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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-07-27
    Description: Medulloblastoma is an aggressively growing tumour, arising in the cerebellum or medulla/brain stem. It is the most common malignant brain tumour in children, and shows tremendous biological and clinical heterogeneity. Despite recent treatment advances, approximately 40% of children experience tumour recurrence, and 30% will die from their disease. Those who survive often have a significantly reduced quality of life. Four tumour subgroups with distinct clinical, biological and genetic profiles are currently identified. WNT tumours, showing activated wingless pathway signalling, carry a favourable prognosis under current treatment regimens. SHH tumours show hedgehog pathway activation, and have an intermediate prognosis. Group 3 and 4 tumours are molecularly less well characterized, and also present the greatest clinical challenges. The full repertoire of genetic events driving this distinction, however, remains unclear. Here we describe an integrative deep-sequencing analysis of 125 tumour-normal pairs, conducted as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) PedBrain Tumor Project. Tetraploidy was identified as a frequent early event in Group 3 and 4 tumours, and a positive correlation between patient age and mutation rate was observed. Several recurrent mutations were identified, both in known medulloblastoma-related genes (CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4) and in genes not previously linked to this tumour (DDX3X, CTDNEP1, KDM6A, TBR1), often in subgroup-specific patterns. RNA sequencing confirmed these alterations, and revealed the expression of what are, to our knowledge, the first medulloblastoma fusion genes identified. Chromatin modifiers were frequently altered across all subgroups. These findings enhance our understanding of the genomic complexity and heterogeneity underlying medulloblastoma, and provide several potential targets for new therapeutics, especially for Group 3 and 4 patients.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662966/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662966/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jones, David T W -- Jager, Natalie -- Kool, Marcel -- Zichner, Thomas -- Hutter, Barbara -- Sultan, Marc -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- Pugh, Trevor J -- Hovestadt, Volker -- Stutz, Adrian M -- Rausch, Tobias -- Warnatz, Hans-Jorg -- Ryzhova, Marina -- Bender, Sebastian -- Sturm, Dominik -- Pleier, Sabrina -- Cin, Huriye -- Pfaff, Elke -- Sieber, Laura -- Wittmann, Andrea -- Remke, Marc -- Witt, Hendrik -- Hutter, Sonja -- Tzaridis, Theophilos -- Weischenfeldt, Joachim -- Raeder, Benjamin -- Avci, Meryem -- Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav -- Zapatka, Marc -- Weber, Ursula D -- Wang, Qi -- Lasitschka, Barbel -- Bartholomae, Cynthia C -- Schmidt, Manfred -- von Kalle, Christof -- Ast, Volker -- Lawerenz, Chris -- Eils, Jurgen -- Kabbe, Rolf -- Benes, Vladimir -- van Sluis, Peter -- Koster, Jan -- Volckmann, Richard -- Shih, David -- Betts, Matthew J -- Russell, Robert B -- Coco, Simona -- Tonini, Gian Paolo -- Schuller, Ulrich -- Hans, Volkmar -- Graf, Norbert -- Kim, Yoo-Jin -- Monoranu, Camelia -- Roggendorf, Wolfgang -- Unterberg, Andreas -- Herold-Mende, Christel -- Milde, Till -- Kulozik, Andreas E -- von Deimling, Andreas -- Witt, Olaf -- Maass, Eberhard -- Rossler, Jochen -- Ebinger, Martin -- Schuhmann, Martin U -- Fruhwald, Michael C -- Hasselblatt, Martin -- Jabado, Nada -- Rutkowski, Stefan -- von Bueren, Andre O -- Williamson, Dan -- Clifford, Steven C -- McCabe, Martin G -- Collins, V Peter -- Wolf, Stephan -- Wiemann, Stefan -- Lehrach, Hans -- Brors, Benedikt -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Felsberg, Jorg -- Reifenberger, Guido -- Northcott, Paul A -- Taylor, Michael D -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Pomeroy, Scott L -- Yaspo, Marie-Laure -- Korbel, Jan O -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Eils, Roland -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Lichter, Peter -- P30 HD018655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 2;488(7409):100-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11284.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22832583" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/genetics ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Cerebellar Neoplasms/classification/diagnosis/*genetics/pathology ; Child ; Chromatin/metabolism ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Hedgehog Proteins/metabolism ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Histone Demethylases/genetics ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/classification/diagnosis/*genetics/pathology ; Methylation ; Mutation/genetics ; Mutation Rate ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Oncogene Proteins, Fusion/genetics ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/genetics ; Polyploidy ; Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Signal Transduction ; T-Box Domain Proteins/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Wnt Proteins/metabolism ; beta Catenin/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-01-31
    Description: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal brain tumour in adults and children. However, DNA copy number and gene expression signatures indicate differences between adult and paediatric cases. To explore the genetic events underlying this distinction, we sequenced the exomes of 48 paediatric GBM samples. Somatic mutations in the H3.3-ATRX-DAXX chromatin remodelling pathway were identified in 44% of tumours (21/48). Recurrent mutations in H3F3A, which encodes the replication-independent histone 3 variant H3.3, were observed in 31% of tumours, and led to amino acid substitutions at two critical positions within the histone tail (K27M, G34R/G34V) involved in key regulatory post-translational modifications. Mutations in ATRX (alpha-thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked) and DAXX (death-domain associated protein), encoding two subunits of a chromatin remodelling complex required for H3.3 incorporation at pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres, were identified in 31% of samples overall, and in 100% of tumours harbouring a G34R or G34V H3.3 mutation. Somatic TP53 mutations were identified in 54% of all cases, and in 86% of samples with H3F3A and/or ATRX mutations. Screening of a large cohort of gliomas of various grades and histologies (n = 784) showed H3F3A mutations to be specific to GBM and highly prevalent in children and young adults. Furthermore, the presence of H3F3A/ATRX-DAXX/TP53 mutations was strongly associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres and specific gene expression profiles. This is, to our knowledge, the first report to highlight recurrent mutations in a regulatory histone in humans, and our data suggest that defects of the chromatin architecture underlie paediatric and young adult GBM pathogenesis.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schwartzentruber, Jeremy -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Liu, Xiao-Yang -- Jones, David T W -- Pfaff, Elke -- Jacob, Karine -- Sturm, Dominik -- Fontebasso, Adam M -- Quang, Dong-Anh Khuong -- Tonjes, Martje -- Hovestadt, Volker -- Albrecht, Steffen -- Kool, Marcel -- Nantel, Andre -- Konermann, Carolin -- Lindroth, Anders -- Jager, Natalie -- Rausch, Tobias -- Ryzhova, Marina -- Korbel, Jan O -- Hielscher, Thomas -- Hauser, Peter -- Garami, Miklos -- Klekner, Almos -- Bognar, Laszlo -- Ebinger, Martin -- Schuhmann, Martin U -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Pekrun, Arnulf -- Fruhwald, Michael C -- Roggendorf, Wolfgang -- Kramm, Christoph -- Durken, Matthias -- Atkinson, Jeffrey -- Lepage, Pierre -- Montpetit, Alexandre -- Zakrzewska, Magdalena -- Zakrzewski, Krzystof -- Liberski, Pawel P -- Dong, Zhifeng -- Siegel, Peter -- Kulozik, Andreas E -- Zapatka, Marc -- Guha, Abhijit -- Malkin, David -- Felsberg, Jorg -- Reifenberger, Guido -- von Deimling, Andreas -- Ichimura, Koichi -- Collins, V Peter -- Witt, Hendrik -- Milde, Till -- Witt, Olaf -- Zhang, Cindy -- Castelo-Branco, Pedro -- Lichter, Peter -- Faury, Damien -- Tabori, Uri -- Plass, Christoph -- Majewski, Jacek -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Jabado, Nada -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jan 29;482(7384):226-31. doi: 10.1038/nature10833.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1A4, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22286061" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics ; Base Sequence ; Child ; Chromatin/*genetics/metabolism ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly/*genetics ; DNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Exome/genetics ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Glioblastoma/*genetics ; Histones/*genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Telomere/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4201514/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4201514/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Northcott, Paul A -- Lee, Catherine -- Zichner, Thomas -- Stutz, Adrian M -- Erkek, Serap -- Kawauchi, Daisuke -- Shih, David J H -- Hovestadt, Volker -- Zapatka, Marc -- Sturm, Dominik -- Jones, David T W -- Kool, Marcel -- Remke, Marc -- Cavalli, Florence M G -- Zuyderduyn, Scott -- Bader, Gary D -- VandenBerg, Scott -- Esparza, Lourdes Adriana -- Ryzhova, Marina -- Wang, Wei -- Wittmann, Andrea -- Stark, Sebastian -- Sieber, Laura -- Seker-Cin, Huriye -- Linke, Linda -- Kratochwil, Fabian -- Jager, Natalie -- Buchhalter, Ivo -- Imbusch, Charles D -- Zipprich, Gideon -- Raeder, Benjamin -- Schmidt, Sabine -- Diessl, Nicolle -- Wolf, Stephan -- Wiemann, Stefan -- Brors, Benedikt -- Lawerenz, Chris -- Eils, Jurgen -- Warnatz, Hans-Jorg -- Risch, Thomas -- Yaspo, Marie-Laure -- Weber, Ursula D -- Bartholomae, Cynthia C -- von Kalle, Christof -- Turanyi, Eszter -- Hauser, Peter -- Sanden, Emma -- Darabi, Anna -- Siesjo, Peter -- Sterba, Jaroslav -- Zitterbart, Karel -- Sumerauer, David -- van Sluis, Peter -- Versteeg, Rogier -- Volckmann, Richard -- Koster, Jan -- Schuhmann, Martin U -- Ebinger, Martin -- Grimes, H Leighton -- Robinson, Giles W -- Gajjar, Amar -- Mynarek, Martin -- von Hoff, Katja -- Rutkowski, Stefan -- Pietsch, Torsten -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Felsberg, Jorg -- Reifenberger, Guido -- Kulozik, Andreas E -- von Deimling, Andreas -- Witt, Olaf -- Eils, Roland -- Gilbertson, Richard J -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Taylor, Michael D -- Lichter, Peter -- Korbel, Jan O -- Wechsler-Reya, Robert J -- Pfister, Stefan M -- 5P30CA030199/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA096832/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA030199/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103504/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA159859/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 24;511(7510):428-34. doi: 10.1038/nature13379. Epub 2014 Jun 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2]. ; 1] Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0685, USA [2] Tumor Initiation and Maintenance Program, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3]. ; 1] European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg 69117, Germany [2]. ; European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg 69117, Germany. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg 69117, Germany. ; Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumor Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. ; Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; The Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada. ; Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Tumor Initiation and Maintenance Program, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Neuropathology, NN Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute, 4th Tverskaya-Yamskaya 16, Moscow 125047, Russia. ; Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Data Management Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Department of Vertebrate Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Ihnestrasse 63-73, Berlin 14195, Germany. ; Division of Translational Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 460, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Division of Translational Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 460, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Heidelberg Center for Personalised Oncology (DKFZ-HIPO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University SE, II.sz. Gyermekklinika, Budapest 1094, Hungary. ; 2nd Department of Pediatrics, Semmelweis University, SE, II.sz. Gyermekklinika, Budapest 1094, Hungary. ; 1] Glioma Immunotherapy Group, Division of Neurosurgery, Lund University, Paradisgatan 2, Lund 221 00, Sweden [2] Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Paradisgatan 2, Lund 221 00, Sweden. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology, Masaryk University and University Hospital, Brno, Cernopolni 9 Brno 613 00, Czech Republic. ; Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and University Hospital Motol, V Uvalu 84, Prague 150 06, Czech Republic. ; Department of Oncogenomics, AMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105, AZ Netherlands. ; Department of Neurosurgery, Tubingen University Hospital, Hoppe-Seyler Strasse 3, Tubingen 72076, Germany. ; Division of Immunobiology, Program in Cancer Pathology of the Divisions of Experimental Hematology and Pathology, Program in Hematologic Malignancies of the Cancer and Blood Disease Insitute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 452229, USA. ; 1] Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] Department of Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, Hamburg 20246, Germany. ; Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, Bonn 53105, Germany. ; Cnopf'sche Kinderklinik, Nurnberg Children's Hospital, St-Johannis-Muhlgasse 19, Nurnberg 90419, Germany. ; Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, Dusseldorf 40225, Germany. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology & Immunology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Department of Neuropathology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 220, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Heidelberg Center for Personalised Oncology (DKFZ-HIPO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumor Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada [2] Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. ; 1] Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Heidelberg Center for Personalised Oncology (DKFZ-HIPO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg 69117, Germany [2] EMBL, European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Saffron Walden CB10 1SD, UK. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology & Immunology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg 69120, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043047" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Child ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/*genetics/metabolism ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/*genetics ; Genomic Structural Variation/*genetics ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/classification/*genetics/pathology ; Mice ; Oncogenes/*genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/*genetics/metabolism ; Repressor Proteins/*genetics/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/*genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Keywords: brain ; tumor ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; ALGORITHM ; screening ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; RISK ; HYBRIDIZATION ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; ACTIVATION ; DNA ; MARKER ; IMPACT ; prognosis ; BIOLOGY ; DELETION ; IN-SITU ; AMPLIFICATION ; COMPARATIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION ; NUMBER ; ABERRATIONS ; MARKERS ; ONCOGENE ; beta-catenin ; PROGNOSTIC VALUE ; OUTCOMES ; CHILDREN ; ONCOLOGY ; ADULT ; ADULTS ; CHILDHOOD ; brain tumor ; GENOMIC ABERRATIONS ; DNA COPY NUMBER ; medulloblastoma ; methods ; PROGNOSTIC MARKER ; RISK STRATIFICATION ; LOCI ; MYC ; outcome ; TUMOR BIOLOGY ; Genetic ; NUCLEAR BETA-CATENIN ; clinical oncology ; STRATIFICATION
    Abstract: Purpose Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor in children, whereas it rarely presents in adults. We aimed to identify genetic aberrations in 146 adult MBs to evaluate age-dependent differences in tumor biology and adapt age-specific risk stratification models. Methods As a screening set, we studied a cohort of 34 adult MBs by using array-based comparative genomic hybridization comparing molecular results with clinical data. DNA copy number aberrations identified as possible prognostic markers were validated in an independent cohort of 112 adult patients with MB by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis. Results were compared with the data obtained from 404 pediatric patients with MB. Results CDK6 amplification, 10q loss, and 17q gain are the most powerful prognostic markers in adult MB. Whereas MYC/MYCN oncogene amplifications had a high prognostic value in pediatric MB, these aberrations were rarely observed in adult tumors. Surprisingly, adult MBs with 6q deletion and nuclear beta-catenin activation did not share the excellent prognosis with their pediatric counterparts. Conclusion Adult MB is distinct from pediatric MB in terms of genomic aberrations and their impact on clinical outcomes. Therefore, adult MBs require age-specific risk stratification models. We propose a molecular staging system involving three distinct risk groups based on DNA copy number status of 10q and 17q
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20479417
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  • 5
  • 6
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; TUMORS ; ABERRATIONS ; METHYLATION ; EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS ; MULTIFORME ; HIGH-GRADE GLIOMAS ; TELOMERES ; INTEGRATED GENOMIC ANALYSIS ; ATRX
    Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal brain tumour in adults and children. However, DNA copy number and gene expression signatures indicate differences between adult and paediatric cases(1-4). To explore the genetic events underlying this distinction, we sequenced the exomes of 48 paediatric GBM samples. Somatic mutations in the H3.3-ATRX-DAXX chromatin remodelling pathway were identified in 44% of tumours (21/48). Recurrent mutations in H3F3A, which encodes the replication-independent histone 3 variant H3.3, were observed in 31% of tumours, and led to amino acid substitutions at two critical positions within the histone tail (K27M, G34R/G34V) involved in key regulatory post-translational modifications. Mutations in ATRX (alpha-thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked)(5) and DAXX (death-domain associated protein), encoding two subunits of a chromatin remodelling complex required for H3.3 incorporation at pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres(6,7), were identified in 31% of samples overall, and in 100% of tumours harbouring a G34R or G34V H3.3 mutation. Somatic TP53 mutations were identified in 54% of all cases, and in 86% of samples with H3F3A and/or ATRX mutations. Screening of a large cohort of gliomas of various grades and histologies (n = 784) showed H3F3A mutations to be specific to GBM and highly prevalent in children and young adults. Furthermore, the presence of H3F3A/ATRX-DAXX/TP53 mutations was strongly associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres and specific gene expression profiles. This is, to our knowledge, the first report to highlight recurrent mutations in a regulatory histone in humans, and our data suggest that defects of the chromatin architecture underlie paediatric and young adult GBM pathogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22286061
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  • 7
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; TP53 ; TARGETED THERAPY ; ATRX ; DIPG ; H3.3
    Abstract: Pediatric glioblastomas (GBM) including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) are devastating brain tumors with no effective therapy. Here, we investigated clinical and biological impacts of histone H3.3 mutations. Forty-two DIPGs were tested for H3.3 mutations. Wild-type versus mutated (K27M-H3.3) subgroups were compared for HIST1H3B, IDH, ATRX and TP53 mutations, copy number alterations and clinical outcome. K27M-H3.3 occurred in 71 %, TP53 mutations in 77 % and ATRX mutations in 9 % of DIPGs. ATRX mutations were more frequent in older children (p 〈 0.0001). No G34V/R-H3.3, IDH1/2 or H3.1 mutations were identified. K27M-H3.3 DIPGs showed specific copy number changes, including all gains/amplifications of PDGFRA and MYC/PVT1 loci. Notably, all long-term survivors were H3.3 wild type and this group of patients had better overall survival. K27M-H3.3 mutation defines clinically and biologically distinct subgroups and is prevalent in DIPG, which will impact future therapeutic trial design. K27M- and G34V-H3.3 have location-based incidence (brainstem/cortex) and potentially play distinct roles in pediatric GBM pathogenesis. K27M-H3.3 is universally associated with short survival in DIPG, while patients wild-type for H3.3 show improved survival. Based on prognostic and therapeutic implications, our findings argue for H3.3-mutation testing at diagnosis, which should be rapidly integrated into the clinical decision-making algorithm, particularly in atypical DIPG.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22661320
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; PATHWAY ; GENES ; ACTIVATION ; MUTATIONS ; SUBGROUPS ; LANDSCAPE ; TETRAPLOID TUMOR-CELLS ; TBR1
    Abstract: Medulloblastoma is an aggressively growing tumour, arising in the cerebellum or medulla/brain stem. It is the most common malignant brain tumour in children, and shows tremendous biological and clinical heterogeneity. Despite recent treatment advances, approximately 40% of children experience tumour recurrence, and 30% will die from their disease. Those who survive often have a significantly reduced quality of life. Four tumour subgroups with distinct clinical, biological and genetic profiles are currently identified. WNT tumours, showing activated wingless pathway signalling, carry a favourable prognosis under current treatment regimens. SHH tumours show hedgehog pathway activation, and have an intermediate prognosis. Group 3 and 4 tumours are molecularly less well characterized, and also present the greatest clinical challenges. The full repertoire of genetic events driving this distinction, however, remains unclear. Here we describe an integrative deep-sequencing analysis of 125 tumour-normal pairs, conducted as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) PedBrain Tumor Project. Tetraploidy was identified as a frequent early event in Group 3 and 4 tumours, and a positive correlation between patient age and mutation rate was observed. Several recurrent mutations were identified, both in known medulloblastoma-related genes (CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4) and in genes not previously linked to this tumour (DDX3X, CTDNEP1, KDM6A, TBR1), often in subgroup-specific patterns. RNA sequencing confirmed these alterations, and revealed the expression of what are, to our knowledge, the first medulloblastoma fusion genes identified. Chromatin modifiers were frequently altered across all subgroups. These findings enhance our understanding of the genomic complexity and heterogeneity underlying medulloblastoma, and provide several potential targets for new therapeutics, especially for Group 3 and 4 patients.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22832583
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; DIAGNOSIS ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; MUTATIONS ; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; CHILDREN ; DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION ; NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS ; EARLY-CHILDHOOD MEDULLOBLASTOMA ; POSTOPERATIVE CHEMOTHERAPY
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Neuroectodermal tumors in general demonstrate high and dense expression of the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2). It controls proliferation of both normal and neoplastic cells. sst2 has thus been suggested as a therapeutic target and prognostic marker for certain malignancies. METHODS: To assess global expression patterns of sst 2 mRNA, we evaluated normal (n = 353) and tumor tissues (n = 340) derived from previously published gene expression profiling studies. These analyses demonstrated specific upregulation of sst 2 mRNA in medulloblastoma (p 〈 0.001). sst2 protein was investigated by immunohistochemistry in two independent cohorts. RESULTS: Correlation of sst2 protein expression with clinicopathological variables revealed significantly higher levels in medulloblastoma (p 〈 0.05) compared with CNS-PNET, ependymoma, or pilocytic astrocytoma. The non-SHH medulloblastoma subgroup tumors showed particularly high expression of sst2, when compared to other tumors and normal tissues. Furthermore, we detected a significant survival benefit in children with tumors exhibiting high sst2 expression (p = 0.02) in this screening set. A similar trend was observed in a validation cohort including 240 independent medulloblastoma samples. CONCLUSION: sst2 is highly expressed in medulloblastoma and deserves further evaluation in the setting of prospective trials, given its potential utility as a prognostic marker and a therapeutic target.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23677175
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    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; MELANOMA ; GLIOMAS ; HUMAN CANCER ; telomere length ; ASTROCYTIC TUMORS ; GIANT-CELL GLIOBLASTOMAS ; ATRX ; OCCUR
    Abstract: Hot spot mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have recently been described in several human tumor entities. These mutations result in an upregulation of the telomerase complex activity and thus constitute a relevant mechanism for immortalization of tumor cells. Knowledge of the TERT promoter status in tumors is likely to be of interest for molecular classification and as a potential target for therapy. We, therefore, performed a systematic analysis of TERT promoter mutations in 1,515 tumors of the human nervous system and its coverings including 373 pediatric and 1,142 adult patients. We detected a total of 327 mutations. TERT promoter mutations were exceedingly rare in tumors typically encountered in pediatric patients. In entities typically encountered in adult patients TERT promoter mutations were strongly associated with older age (p 〈 0.0001). Highest mutation frequencies were detected in gliosarcomas (81 %), oligodendrogliomas (78 %), oligoastrocytomas (58 %), primary glioblastomas (54 %), and solitary fibrous tumors (50 %). Related to other molecular alterations, TERT promoter mutations were strongly associated with 1p/19q loss (p 〈 0.0001), but inversely associated with loss of ATRX expression (p 〈 0.0001) and IDH1/IDH2 mutations (p 〈 0.0001). TERT promoter mutations are typically found in adult patients and occur in a highly tumor type-associated distribution.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24154961
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