Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-1041
    Keywords: Muzolimine ; pharmacodynamics ; pharmacokinetics ; furosemide ; saluresis
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: Summary In a biometrically planned, double-blind study on 12 Oedema-free male patients the saluretic effect of muzolimine 30 mg was compared with furosemide 40 mg. The plasma level of muzolimine was determined and correlated with its pharmacodynamics. In terms of excretion during the 12-hour observation period muzolimine 30 mg had as great a cumulative effect as furosemide 40 mg. There was a significant difference in the time-response curve. During the first two hours furosemide 40 mg had more saluretic effect than muzolimine 30 mg. Between two and four hours there was no significant difference between the two substances. Between four and six hours, however, muzolimine was somewhat more effective than furosemide, although the difference did not reach the level of significance. After 6 h there was no longer any difference between the two compounds. The half-life of the fall in concentration of muzolimine in plasma was 3.7 up to 10 h after its administration. The time-response curve of the increased urine excretion correlated well with the time course of the concentration of muzolimine in plasma.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-1041
    Keywords: muzolimine ; furosemide ; renal failure ; pharmacodynamics ; haemodialysis ; diuretics
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: Summary The pharmacodynamic effects of muzolimine and furosemide were compared in a single dose cross-over study in 8 patients on regular dialysis treatment, who had a residual diuresis of more than 300 ml/day. The study periods comprised two dialysis-free intervals of 3 days. On the second dialysis-free day either muzolimine 240 mg or furosemide 240 mg was administered orally. Urine was collected in 12-h periods on the pre-treatment, treatment and post-treatment days, and the excretion of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine were measured. After administration of muzolimine 240 mg urine volume rose to twice that of the previous day, and sodium excretion increased approximately threefold. In contrast, the effect of furosemide 240 mg was not as pronounced; the diuresis was only 1.6 times that on the previous day and natriuresis was only 2.2 times as large. Excretion of potassium and creatinine was only slightly increased by either substance. The elimination of urea was increased by both substances to the same degree as the corresponding increase in diuresis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-1041
    Keywords: Muzolimine ; furosemide ; chronic renal failure ; saluresis ; diuresis
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: Summary In a double blind cross-over study of 11 patients suffering from advanced chronic renal failure, the diuretic effect of single oral dose of muzolimine 240 mg and furosemide 240 mg was compared. The patients were stratified according to a serum creatinine of approximately 4/8 and 12 mg/dl, or a mean endogenous creatinine clearance of 21.7 ml/min/1.73 m2, 8.2 ml/min/1.73 m2 and 5.4 ml/min/1.73 m2. Urine volume and sodium excretion were studied biometrically using a 3-factor variance analysis. Urine excretion in all groups tended to be greater after muzolimine than after furosemide. The cumulative sodium excretion after muzolimine was significantly greater. In the groups with a creatinine clearance of 8.2 or 5.4 ml/min/1.73 m2, the duration of the time- response curve of muzolimine was greater than that of furosemide. Thus, even in advanced renal insufficiency, both substances had a saluretic effect. Muzolimine appeared to be significantly more effective than furosemide in causing natriuresis in patients with a serum creatinine of 4 to 8 mg/dl.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-0738
    Keywords: Mutagenicity testing ; Standard protocol ; Dominant lethal assay ; Male mice ; Collaborative study
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract The members of the work group “Dominant Lethal Mutations of the ad hoc Committee Chemogenetics” jointly carried out experimental studies in the period from November 1972 until February 1976. On the basis of the results obtained and the experience gained, they worked out on February 27, 1976, a standard protocol for the dominant lethal test (DLT) on male mice. The recommendations are: 1. The mating period should preferentially be as short as possible to obtain information about germ cell-stage specific actions of chemical mutagens. Its selection should be based on the objectives of individual investigators. For screening purposes, and with respect to a high fertilization rate, a 4-day mating period is recommended. 2. The total test period should cover at least 12 mating periods, i.e. the whole spermatogenic cycle. A limitation of the DLT to certain “critical” mating periods of high sensitivity is only permissible in repeat tests, or if the parts of gametogenesis concerned, e.g. spermatogoniogenesis or spermatocytogenesis, are studied by cytogenetical tests. 3. The mode of mating should preferentially be 1∶1. 4. The number of test animals to be used depends on various biological and statistical factors; no generally valid statement can be made concerning the number of test animals. By rule of thumb in the order of 50 fertilized females per group per mating interval is recommended. 5. The individual dosing of the substance in terms of mg/kg body weight is to be preferred. Otherwise, the weights of the animals should not deviate more than 5% from the mean value. 6. Results obtained from ill animals or those that died in the course of the trial should not be included in the evaluation. 7. The sensitivity of the mouse strain used against a standard dose of a known mutagen should be regularly checked; this evidence should be presented in publications. 8. For the following test conditions each investigator should make an optimal choice: animal strain, animal age and housing conditions. The investigator has also to decide whether a preliminary mating, in order to check the fertility of the animals to be used, and vaginal-plug evidence are useful in a given case. 9. The autopsy of the dams is best carried out a fortnight from the middle of the mating interval. 10. The results should be documented as completely as possible in the investigational report. The following data were also considered as essential, serving a direct comparison of the test groups: number of mated females (absolute), number of females with implantation (absolute and in %), number of implantations and of live and dead implants (absolute and per female). If the corpora lutea graviditates were counted, their number as well as the pre-implantation loss (absolute and per female) are to be stated. These data are also desirable for publications. 11. For the biological evaluation the following formula can be used for the calculation of dominant lethal factors: FL% = [1-live implants per female of the test group/live implants per female of the control group]×100 12. Statistical evaluation is an essential part of the DLT and various methods are known. For the statistical evaluation it is decisive which biological model and which statistical criteria are most important for the investigator. The DLT must be carried out according to the requirement of the model chosen.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...