This defines a new locus associated with prostate cancer susceptibility on 8q24
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19767755
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; IDENTIFICATION ; METAANALYSIS ; LOCUS ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MULTIPLE LOCI ; HEPATOCYTE NUCLEAR FACTOR-1-BETA
    Abstract: Previous genome-wide association studies have identified two independent variants in HNF1B as susceptibility loci for prostate cancer risk. To fine-map common genetic variation in this region, we genotyped 79 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 17q12 region harboring HNF1B in 10 272 prostate cancer cases and 9123 controls of European ancestry from 10 case-control studies as part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. Ten SNPs were significantly related to prostate cancer risk at a genome-wide significance level of P 〈 5 x 10(-8) with the most significant association with rs4430796 (P = 1.62 x 10(-24)). However, risk within this first locus was not entirely explained by rs4430796. Although modestly correlated (r(2) = 0.64), rs7405696 was also associated with risk (P = 9.35 x 10(-23)) even after adjustment for rs4430769 (P = 0.007). As expected, rs11649743 was related to prostate cancer risk (P = 3.54 x 10(-8)); however, the association within this second locus was stronger for rs4794758 (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)), which explained all of the risk observed with rs11649743 when both SNPs were included in the same model (P = 0.32 for rs11649743; P = 0.002 for rs4794758). Sequential conditional analyses indicated that five SNPs (rs4430796, rs7405696, rs4794758, rs1016990 and rs3094509) together comprise the best model for risk in this region. This study demonstrates a complex relationship between variants in the HNF1B region and prostate cancer risk. Further studies are needed to investigate the biological basis of the association of variants in 17q12 with prostate cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21576123
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  • 8
    Keywords: GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; DNA-REPAIR ; PHENOTYPE ; CONFERS SUSCEPTIBILITY ; INDEPENDENCE ; NAT2 SLOW ACETYLATION ; GSTM1 NULL ; NADH CYTOCHROME B(5)
    Abstract: Bladder cancer is a complex disease with known environmental and genetic risk factors. We performed a genome-wide interaction study (GWAS) of smoking and bladder cancer risk based on primary scan data from 3002 cases and 4411 controls from the National Cancer Institute Bladder Cancer GWAS. Alternative methods were used to evaluate both additive and multiplicative interactions between individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and smoking exposure. SNPs with interaction P values 〈 5 x 10(-) (5) were evaluated further in an independent dataset of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls. We identified 10 SNPs that showed association in a consistent manner with the initial dataset and in the combined dataset, providing evidence of interaction with tobacco use. Further, two of these novel SNPs showed strong evidence of association with bladder cancer in tobacco use subgroups that approached genome-wide significance. Specifically, rs1711973 (FOXF2) on 6p25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for never smokers [combined odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.20-1.50, P value = 5.18 x 10(-) (7)]; and rs12216499 (RSPH3-TAGAP-EZR) on 6q25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for ever smokers (combined OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.67-0.84, P value = 6.35 x 10(-) (7)). In our analysis of smoking and bladder cancer, the tests for multiplicative interaction seemed to more commonly identify susceptibility loci with associations in never smokers, whereas the additive interaction analysis identified more loci with associations among smokers-including the known smoking and NAT2 acetylation interaction. Our findings provide additional evidence of gene-environment interactions for tobacco and bladder cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24662972
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  • 9
    Keywords: COHORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; METAANALYSIS ; GTPASE-ACTIVATING PROTEIN ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; SEQUENCE VARIANTS ; GLEASON SCORE ; LINKAGE SCAN
    Abstract: Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence, discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from nonaggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49 x 10(-9)) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18 x 10(-8)). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85 x 10(-5)) with no association for nonaggressive prostate cancer compared with controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25939597
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  • 10
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been evaluated as a potential biomarker for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk in several studies, with conflicting findings. OBJECTIVE: We performed an analysis of genetic variants associated with leukocyte telomere length to assess the relationship between telomere length and RCC risk using Mendelian randomization, an approach unaffected by biases from temporal variability and reverse causation that might have affected earlier investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Genotypes from nine telomere length-associated variants for 10 784 cases and 20 406 cancer-free controls from six genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of RCC were aggregated into a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) predictive of leukocyte telomere length. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Odds ratios (ORs) relating the GRS and RCC risk were computed in individual GWAS datasets and combined by meta-analysis. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Longer genetically inferred telomere length was associated with an increased risk of RCC (OR=2.07 per predicted kilobase increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]:=1.70-2.53, p〈0.0001). As a sensitivity analysis, we excluded two telomere length variants in linkage disequilibrium (R2〉0.5) with GWAS-identified RCC risk variants (rs10936599 and rs9420907) from the telomere length GRS; despite this exclusion, a statistically significant association between the GRS and RCC risk persisted (OR=1.73, 95% CI=1.36-2.21, p〈0.0001). Exploratory analyses for individual histologic subtypes suggested comparable associations with the telomere length GRS for clear cell (N=5573, OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.50-2.49, p〈0.0001), papillary (N=573, OR=1.96, 95% CI=1.01-3.81, p=0.046), and chromophobe RCC (N=203, OR=2.37, 95% CI=0.78-7.17, p=0.13). CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation adds to the growing body of evidence indicating some aspect of longer telomere length is important for RCC risk. PATIENT SUMMARY: Telomeres are segments of DNA at chromosome ends that maintain chromosomal stability. Our study investigated the relationship between genetic variants associated with telomere length and renal cell carcinoma risk. We found evidence suggesting individuals with inherited predisposition to longer telomere length are at increased risk of developing renal cell carcinoma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28797570
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