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  • 1
    ISSN: 1600-0668
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Medicine
    Notes: To test the reproducibility of a questionnaire previously used to study the association between respiratory symptoms and home dampness/mold, it was sent to the parents of 1,596 children twice, with an interval of one month between distributions. A total of 770 respondents completed the questionnaire both times and were entered into an analysis. For exposure variables, percentages of agreement between the two administrations ranged from 87% for visible mold growth in the home to 95% for basement flooding. Respective kappa scores ranged from 73% to 82%. Percentage agreements for the adults' symptoms variables ranged from 80% for upper respiratory symptoms, to 99% for physician-diagnosed asthma. Percentage agreements for children's symptoms ranged from 81% for upper respiratory symptoms to 97% for current asthma. For all symptoms kappas ranged from 59% to 90% indicating moderate to high reproducibility. Future research should now concentrate on validating the questionnaire as an indicator of mold growth.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Indoor air 8 (1998), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0668
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Fifty-nine houses in the small Canadian community of Wallaceburg, 39 with high levels of biologically active contaminants and 20 with low levels, were subjected to detailed field inspections: testing to determine house-operating parameters; monitoring of indoor environmental conditions; and simulating to predict the condensation formation potential under winter conditions. It was found that low air leakage and natural ventilation were not associated with higher levels of mold growth, as measured by ergosterol concentrations and airborne viable particulates. Analyses showed that moisture sources in the houses were a more significant factor in mold levels and dust mite antigen levels than relative humidity. Mold areas visible during inspection were not a good predictor of ergosterol concentrations in dust, indicating that much of the mold growth was in hidden locations.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1573-0832
    Keywords: aerobiology ; air pollution ; bioaerosols ; epidemiology ; fungus ; health ; indoor
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Questionnaire surveys in several countries have consistently detected an association between symptoms and residential mould growth. Confirmation by objective measures would strengthen the argument for causality. To address this issue, quantitative and qualitative fungal measures (airborne ergosterol and viable fungi in dust) were compared to respiratory symptoms (n = 403) and nocturnal cough recordings (n = 145) in Canadian elementary schoolchildren during the winter of 1993–1994. There was a 25 percent to 50 percent relative increase in symptom prevalence when mould was reported to be present (p 〈 0.05). However, neither symptoms nor recorded cough was related to objective measures of mould. In conclusion, the inability to find an association between objective measures of fungus and health suggest that either these objective measures, or the traditionally used questionnaire data are inaccurate. This discrepancy limits the acceptance of a causal relation between indoor fungal growth and illness.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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