Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Indoor air 4 (1994), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0668
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Medicine
    Notes: A health and housing questionnaire was administered to children, ages 9-11, living in 24 communities in the United States and Canada. Logistic regression analysis examined the relationship between respiratory health symptoms (bronchitic, asthmatic and lower respiratory) and housing factors. The health risks (expressed as relative odds) were controlled for gender, parental asthma, parental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and parental education, as well as between-city differences. Lower respiratory symptoms had significantly higher odds ratios reported in older homes (1.12), homes with smokers (1.24), air conditioners (1.14), air cleaners (1.37), and humidifiers (1.47). Home dampness (1.48) and the individual mold and water variables were all significantly associated with increased symptoms. Similar results were reported for bronchitic and asthmatic symptoms. While air conditioners and air cleaners were confounded with symptoms, humidifiers remained significant after controlling for childhood atopy.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: Environmental tobacco smoke ; lung cancer ; smoking
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Epidemiologic evidence on the relation between environmental tobacco smoke and cancer is reviewed. The labeling of tobacco smoke as an environmental cause of lung cancer has been challenged based on allegations of bias in the epidemiologic data. However, tobacco smoke has been shown to increase the risk of lung cancer down to the lowest exposure levels. Environmental tobacco smoke contains the same carcinogenic compounds as those found in the tobacco smoke inhaled directly by the smoker. Nonsmokers environmentally exposed have elevated levels of tobacco smoke byproducts in biological samples. These observations alone are sufficient to identify tobacco smoke as an environmental carcinogen. The epidemiologic studies showing that environmental exposure to tobacco smoke is associated weakly but consistently with increased risk of lung cancer. While these epidemiologic studies have been challenged, it does not appear that the observed epidemiologic associations are due to misclassification or confounding. Indeed, the epidemiologic results, particularly among the studies with superior data collection methods and better control of bias and confounding, find consistent associations between environmental tobacco smoke and lung cancer. This paper summarizes the evidence that environmental exposure to tobacco smoke increases the risk of lung cancer, and considers the criticisms of the epidemiologic evidence which have been raised.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1520-5851
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...