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  • 1
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; carcinoma ; polymorphism ; BREAST-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; UDP-GLUCURONOSYLTRANSFERASES ; IRON TRANSPORT ; FAMILY SLC25 ; HEPHAESTIN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Defective cellular transport processes can lead to aberrant accumulation of trace elements, iron, small molecules and hormones in the cell, which in turn may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, promoting DNA damage and aberrant expression of key regulatory cancer genes. As DNA damage and uncontrolled proliferation are hallmarks of cancer, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we hypothesized that inherited variation in the cellular transport genes contributes to EOC risk. METHODS: In total, DNA samples were obtained from 14,525 case subjects with invasive EOC and from 23,447 controls from 43 sites in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Two hundred seventy nine SNPs, representing 131 genes, were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium iSelect BeadChip as part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNP analyses were conducted using unconditional logistic regression under a log-additive model, and the FDR q〈0.2 was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: The most significant evidence of an association for all invasive cancers combined and for the serous subtype was observed for SNP rs17216603 in the iron transporter gene HEPH (invasive: OR = 0.85, P = 0.00026; serous: OR = 0.81, P = 0.00020); this SNP was also associated with the borderline/low malignant potential (LMP) tumors (P = 0.021). Other genes significantly associated with EOC histological subtypes (p〈0.05) included the UGT1A (endometrioid), SLC25A45 (mucinous), SLC39A11 (low malignant potential), and SERPINA7 (clear cell carcinoma). In addition, 1785 SNPs in six genes (HEPH, MGST1, SERPINA, SLC25A45, SLC39A11 and UGT1A) were imputed from the 1000 Genomes Project and examined for association with INV EOC in white-European subjects. The most significant imputed SNP was rs117729793 in SLC39A11 (per allele, OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.5-4.35, p = 5.66x10-4). CONCLUSION: These results, generated on a large cohort of women, revealed associations between inherited cellular transport gene variants and risk of EOC histologic subtypes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26091520
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  • 2
    Keywords: RISK ; FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION ; BINDING-SITES ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MICRORNA EXPRESSION ; PARKINSON-DISEASE ; GENETIC-VARIANTS ; SITE POLYMORPHISMS ; COMMON INVERSION ; MAPT REGION
    Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has a heritable component that remains to be fully characterized. Most identified common susceptibility variants lie in non-protein-coding sequences. We hypothesized that variants in the 3' untranslated region at putative microRNA (miRNA)-binding sites represent functional targets that influence EOC susceptibility. Here, we evaluate the association between 767 miRNA-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) and EOC risk in 18,174 EOC cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies genotyped through the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study. We identify several miRSNPs associated with invasive serous EOC risk (odds ratio=1.12, P=10(-8)) mapping to an inversion polymorphism at 17q21.31. Additional genotyping of non-miRSNPs at 17q21.31 reveals stronger signals outside the inversion (P=10(-10)). Variation at 17q21.31 is associated with neurological diseases, and our collaboration is the first to report an association with EOC susceptibility. An integrated molecular analysis in this region provides evidence for ARHGAP27 and PLEKHM1 as candidate EOC susceptibility genes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23535648
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  • 3
    Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P 〈 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value 〈0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) 〈0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26399219
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-05-16
    Description: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b01565
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-05-19
    Description: Introduction Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) prevent disease through both direct protection of vaccinated individuals and indirect protection of unvaccinated individuals by reducing nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage and transmission of vaccine-type (VT) pneumococci. While the indirect effects of PCV vaccination are well described, the PCV coverage required to achieve the indirect effects is unknown. We will investigate the relationship between PCV coverage and VT carriage among undervaccinated children using hospital-based NP pneumococcal carriage surveillance at three sites in Asia and the Pacific. Methods and analysis We are recruiting cases, defined as children aged 2–59 months admitted to participating hospitals with acute respiratory infection in Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mongolia and Papua New Guinea. Thirteen-valent PCV status is obtained from written records. NP swabs are collected according to standard methods, screened using lytA qPCR and serotyped by microarray. Village-level vaccination coverage, for the resident communities of the recruited cases, is determined using administrative data or community survey. Our analysis will investigate the relationship between VT carriage among undervaccinated cases (indirect effects) and vaccine coverage using generalised estimating equations. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the relevant ethics committees at participating sites. The results are intended for publication in open-access peer-reviewed journals and will demonstrate methods suitable for low- and middle-income countries to monitor vaccine impact and inform vaccine policy makers about the PCV coverage required to achieve indirect protection.
    Keywords: Public health, Open access, Global health
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-03-09
    Description: Elevated Bcl-xL expression in cancer cells contributes to doxorubicin (DOX) resistance, leading to failure in chemotherapy. In addition, the clinical use of high-dose doxorubicin (DOX) in cancer therapy has been limited by issues with cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Here, we show that co-treatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) attenuates DOX-induced apoptosis in Chang-L liver cells and human hepatocytes, but overcomes DOX resistance in Bcl-xL-overexpressing Chang-L cells and several hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines with high Bcl-xL expression. Additionally, combined treatment with DOX and PDTC markedly retarded tumor growth in a Huh-7 HCC cell xenograft tumor model, compared to either mono-treatment. These results suggest that DOX/PDTC co-treatment may provide a safe and effective therapeutic strategy against malignant hepatoma cells with Bcl-xL-mediated apoptotic defects. We also found that induction of paraptosis, a cell death mode that is accompanied by dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, is involved in this anti-cancer effect of DOX/PDTC. The intracellular glutathione levels were reduced in Bcl-xL-overexpressing Chang-L cells treated with DOX/PDTC, and DOX/PDTC-induced paraptosis was effectively blocked by pretreatment with thiol-antioxidants, but not by non-thiol antioxidants. Collectively, our results suggest that disruption of thiol homeostasis may critically contribute to DOX/PDTC-induced paraptosis in Bcl-xL-overexpressing cells.
    Print ISSN: 0143-3334
    Electronic ISSN: 1460-2180
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-06-11
    Description: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase is a master growth promoter that nucleates two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Despite the diverse processes controlled by mTOR, few substrates are known. We defined the mTOR-regulated phosphoproteome by quantitative mass spectrometry and characterized the primary sequence motif specificity of mTOR using positional scanning peptide libraries. We found that the phosphorylation response to insulin is largely mTOR dependent and that mTOR exhibits a unique preference for proline, hydrophobic, and aromatic residues at the +1 position. The adaptor protein Grb10 was identified as an mTORC1 substrate that mediates the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase typical of cells lacking tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a tumor suppressor and negative regulator of mTORC1. Our work clarifies how mTORC1 inhibits growth factor signaling and opens new areas of investigation in mTOR biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177140/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177140/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hsu, Peggy P -- Kang, Seong A -- Rameseder, Jonathan -- Zhang, Yi -- Ottina, Kathleen A -- Lim, Daniel -- Peterson, Timothy R -- Choi, Yongmun -- Gray, Nathanael S -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Marto, Jarrod A -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM68762/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866-09/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jun 10;332(6035):1317-22. doi: 10.1126/science.1199498.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21659604" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; GRB10 Adaptor Protein/*metabolism ; Humans ; Insulin/metabolism ; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/*metabolism ; Mass Spectrometry ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes ; Naphthyridines/pharmacology ; Phosphoproteins/metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Proteins/*metabolism ; Proteome/metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; Sirolimus/pharmacology ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-07-28
    Description: The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase promotes growth and is the target of rapamycin, a clinically useful drug that also prolongs life span in model organisms. A persistent mystery is why the phosphorylation of many bona fide mTORC1 substrates is resistant to rapamycin. We find that the in vitro kinase activity of mTORC1 toward peptides encompassing established phosphorylation sites varies widely and correlates strongly with the resistance of the sites to rapamycin, as well as to nutrient and growth factor starvation within cells. Slight modifications of the sites were sufficient to alter mTORC1 activity toward them in vitro and to cause concomitant changes within cells in their sensitivity to rapamycin and starvation. Thus, the intrinsic capacity of a phosphorylation site to serve as an mTORC1 substrate, a property we call substrate quality, is a major determinant of its sensitivity to modulators of the pathway. Our results reveal a mechanism through which mTORC1 effectors can respond differentially to the same signals.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3771538/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3771538/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Seong A -- Pacold, Michael E -- Cervantes, Christopher L -- Lim, Daniel -- Lou, Hua Jane -- Ottina, Kathleen -- Gray, Nathanael S -- Turk, Benjamin E -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Sabatini, David M -- AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM59281/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 26;341(6144):1236566. doi: 10.1126/science.1236566.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23888043" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acids/metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Line ; Culture Media ; Humans ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes ; Naphthyridines/pharmacology ; Peptides/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Sirolimus/*pharmacology ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-04-13
    Description: Scaffold-assisted signaling cascades guide cellular decision-making. In budding yeast, one such signal transduction pathway called the mitotic exit network (MEN) governs the transition from mitosis to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The MEN is conserved and in metazoans is known as the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. We found that signaling through the MEN kinase cascade was mediated by an unusual two-step process. The MEN kinase Cdc15 first phosphorylated the scaffold Nud1. This created a phospho-docking site on Nud1, to which the effector kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 bound through a phosphoserine-threonine binding domain, in order to be activated by Cdc15. This mechanism of pathway activation has implications for signal transmission through other kinase cascades and might represent a general principle in scaffold-assisted signaling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3884217/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3884217/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rock, Jeremy M -- Lim, Daniel -- Stach, Lasse -- Ogrodowicz, Roksana W -- Keck, Jamie M -- Jones, Michele H -- Wong, Catherine C L -- Yates, John R 3rd -- Winey, Mark -- Smerdon, Stephen J -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Amon, Angelika -- CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM086038/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM056800/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM51312/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- MC_U117584228/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P30 CA014051/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103533/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM051312/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM056800/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R29 GM056800/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U117584228/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- U54 CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 17;340(6134):871-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1235822. Epub 2013 Apr 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23579499" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Anaphase ; Cell Cycle Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Deoxyribonucleases/chemistry/*metabolism ; Enzyme Activation ; GTP-Binding Proteins/*metabolism ; *Mitosis ; Phosphoproteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/cytology/*metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; tRNA Methyltransferases/chemistry/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Gemeinsame Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung (GMA) und des Arbeitskreises zur Weiterentwicklung der Lehre in der Zahnmedizin (AKWLZ); 20170920-20170923; Münster; DOC079 /20171124/
    Publication Date: 2017-11-24
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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