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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-05-31
    Description: Recent analyses of metabolic rates in fishes, echinoderms, crustaceans and cephalopods have concluded that bathymetric declines in temperature- and mass-normalized metabolic rate do not result from resource-limitation (e.g. oxygen or food/chemical energy), decreasing temperature or increasing hydrostatic pressure. Instead, based on contrasting bathymetric patterns reported in the metabolic rates of visual and non-visual taxa, declining metabolic rate with depth is proposed to result from relaxation of selection for high locomotory capacity in visual predators as light diminishes. Here, we present metabolic rates of Holothuroidea, a non-visual benthic and benthopelagic echinoderm class, determined in situ at abyssal depths (greater than 4000 m depth). Mean temperature- and mass-normalized metabolic rate did not differ significantly between shallow-water (less than 200 m depth) and bathyal (200–4000 m depth) holothurians, but was significantly lower in abyssal (greater than 4000 m depth) holothurians than in shallow-water holothurians. These results support the dominance of the visual interactions hypothesis at bathyal depths, but indicate that ecological or evolutionary pressures other than biotic visual interactions contribute to bathymetric variation in holothurian metabolic rates. Multiple nonlinear regression assuming power or exponential models indicates that in situ hydrostatic pressure and/or food/chemical energy availability are responsible for variation in holothurian metabolic rates. Consequently, these results have implications for modelling deep-sea energetics and processes.
    Keywords: physiology, ecology, evolution
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
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  • 2
    Unknown
    Park Ridge, N.J., U.S.A. : Noyes Data Corp.
    Call number: 03-N:47
    Keywords: Transdermal medication ; Dermatologic Agents
    Notes: Includes index.
    Pages: xi, 305 : ill.
    ISBN: 0815509847
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    03-N:47 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 3
    Keywords: DISEASE ; DISEASES ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; RNA ; DNA ; recombination ; tumour ; BIOLOGY ; SEQUENCE ; chromosome ; NUMBER ; MUTATION ; inactivation ; REGION ; MUTATIONS ; EVOLUTION ; DEGRADATION ; CHROMOSOMES ; GENE FAMILY ; AID ; HUMAN GENOME SEQUENCE ; INACTIVATION CENTER ; LINKED MENTAL-RETARDATION ; MAMMALIAN Y-CHROMOSOME ; REPEAT HYPOTHESIS
    Abstract: The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15772651
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODELS ; POPULATION ; RISK ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; PHENOTYPE ; PREVALENCE ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; Risk prediction
    Abstract: ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumor. METHODS: We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumor, to assess the associations of twelve loci with breast cancer tumor characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. RESULTS: The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for eleven loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, SNP rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele HR for ER-positive=1.35, 95%CI:1.17-1.56 vs HR=0.91, 95%CI:0.85-0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity=6.5e-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. CONCLUSIONS: The associations of the twelve SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumor subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models may improve clinical management for mutation carriers.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22053997
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-05-13
    Description: Fungi are the principal degraders of biomass in terrestrial ecosystems and establish important interactions with plants and animals. However, our current understanding of fungal evolutionary diversity is incomplete and is based upon species amenable to growth in culture. These culturable fungi are typically yeast or filamentous forms, bound by a rigid cell wall rich in chitin. Evolution of this body plan was thought critical for the success of the Fungi, enabling them to adapt to heterogeneous habitats and live by osmotrophy: extracellular digestion followed by nutrient uptake. Here we investigate the ecology and cell biology of a previously undescribed and highly diverse form of eukaryotic life that branches with the Fungi, using environmental DNA analyses combined with fluorescent detection via DNA probes. This clade is present in numerous ecosystems including soil, freshwater and aquatic sediments. Phylogenetic analyses using multiple ribosomal RNA genes place this clade with Rozella, the putative primary branch of the fungal kingdom. Tyramide signal amplification coupled with group-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals that the target cells are small eukaryotes of 3-5 mum in length, capable of forming a microtubule-based flagellum. Co-staining with cell wall markers demonstrates that representatives from the clade do not produce a chitin-rich cell wall during any of the life cycle stages observed and therefore do not conform to the standard fungal body plan. We name this highly diverse clade the cryptomycota in anticipation of formal classification.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jones, Meredith D M -- Forn, Irene -- Gadelha, Catarina -- Egan, Martin J -- Bass, David -- Massana, Ramon -- Richards, Thomas A -- England -- Nature. 2011 May 11;474(7350):200-3. doi: 10.1038/nature09984.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21562490" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Biodiversity ; Cell Wall/chemistry ; Chitin/analysis/deficiency ; DNA, Fungal/analysis/genetics ; DNA, Ribosomal/analysis/genetics ; Flagella/physiology ; Fungi/*classification/*cytology/genetics/growth & development ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Life Cycle Stages ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Phylogeny ; RNA, Ribosomal/genetics ; Sequence Alignment
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-02-26
    Description: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-beta, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bailey, Peter -- Chang, David K -- Nones, Katia -- Johns, Amber L -- Patch, Ann-Marie -- Gingras, Marie-Claude -- Miller, David K -- Christ, Angelika N -- Bruxner, Tim J C -- Quinn, Michael C -- Nourse, Craig -- Murtaugh, L Charles -- Harliwong, Ivon -- Idrisoglu, Senel -- Manning, Suzanne -- Nourbakhsh, Ehsan -- Wani, Shivangi -- Fink, Lynn -- Holmes, Oliver -- Chin, Venessa -- Anderson, Matthew J -- Kazakoff, Stephen -- Leonard, Conrad -- Newell, Felicity -- Waddell, Nick -- Wood, Scott -- Xu, Qinying -- Wilson, Peter J -- Cloonan, Nicole -- Kassahn, Karin S -- Taylor, Darrin -- Quek, Kelly -- Robertson, Alan -- Pantano, Lorena -- Mincarelli, Laura -- Sanchez, Luis N -- Evers, Lisa -- Wu, Jianmin -- Pinese, Mark -- Cowley, Mark J -- Jones, Marc D -- Colvin, Emily K -- Nagrial, Adnan M -- Humphrey, Emily S -- Chantrill, Lorraine A -- Mawson, Amanda -- Humphris, Jeremy -- Chou, Angela -- Pajic, Marina -- Scarlett, Christopher J -- Pinho, Andreia V -- Giry-Laterriere, Marc -- Rooman, Ilse -- Samra, Jaswinder S -- Kench, James G -- Lovell, Jessica A -- Merrett, Neil D -- Toon, Christopher W -- Epari, Krishna -- Nguyen, Nam Q -- Barbour, Andrew -- Zeps, Nikolajs -- Moran-Jones, Kim -- Jamieson, Nigel B -- Graham, Janet S -- Duthie, Fraser -- Oien, Karin -- Hair, Jane -- Grutzmann, Robert -- Maitra, Anirban -- Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A -- Wolfgang, Christopher L -- Morgan, Richard A -- Lawlor, Rita T -- Corbo, Vincenzo -- Bassi, Claudio -- Rusev, Borislav -- Capelli, Paola -- Salvia, Roberto -- Tortora, Giampaolo -- Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata -- Petersen, Gloria M -- Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative -- Munzy, Donna M -- Fisher, William E -- Karim, Saadia A -- Eshleman, James R -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Pilarsky, Christian -- Morton, Jennifer P -- Sansom, Owen J -- Scarpa, Aldo -- Musgrove, Elizabeth A -- Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo -- Hofmann, Oliver -- Sutherland, Robert L -- Wheeler, David A -- Gill, Anthony J -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Pearson, John V -- Waddell, Nicola -- Biankin, Andrew V -- Grimmond, Sean M -- 103721/Z/14/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- A12481/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A18076/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- C29717/A17263/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 3;531(7592):47-52. doi: 10.1038/nature16965. Epub 2016 Feb 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. ; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. ; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. ; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. ; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. ; Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. ; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. ; School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. ; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. ; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. ; School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. ; Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. ; Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. ; School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. ; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. ; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. ; Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. ; GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. ; Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. ; Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. ; The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. ; Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. ; ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. ; Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. ; Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. ; University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26909576" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic ; Ductal/classification/genetics/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; DNA Methylation ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Regulatory Networks ; Genes, Neoplasm/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3-beta/genetics ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3-gamma/genetics ; Histone Demethylases/genetics ; Homeodomain Proteins/genetics ; Humans ; Mice ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*classification/*genetics/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Prognosis ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/genetics ; Survival Analysis ; Trans-Activators/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Transcription, Genetic ; Transcriptome ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-09-05
    Description: Helicobacter pylori is a human pathogen that infects the stomach, where it experiences variable pH. To survive the acidic gastric conditions, H. pylori produces large quantities of urease, a nickel enzyme that hydrolyzes urea to ammonia, which neutralizes the local environment. One of the regulators of urease expression in H....
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-10-04
    Description: Tasmanian devils have spawned two transmissible cancer clones, known as devil facial tumour 1 (DFT1) and devil facial tumour 2 (DFT2). DFT1 and DFT2 are transmitted between animals by the transfer of allogeneic contagious cancer cells by biting, and both cause facial tumours. DFT1 and DFT2 tumours are grossly indistinguishable, but can be differentiated using histopathology, cytogenetics or genotyping of polymorphic markers. However, standard diagnostic methods require specialist skills and equipment and entail long processing times. Here, we describe Tasman-PCR: a simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic assay that identifies and distinguishes DFT1 and DFT2 by amplification of DNA spanning tumour-specific interchromosomal translocations. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and specificity of this assay by testing DNA from 546 tumours and 804 normal devils. A temporal–spatial screen confirmed the reported geographic ranges of DFT1 and DFT2 and did not provide evidence of additional DFT clones. DFT2 affects disproportionately more males than females, and devils can be co-infected with DFT1 and DFT2. Overall, we present a PCR-based assay that delivers rapid, accurate and high-throughput diagnosis of DFT1 and DFT2. This tool provides an additional resource for devil disease management and may assist with ongoing conservation efforts.
    Keywords: genetics
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: All cancers carry somatic mutations in their genomes. A subset, known as driver mutations, confer clonal selective advantage on cancer cells and are causally implicated in oncogenesis, and the remainder are passenger mutations. The driver mutations and mutational processes operative in breast cancer have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here we examine the genomes of 100 tumours for somatic copy number changes and mutations in the coding exons of protein-coding genes. The number of somatic mutations varied markedly between individual tumours. We found strong correlations between mutation number, age at which cancer was diagnosed and cancer histological grade, and observed multiple mutational signatures, including one present in about ten per cent of tumours characterized by numerous mutations of cytosine at TpC dinucleotides. Driver mutations were identified in several new cancer genes including AKT2, ARID1B, CASP8, CDKN1B, MAP3K1, MAP3K13, NCOR1, SMARCD1 and TBX3. Among the 100 tumours, we found driver mutations in at least 40 cancer genes and 73 different combinations of mutated cancer genes. The results highlight the substantial genetic diversity underlying this common disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428862/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428862/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Stephens, Philip J -- Tarpey, Patrick S -- Davies, Helen -- Van Loo, Peter -- Greenman, Chris -- Wedge, David C -- Nik-Zainal, Serena -- Martin, Sancha -- Varela, Ignacio -- Bignell, Graham R -- Yates, Lucy R -- Papaemmanuil, Elli -- Beare, David -- Butler, Adam -- Cheverton, Angela -- Gamble, John -- Hinton, Jonathan -- Jia, Mingming -- Jayakumar, Alagu -- Jones, David -- Latimer, Calli -- Lau, King Wai -- McLaren, Stuart -- McBride, David J -- Menzies, Andrew -- Mudie, Laura -- Raine, Keiran -- Rad, Roland -- Chapman, Michael Spencer -- Teague, Jon -- Easton, Douglas -- Langerod, Anita -- Oslo Breast Cancer Consortium (OSBREAC) -- Lee, Ming Ta Michael -- Shen, Chen-Yang -- Tee, Benita Tan Kiat -- Huimin, Bernice Wong -- Broeks, Annegien -- Vargas, Ana Cristina -- Turashvili, Gulisa -- Martens, John -- Fatima, Aquila -- Miron, Penelope -- Chin, Suet-Feung -- Thomas, Gilles -- Boyault, Sandrine -- Mariani, Odette -- Lakhani, Sunil R -- van de Vijver, Marc -- van 't Veer, Laura -- Foekens, John -- Desmedt, Christine -- Sotiriou, Christos -- Tutt, Andrew -- Caldas, Carlos -- Reis-Filho, Jorge S -- Aparicio, Samuel A J R -- Salomon, Anne Vincent -- Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise -- Richardson, Andrea L -- Campbell, Peter J -- Futreal, P Andrew -- Stratton, Michael R -- 077012/Z/05/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 093867/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 10118/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- CA089393/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- WT088340MA/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Chief Scientist Office/United Kingdom -- Department of Health/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 16;486(7403):400-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11017.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722201" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age Factors ; Breast Neoplasms/classification/*genetics/pathology ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/*genetics ; Cytosine/metabolism ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Female ; Humans ; JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism ; Mutagenesis/*genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neoplasm Grading ; Oncogenes/*genetics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Signal Transduction/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-10-30
    Description: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3530898/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3530898/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Biankin, Andrew V -- Waddell, Nicola -- Kassahn, Karin S -- Gingras, Marie-Claude -- Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B -- Johns, Amber L -- Miller, David K -- Wilson, Peter J -- Patch, Ann-Marie -- Wu, Jianmin -- Chang, David K -- Cowley, Mark J -- Gardiner, Brooke B -- Song, Sarah -- Harliwong, Ivon -- Idrisoglu, Senel -- Nourse, Craig -- Nourbakhsh, Ehsan -- Manning, Suzanne -- Wani, Shivangi -- Gongora, Milena -- Pajic, Marina -- Scarlett, Christopher J -- Gill, Anthony J -- Pinho, Andreia V -- Rooman, Ilse -- Anderson, Matthew -- Holmes, Oliver -- Leonard, Conrad -- Taylor, Darrin -- Wood, Scott -- Xu, Qinying -- Nones, Katia -- Fink, J Lynn -- Christ, Angelika -- Bruxner, Tim -- Cloonan, Nicole -- Kolle, Gabriel -- Newell, Felicity -- Pinese, Mark -- Mead, R Scott -- Humphris, Jeremy L -- Kaplan, Warren -- Jones, Marc D -- Colvin, Emily K -- Nagrial, Adnan M -- Humphrey, Emily S -- Chou, Angela -- Chin, Venessa T -- Chantrill, Lorraine A -- Mawson, Amanda -- Samra, Jaswinder S -- Kench, James G -- Lovell, Jessica A -- Daly, Roger J -- Merrett, Neil D -- Toon, Christopher -- Epari, Krishna -- Nguyen, Nam Q -- Barbour, Andrew -- Zeps, Nikolajs -- Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative -- Kakkar, Nipun -- Zhao, Fengmei -- Wu, Yuan Qing -- Wang, Min -- Muzny, Donna M -- Fisher, William E -- Brunicardi, F Charles -- Hodges, Sally E -- Reid, Jeffrey G -- Drummond, Jennifer -- Chang, Kyle -- Han, Yi -- Lewis, Lora R -- Dinh, Huyen -- Buhay, Christian J -- Beck, Timothy -- Timms, Lee -- Sam, Michelle -- Begley, Kimberly -- Brown, Andrew -- Pai, Deepa -- Panchal, Ami -- Buchner, Nicholas -- De Borja, Richard -- Denroche, Robert E -- Yung, Christina K -- Serra, Stefano -- Onetto, Nicole -- Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata -- Tsao, Ming-Sound -- Shaw, Patricia A -- Petersen, Gloria M -- Gallinger, Steven -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Maitra, Anirban -- Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A -- Schulick, Richard D -- Wolfgang, Christopher L -- Morgan, Richard A -- Lawlor, Rita T -- Capelli, Paola -- Corbo, Vincenzo -- Scardoni, Maria -- Tortora, Giampaolo -- Tempero, Margaret A -- Mann, Karen M -- Jenkins, Nancy A -- Perez-Mancera, Pedro A -- Adams, David J -- Largaespada, David A -- Wessels, Lodewyk F A -- Rust, Alistair G -- Stein, Lincoln D -- Tuveson, David A -- Copeland, Neal G -- Musgrove, Elizabeth A -- Scarpa, Aldo -- Eshleman, James R -- Hudson, Thomas J -- Sutherland, Robert L -- Wheeler, David A -- Pearson, John V -- McPherson, John D -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Grimmond, Sean M -- 13031/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- 2P50CA101955/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA134292/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA101955/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA102701/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50CA062924/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA097075/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA97075/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 15;491(7424):399-405. doi: 10.1038/nature11547. Epub 2012 Oct 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103869" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Axons/*metabolism ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/*genetics/*pathology ; Gene Dosage ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genome/*genetics ; Humans ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; Mice ; Mutation ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology ; Proteins/genetics ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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