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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-04-13
    Description: Primary triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), a tumour type defined by lack of oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and ERBB2 gene amplification, represent approximately 16% of all breast cancers. Here we show in 104 TNBC cases that at the time of diagnosis these cancers exhibit a wide and continuous spectrum of genomic evolution, with some having only a handful of coding somatic aberrations in a few pathways, whereas others contain hundreds of coding somatic mutations. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) revealed that only approximately 36% of mutations are expressed. Using deep re-sequencing measurements of allelic abundance for 2,414 somatic mutations, we determine for the first time-to our knowledge-in an epithelial tumour subtype, the relative abundance of clonal frequencies among cases representative of the population. We show that TNBCs vary widely in their clonal frequencies at the time of diagnosis, with the basal subtype of TNBC showing more variation than non-basal TNBC. Although p53 (also known as TP53), PIK3CA and PTEN somatic mutations seem to be clonally dominant compared to other genes, in some tumours their clonal frequencies are incompatible with founder status. Mutations in cytoskeletal, cell shape and motility proteins occurred at lower clonal frequencies, suggesting that they occurred later during tumour progression. Taken together, our results show that understanding the biology and therapeutic responses of patients with TNBC will require the determination of individual tumour clonal genotypes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863681/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863681/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Shah, Sohrab P -- Roth, Andrew -- Goya, Rodrigo -- Oloumi, Arusha -- Ha, Gavin -- Zhao, Yongjun -- Turashvili, Gulisa -- Ding, Jiarui -- Tse, Kane -- Haffari, Gholamreza -- Bashashati, Ali -- Prentice, Leah M -- Khattra, Jaswinder -- Burleigh, Angela -- Yap, Damian -- Bernard, Virginie -- McPherson, Andrew -- Shumansky, Karey -- Crisan, Anamaria -- Giuliany, Ryan -- Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza -- Rosner, Jamie -- Lai, Daniel -- Birol, Inanc -- Varhol, Richard -- Tam, Angela -- Dhalla, Noreen -- Zeng, Thomas -- Ma, Kevin -- Chan, Simon K -- Griffith, Malachi -- Moradian, Annie -- Cheng, S-W Grace -- Morin, Gregg B -- Watson, Peter -- Gelmon, Karen -- Chia, Stephen -- Chin, Suet-Feung -- Curtis, Christina -- Rueda, Oscar M -- Pharoah, Paul D -- Damaraju, Sambasivarao -- Mackey, John -- Hoon, Kelly -- Harkins, Timothy -- Tadigotla, Vasisht -- Sigaroudinia, Mahvash -- Gascard, Philippe -- Tlsty, Thea -- Costello, Joseph F -- Meyer, Irmtraud M -- Eaves, Connie J -- Wasserman, Wyeth W -- Jones, Steven -- Huntsman, David -- Hirst, Martin -- Caldas, Carlos -- Marra, Marco A -- Aparicio, Samuel -- 5U01ES017154-02/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084875/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM084875/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 4;486(7403):395-9. doi: 10.1038/nature10933.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. sshah@bccrc.ca〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495314" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis/*genetics/*pathology ; Clone Cells/metabolism/pathology ; DNA Copy Number Variations/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Disease Progression ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Genotype ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Humans ; INDEL Mutation/genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Point Mutation/genetics ; Precision Medicine ; Reproducibility of Results ; Sequence Analysis, RNA
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-12-04
    Description: Human cancers, including breast cancers, comprise clones differing in mutation content. Clones evolve dynamically in space and time following principles of Darwinian evolution, underpinning important emergent features such as drug resistance and metastasis. Human breast cancer xenoengraftment is used as a means of capturing and studying tumour biology, and breast tumour xenografts are generally assumed to be reasonable models of the originating tumours. However, the consequences and reproducibility of engraftment and propagation on the genomic clonal architecture of tumours have not been systematically examined at single-cell resolution. Here we show, using deep-genome and single-cell sequencing methods, the clonal dynamics of initial engraftment and subsequent serial propagation of primary and metastatic human breast cancers in immunodeficient mice. In all 15 cases examined, clonal selection on engraftment was observed in both primary and metastatic breast tumours, varying in degree from extreme selective engraftment of minor (〈5% of starting population) clones to moderate, polyclonal engraftment. Furthermore, ongoing clonal dynamics during serial passaging is a feature of tumours experiencing modest initial selection. Through single-cell sequencing, we show that major mutation clusters estimated from tumour population sequencing relate predictably to the most abundant clonal genotypes, even in clonally complex and rapidly evolving cases. Finally, we show that similar clonal expansion patterns can emerge in independent grafts of the same starting tumour population, indicating that genomic aberrations can be reproducible determinants of evolutionary trajectories. Our results show that measurement of genomically defined clonal population dynamics will be highly informative for functional studies using patient-derived breast cancer xenoengraftment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Eirew, Peter -- Steif, Adi -- Khattra, Jaswinder -- Ha, Gavin -- Yap, Damian -- Farahani, Hossein -- Gelmon, Karen -- Chia, Stephen -- Mar, Colin -- Wan, Adrian -- Laks, Emma -- Biele, Justina -- Shumansky, Karey -- Rosner, Jamie -- McPherson, Andrew -- Nielsen, Cydney -- Roth, Andrew J L -- Lefebvre, Calvin -- Bashashati, Ali -- de Souza, Camila -- Siu, Celia -- Aniba, Radhouane -- Brimhall, Jazmine -- Oloumi, Arusha -- Osako, Tomo -- Bruna, Alejandra -- Sandoval, Jose L -- Algara, Teresa -- Greenwood, Wendy -- Leung, Kaston -- Cheng, Hongwei -- Xue, Hui -- Wang, Yuzhuo -- Lin, Dong -- Mungall, Andrew J -- Moore, Richard -- Zhao, Yongjun -- Lorette, Julie -- Nguyen, Long -- Huntsman, David -- Eaves, Connie J -- Hansen, Carl -- Marra, Marco A -- Caldas, Carlos -- Shah, Sohrab P -- Aparicio, Samuel -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):422-6. doi: 10.1038/nature13952. Epub 2014 Nov 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. ; Department of Medical Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada. ; Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2XZ, UK [2] Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute, University of Cambridge, Li Ka Shing Centre, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. ; 1] Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada [2] Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1, Canada. ; 1] Department of Experimental Therapeutics, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver General Hospital and Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1M9, Canada. ; Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada. ; 1] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada [2] Terry Fox Laboratory, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada [2] Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada. ; 1] Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada [3] Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada [3] Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [4] Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25470049" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology/secondary ; Clone Cells/*metabolism/*pathology ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Genotype ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Humans ; Mice ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; *Single-Cell Analysis ; Time Factors ; Transplantation, Heterologous ; *Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays/methods
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Keywords: ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA ; STEM-CELLS ; EXPRESSION PATTERNS ; B-CELL LYMPHOMAS ; NON-HODGKIN-LYMPHOMA ; SOMATIC MUTATIONS ; INACTIVATING MUTATIONS ; HISTONE METHYLTRANSFERASE EZH2 ; REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 ; GROUP PROTEINS
    Abstract: The histone methyltransferase EZH2 is frequently mutated in germinal center-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. To further characterize these EZH2 mutations in lymphomagenesis, we generated a mouse line where EZH2(Y641F) is expressed from a lymphocyte-specific promoter. Spleen cells isolated from the transgenic mice displayed a global increase in trimethylated H3K27, but the mice did not show an increased tendency to develop lymphoma. As EZH2 mutations often coincide with other mutations in lymphoma, we combined the expression of EZH2(Y641F) by crossing these transgenic mice with Emicro-Myc transgenic mice. We observed a dramatic acceleration of lymphoma development in this combination model of Myc and EZH2(Y641F). The lymphomas show histologic features of high-grade disease with a shift toward a more mature B-cell phenotype, increased cycling and gene expression, and epigenetic changes involving important pathways in B-cell regulation and function. Furthermore, they initiate disease in secondary recipients. In summary, EZH2(Y641F) can collaborate with Myc to accelerate lymphomagenesis demonstrating a cooperative role of EZH2 mutations in oncogenesis. This murine lymphoma model provides a new tool to study global changes in the epigenome caused by this frequent mutation and a promising model system for testing novel treatments.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24802772
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  • 4
  • 5
    ISSN: 1573-1472
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Notes: Abstract Direct measurements of sensible heat fluxes were conducted over a grass surface at Ladner, British Columbia, using yaw-sphere-thermometer eddy-correlation systems. The results show that for half-hour averaging periods, there is no phase-lag between sensible heat and net radiation flux densities. Field comparison of two yaw-sphere-thermometer systems gave good and consistent agreement. At a height of 2 m above ground and a horizontal crosswind separation of 1.5 m, less than 5% variability was noted in the measured heat fluxes. For a 19-m horizontal separation, the variability was less than 20%. The aridity index (α) advanced by Priestley and Taylor (1972), is shown to be a potentially useful climatic indicator.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Woodbury, NY : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Applied Physics Letters 53 (1988), S. 1260-1262 
    ISSN: 1077-3118
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Concurrent fabrication of InGaAsP/InP buried-heterostructure laser stripes and mirrors has been demonstrated by the use of dry etching and mass transport. In comparison to previous processes in which the laser stripes and mirrors are fabricated separately, this process offers the advantages of simplicity, built-in alignment, and improved control of device dimensions. Lasers with a cylindrical and a flat end mirror have threshold currents as low as 22 mA and differential quantum efficiencies as high as 24% per facet. Beam divergences as narrow as 13° are obtained for the cylindrical mirrors.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Woodbury, NY : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Applied Physics Letters 52 (1988), S. 1464-1466 
    ISSN: 1077-3118
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Ion-beam-assisted etching has been used to fabricate mass-transported InGaAsP/InP buried- heterostructure lasers. These lasers have a novel, deeply etched rectangular mesa that results in reduced current leakage. Both single-stripe lasers and Y-junction-coupled multiple-stripe laser arrays have been demonstrated. The single-stripe lasers have 12 mA cw threshold currents, differential quantum efficiencies of 32%–34% per facet, and smooth single-lobe far-field patterns. The multiple-stripe arrays lase in-phase with strong phase coherence.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Woodbury, NY : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Applied Physics Letters 54 (1989), S. 687-689 
    ISSN: 1077-3118
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Diffraction-coupled arrays of InGaAsP/InP buried-heterostructure lasers are reported. These arrays, fabricated by ion beam assisted etching and mass transport, have a novel scalloped mirror at the end of the coupling section that greatly increases the coupling between stripes and reduces the feedback into the same stripe. Far-field patterns show sharply defined lobes that are as narrow as 3°. An output section with cylindrical mirrors has been incorporated into the arrays to increase the power in the central far-field lobe. Threshold currents as low as 150 mA have been obtained for eight-stripe arrays.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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