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  • 1
    ISSN: 1365-2044
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: From a prospectively defined cohort of patients who underwent either general, regional or combined anaesthesia from 1 January 1995 to 1 January 1997 (n = 869 483), all consecutive patients (n = 811) who died within 24 h or remained unintentionally comatose 24 h after anaesthesia were classified to determine a relationship with anaesthesia. These deaths (n = 119; 15%) were further analysed to identify contributing aspects of the anaesthetic management, other factors and the appropriateness of care. The incidence of 24-h peri-operative death per 10 000 anaesthetics was 8.8 (95% CI 8.2–9.5), of peri-operative coma was 0.5 (0.3–0.6) and of anaesthesia-related death 1.4 (1.1–1.6). Of the 119 anaesthesia-related deaths, 62 (52%) were associated with cardiovascular management, 57 (48%) with other anaesthetic management, 12 (10%) with ventilatory management and 12 (10%) with patient monitoring. Inadequate preparation of the patient contributed to 30 (25%) of the anaesthesia-related deaths. During induction of anaesthesia, choice of anaesthetic technique (n = 18 (15%)) and performance of the anaesthesiologist (n = 8 (7%)) were most commonly associated with death. During maintenance, the most common factors were cardiovascular management (n = 43 (36%)), ventilatory management (n = 12 (10%)) and patient monitoring (n = 12 (10%)). In both the recovery and the postoperative phases, patient monitoring was the most common factor (n = 12 (10%) for both). For cardiovascular, ventilatory and other anaesthetic management, human failure contributed to 89 (75%) deaths and organisational factors to 12 (10%). For inadequate patient monitoring, human factors contributed to 71 (60%) deaths and organisational factors to 48 (40%). Other contributing factors were inadequate communication (30 deaths (25%) for all four aspects of the anaesthetic management) and lack of supervision (particularly for ventilatory management). Inadequate care was delivered in 19 (16%) of the anaesthesia-related deaths with respect to cardiovascular management, in 20 (17%) with respect to ventilatory management, in 18 (15%) with respect to patient monitoring and in 23 (19%) with respect to other anaesthetic management.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    Anaesthesia 52 (1997), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-2044
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: In this noninterventional study, the implementation of ‘modern’ pain management in clinical practice was investigated by recording the regular prescription, administration and efficacy of analgesic drugs. This resulted in a reproducible and superficial quality control design for hospitals. One hundred and fifty surgical patients were followed during 5 days postoperatively. For every patient, pain, mood and sedation were measured using visual analogue and verbal descriptive scores; the prescription of analgesics at set times and administered doses of analgesics were also recorded. Only paracodeine and naproxen were administered regularly as prescribed, unlike paracetamol and morphine. The prescribed daily dose of morphine was only received by 4.2% of all patients. Although the postoperative pain treatment pathway was considered to be improved after better education and communication, in fact the opposite was found. This is probably caused by traditional thinking, lack of control and time pressure on the hospital staff and the subservient attitude of the patient.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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