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  • 1
    ISSN: 0375-9474
    Keywords: Nuclear Reactions
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-03-11
    Description: Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a leading cause of death due to disease in young people, but the biological determinants of treatment failure remain poorly understood. Recent genome-wide profiling of structural DNA alterations in ALL have identified multiple submicroscopic somatic mutations targeting key cellular pathways, and have demonstrated substantial evolution in genetic alterations from diagnosis to relapse. However, DNA sequence mutations in ALL have not been analysed in detail. To identify novel mutations in relapsed ALL, we resequenced 300 genes in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from 23 patients with ALL. This identified 52 somatic non-synonymous mutations in 32 genes, many of which were novel, including the transcriptional coactivators CREBBP and NCOR1, the transcription factors ERG, SPI1, TCF4 and TCF7L2, components of the Ras signalling pathway, histone genes, genes involved in histone modification (CREBBP and CTCF), and genes previously shown to be targets of recurring DNA copy number alteration in ALL. Analysis of an extended cohort of 71 diagnosis-relapse cases and 270 acute leukaemia cases that did not relapse found that 18.3% of relapse cases had sequence or deletion mutations of CREBBP, which encodes the transcriptional coactivator and histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CREBBP, also known as CBP). The mutations were either present at diagnosis or acquired at relapse, and resulted in truncated alleles or deleterious substitutions in conserved residues of the histone acetyltransferase domain. Functionally, the mutations impaired histone acetylation and transcriptional regulation of CREBBP targets, including glucocorticoid responsive genes. Several mutations acquired at relapse were detected in subclones at diagnosis, suggesting that the mutations may confer resistance to therapy. These results extend the landscape of genetic alterations in leukaemia, and identify mutations targeting transcriptional and epigenetic regulation as a mechanism of resistance in ALL.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3076610/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3076610/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mullighan, Charles G -- Zhang, Jinghui -- Kasper, Lawryn H -- Lerach, Stephanie -- Payne-Turner, Debbie -- Phillips, Letha A -- Heatley, Sue L -- Holmfeldt, Linda -- Collins-Underwood, J Racquel -- Ma, Jing -- Buetow, Kenneth H -- Pui, Ching-Hon -- Baker, Sharyn D -- Brindle, Paul K -- Downing, James R -- DE018183/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA021765/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA021765-31/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R21 DE018183/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- R21 DE018183-02/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 10;471(7337):235-9. doi: 10.1038/nature09727.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21390130" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetylation ; CREB-Binding Protein/chemistry/*genetics/metabolism ; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Histone Acetyltransferases/genetics/metabolism ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Mutation/*genetics ; Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/*genetics ; Protein Structure, Tertiary/genetics ; Recurrence
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-09-06
    Description: The ability to design proteins with high affinity and selectivity for any given small molecule is a rigorous test of our understanding of the physiochemical principles that govern molecular recognition. Attempts to rationally design ligand-binding proteins have met with little success, however, and the computational design of protein-small-molecule interfaces remains an unsolved problem. Current approaches for designing ligand-binding proteins for medical and biotechnological uses rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in immunized animals and/or performing laboratory-directed evolution of proteins with an existing low affinity for the desired ligand, neither of which allows complete control over the interactions involved in binding. Here we describe a general computational method for designing pre-organized and shape complementary small-molecule-binding sites, and use it to generate protein binders to the steroid digoxigenin (DIG). Of seventeen experimentally characterized designs, two bind DIG; the model of the higher affinity binder has the most energetically favourable and pre-organized interface in the design set. A comprehensive binding-fitness landscape of this design, generated by library selections and deep sequencing, was used to optimize its binding affinity to a picomolar level, and X-ray co-crystal structures of two variants show atomic-level agreement with the corresponding computational models. The optimized binder is selective for DIG over the related steroids digitoxigenin, progesterone and beta-oestradiol, and this steroid binding preference can be reprogrammed by manipulation of explicitly designed hydrogen-bonding interactions. The computational design method presented here should enable the development of a new generation of biosensors, therapeutics and diagnostics.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3898436/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3898436/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tinberg, Christine E -- Khare, Sagar D -- Dou, Jiayi -- Doyle, Lindsey -- Nelson, Jorgen W -- Schena, Alberto -- Jankowski, Wojciech -- Kalodimos, Charalampos G -- Johnsson, Kai -- Stoddard, Barry L -- Baker, David -- P41 GM103533/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM049857/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 HG000035/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 HG00035/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Sep 12;501(7466):212-6. doi: 10.1038/nature12443. Epub 2013 Sep 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24005320" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Biotechnology ; *Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Digoxigenin/chemistry/*metabolism ; *Drug Design ; Estradiol/chemistry/metabolism ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Progesterone/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Proteins/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Reproducibility of Results ; Substrate Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-05-30
    Description: The self-assembly of proteins into highly ordered nanoscale architectures is a hallmark of biological systems. The sophisticated functions of these molecular machines have inspired the development of methods to engineer self-assembling protein nanostructures; however, the design of multi-component protein nanomaterials with high accuracy remains an outstanding challenge. Here we report a computational method for designing protein nanomaterials in which multiple copies of two distinct subunits co-assemble into a specific architecture. We use the method to design five 24-subunit cage-like protein nanomaterials in two distinct symmetric architectures and experimentally demonstrate that their structures are in close agreement with the computational design models. The accuracy of the method and the number and variety of two-component materials that it makes accessible suggest a route to the construction of functional protein nanomaterials tailored to specific applications.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4137318/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4137318/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉King, Neil P -- Bale, Jacob B -- Sheffler, William -- McNamara, Dan E -- Gonen, Shane -- Gonen, Tamir -- Yeates, Todd O -- Baker, David -- T32 GM067555/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32GM067555/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jun 5;510(7503):103-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13404. Epub 2014 May 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Institute for Protein Design, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2]. ; UCLA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 19700 Helix Drive, Ashburn, Virginia 20147, USA. ; Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 19700 Helix Drive, Ashburn, Virginia 20147, USA. ; 1] UCLA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA [2] UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA [3] UCLA Molecular Biology Institute, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Institute for Protein Design, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24870237" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Drug Design ; Models, Molecular ; Nanostructures/*chemistry/ultrastructure ; Protein Subunits/chemistry ; Proteins/*chemistry/ultrastructure
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-02-07
    Description: Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260937/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260937/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Correia, Bruno E -- Bates, John T -- Loomis, Rebecca J -- Baneyx, Gretchen -- Carrico, Chris -- Jardine, Joseph G -- Rupert, Peter -- Correnti, Colin -- Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr -- Vittal, Vinayak -- Connell, Mary J -- Stevens, Eric -- Schroeter, Alexandria -- Chen, Man -- Macpherson, Skye -- Serra, Andreia M -- Adachi, Yumiko -- Holmes, Margaret A -- Li, Yuxing -- Klevit, Rachel E -- Graham, Barney S -- Wyatt, Richard T -- Baker, David -- Strong, Roland K -- Crowe, James E Jr -- Johnson, Philip R -- Schief, William R -- 1R01AI102766-01A1/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 1UM1AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 2T32GM007270/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- 5R21AI088554/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI094419/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01AI094419/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 AI036214/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 AI045008/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30AI36214/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI102766/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI088554/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA080416/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007270/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32CA080416/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI 005714/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI057141/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UM1 AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 13;507(7491):201-6. doi: 10.1038/nature12966. Epub 2014 Feb 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] PhD Program in Computational Biology, Instituto Gulbenkian Ciencia and Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras 2780-157, Portugal [3] Department of Chemical Physiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [4] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA [2] Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA [3] Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24499818" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Animals ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/analysis/immunology ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis/immunology ; Antibodies, Viral/analysis/immunology ; Antigens, Viral/chemistry/immunology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; *Drug Design ; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay ; Epitopes/*chemistry/*immunology ; Macaca mulatta/immunology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Models, Molecular ; Neutralization Tests ; Protein Conformation ; *Protein Stability ; Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/*chemistry/*immunology ; Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/chemistry/immunology
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-12-18
    Description: Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures--which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks--is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed alpha-solenoid repeat structures (alpha-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed alpha-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that--to our knowledge--is not yet present in the protein structure database.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4727831/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4727831/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Doyle, Lindsey -- Hallinan, Jazmine -- Bolduc, Jill -- Parmeggiani, Fabio -- Baker, David -- Stoddard, Barry L -- Bradley, Philip -- R01 GM049857/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM115545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM49857/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R21 GM106117/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R21GM106117/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Dec 24;528(7583):585-8. doi: 10.1038/nature16191. Epub 2015 Dec 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue N., Seattle, Washington 98109, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Institute for Protein Design, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue N., Seattle, Washington 98019, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26675735" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Amino Acid Motifs ; *Bioengineering ; *Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Databases, Protein ; Models, Molecular ; *Protein Structure, Secondary ; Proteins/*chemistry ; Reproducibility of Results
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-04-22
    Description: Genetic methods of manipulating or eradicating disease vector populations have long been discussed as an attractive alternative to existing control measures because of their potential advantages in terms of effectiveness and species specificity. The development of genetically engineered malaria-resistant mosquitoes has shown, as a proof of principle, the possibility of targeting the mosquito's ability to serve as a disease vector. The translation of these achievements into control measures requires an effective technology to spread a genetic modification from laboratory mosquitoes to field populations. We have suggested previously that homing endonuclease genes (HEGs), a class of simple selfish genetic elements, could be exploited for this purpose. Here we demonstrate that a synthetic genetic element, consisting of mosquito regulatory regions and the homing endonuclease gene I-SceI, can substantially increase its transmission to the progeny in transgenic mosquitoes of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. We show that the I-SceI element is able to invade receptive mosquito cage populations rapidly, validating mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of HEGs. Molecular analyses confirm that expression of I-SceI in the male germline induces high rates of site-specific chromosomal cleavage and gene conversion, which results in the gain of the I-SceI gene, and underlies the observed genetic drive. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which genetic control measures can be implemented. Our results also show in principle how sequence-specific genetic drive elements like HEGs could be used to take the step from the genetic engineering of individuals to the genetic engineering of populations.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3093433/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3093433/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Windbichler, Nikolai -- Menichelli, Miriam -- Papathanos, Philippos Aris -- Thyme, Summer B -- Li, Hui -- Ulge, Umut Y -- Hovde, Blake T -- Baker, David -- Monnat, Raymond J Jr -- Burt, Austin -- Crisanti, Andrea -- CA133831/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RL1 CA133831/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RL1 CA133831-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RL1 CA133831-02/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RL1 CA133831-03/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RL1 CA133831-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RL1 CA133831-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RL1 GM084433/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RL1 GM084433-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RL1 GM084433-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RL1 GM084433-03/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RL1 GM084433-04/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RL1 GM084433-05/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA080416/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 May 12;473(7346):212-5. doi: 10.1038/nature09937. Epub 2011 Apr 20.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Imperial College London, Department of Life Sciences, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21508956" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Animals, Genetically Modified ; Anopheles gambiae/*genetics ; Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific/genetics ; Female ; Genes, Reporter/genetics ; *Genetic Engineering ; Genotype ; Insect Vectors/*genetics ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mosquito Control/*methods ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-07-18
    Description: Protein stability, assembly, localization and regulation often depend on the formation of disulphide crosslinks between cysteine side chains. Enzymes known as sulphydryl oxidases catalyse de novo disulphide formation and initiate intra- and intermolecular dithiol/disulphide relays to deliver the disulphides to substrate proteins. Quiescin sulphydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a unique, multi-domain disulphide catalyst that is localized primarily to the Golgi apparatus and secreted fluids and has attracted attention owing to its overproduction in tumours. In addition to its physiological importance, QSOX is a mechanistically intriguing enzyme, encompassing functions typically carried out by a series of proteins in other disulphide-formation pathways. How disulphides are relayed through the multiple redox-active sites of QSOX and whether there is a functional benefit to concatenating these sites on a single polypeptide are open questions. Here we present the first crystal structure of an intact QSOX enzyme, derived from a trypanosome parasite. Notably, sequential sites in the disulphide relay were found more than 40 A apart in this structure, too far for direct disulphide transfer. To resolve this puzzle, we trapped and crystallized an intermediate in the disulphide hand-off, which showed a 165 degrees domain rotation relative to the original structure, bringing the two active sites within disulphide-bonding distance. The comparable structure of a mammalian QSOX enzyme, also presented here, shows further biochemical features that facilitate disulphide transfer in metazoan orthologues. Finally, we quantified the contribution of concatenation to QSOX activity, providing general lessons for the understanding of multi-domain enzymes and the design of new catalytic relays.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3521037/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3521037/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Alon, Assaf -- Grossman, Iris -- Gat, Yair -- Kodali, Vamsi K -- DiMaio, Frank -- Mehlman, Tevie -- Haran, Gilad -- Baker, David -- Thorpe, Colin -- Fass, Deborah -- GM26643/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 RR001081/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM026643/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 16;488(7411):414-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11267.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Structural Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22801504" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Animals ; Biocatalysis ; Catalytic Domain ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/*metabolism ; Humans ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Oxidation-Reduction ; Oxidoreductases/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Rotation ; Trypanosoma brucei brucei/*enzymology
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-11-09
    Description: Unlike random heteropolymers, natural proteins fold into unique ordered structures. Understanding how these are encoded in amino-acid sequences is complicated by energetically unfavourable non-ideal features--for example kinked alpha-helices, bulged beta-strands, strained loops and buried polar groups--that arise in proteins from evolutionary selection for biological function or from neutral drift. Here we describe an approach to designing ideal protein structures stabilized by completely consistent local and non-local interactions. The approach is based on a set of rules relating secondary structure patterns to protein tertiary motifs, which make possible the design of funnel-shaped protein folding energy landscapes leading into the target folded state. Guided by these rules, we designed sequences predicted to fold into ideal protein structures consisting of alpha-helices, beta-strands and minimal loops. Designs for five different topologies were found to be monomeric and very stable and to adopt structures in solution nearly identical to the computational models. These results illuminate how the folding funnels of natural proteins arise and provide the foundation for engineering a new generation of functional proteins free from natural evolution.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705962/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705962/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Koga, Nobuyasu -- Tatsumi-Koga, Rie -- Liu, Gaohua -- Xiao, Rong -- Acton, Thomas B -- Montelione, Gaetano T -- Baker, David -- U54 GM094597/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 8;491(7423):222-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11600.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23135467" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Computer Simulation ; *Models, Molecular ; *Protein Folding ; *Protein Stability ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Proteins/*chemistry ; Thermodynamics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-06-16
    Description: Pathogenic bacteria using a type III secretion system (T3SS) to manipulate host cells cause many different infections including Shigella dysentery, typhoid fever, enterohaemorrhagic colitis and bubonic plague. An essential part of the T3SS is a hollow needle-like protein filament through which effector proteins are injected into eukaryotic host cells. Currently, the three-dimensional structure of the needle is unknown because it is not amenable to X-ray crystallography and solution NMR, as a result of its inherent non-crystallinity and insolubility. Cryo-electron microscopy combined with crystal or solution NMR subunit structures has recently provided a powerful hybrid approach for studying supramolecular assemblies, resulting in low-resolution and medium-resolution models. However, such approaches cannot deliver atomic details, especially of the crucial subunit-subunit interfaces, because of the limited cryo-electron microscopic resolution obtained in these studies. Here we report an alternative approach combining recombinant wild-type needle production, solid-state NMR, electron microscopy and Rosetta modelling to reveal the supramolecular interfaces and ultimately the complete atomic structure of the Salmonella typhimurium T3SS needle. We show that the 80-residue subunits form a right-handed helical assembly with roughly 11 subunits per two turns, similar to that of the flagellar filament of S. typhimurium. In contrast to established models of the needle in which the amino terminus of the protein subunit was assumed to be alpha-helical and positioned inside the needle, our model reveals an extended amino-terminal domain that is positioned on the surface of the needle, while the highly conserved carboxy terminus points towards the lumen.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3598588/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3598588/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Loquet, Antoine -- Sgourakis, Nikolaos G -- Gupta, Rashmi -- Giller, Karin -- Riedel, Dietmar -- Goosmann, Christian -- Griesinger, Christian -- Kolbe, Michael -- Baker, David -- Becker, Stefan -- Lange, Adam -- 1R01GM092802-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM092802/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 20;486(7402):276-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11079.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of NMR-based Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Gottingen, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22699623" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Bacterial Secretion Systems ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Microscopy, Electron ; *Models, Molecular ; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Salmonella typhimurium/*chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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