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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-10-06
    Description: Top-down prefrontal cortex inputs to the hippocampus have been hypothesized to be important in memory consolidation, retrieval, and the pathophysiology of major psychiatric diseases; however, no such direct projections have been identified and functionally described. Here we report the discovery of a monosynaptic prefrontal cortex (predominantly anterior cingulate) to hippocampus (CA3 to CA1 region) projection in mice, and find that optogenetic manipulation of this projection (here termed AC-CA) is capable of eliciting contextual memory retrieval. To explore the network mechanisms of this process, we developed and applied tools to observe cellular-resolution neural activity in the hippocampus while stimulating AC-CA projections during memory retrieval in mice behaving in virtual-reality environments. Using this approach, we found that learning drives the emergence of a sparse class of neurons in CA2/CA3 that are highly correlated with the local network and that lead synchronous population activity events; these neurons are then preferentially recruited by the AC-CA projection during memory retrieval. These findings reveal a sparsely implemented memory retrieval mechanism in the hippocampus that operates via direct top-down prefrontal input, with implications for the patterning and storage of salient memory representations.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada -- Sankaran, Sethuraman -- Marshel, James H -- Kim, Christina K -- Ferenczi, Emily -- Lee, Soo Yeun -- Berndt, Andre -- Ramakrishnan, Charu -- Jaffe, Anna -- Lo, Maisie -- Liston, Conor -- Deisseroth, Karl -- R00 MH097822/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Oct 29;526(7575):653-9. doi: 10.1038/nature15389. Epub 2015 Oct 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; CNC Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Neuroscience Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26436451" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-11-05
    Description: Anxiety-related conditions are among the most difficult neuropsychiatric diseases to treat pharmacologically, but respond to cognitive therapies. There has therefore been interest in identifying relevant top-down pathways from cognitive control regions in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Identification of such pathways could contribute to our understanding of the cognitive regulation of affect, and provide pathways for intervention. Previous studies have suggested that dorsal and ventral mPFC subregions exert opposing effects on fear, as do subregions of other structures. However, precise causal targets for top-down connections among these diverse possibilities have not been established. Here we show that the basomedial amygdala (BMA) represents the major target of ventral mPFC in amygdala in mice. Moreover, BMA neurons differentiate safe and aversive environments, and BMA activation decreases fear-related freezing and high-anxiety states. Lastly, we show that the ventral mPFC-BMA projection implements top-down control of anxiety state and learned freezing, both at baseline and in stress-induced anxiety, defining a broadly relevant new top-down behavioural regulation pathway.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Adhikari, Avishek -- Lerner, Talia N -- Finkelstein, Joel -- Pak, Sally -- Jennings, Joshua H -- Davidson, Thomas J -- Ferenczi, Emily -- Gunaydin, Lisa A -- Mirzabekov, Julie J -- Ye, Li -- Kim, Sung-Yon -- Lei, Anna -- Deisseroth, Karl -- 1F32MH105053-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- K99 MH106649/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- K99MH106649/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 12;527(7577):179-85. doi: 10.1038/nature15698. Epub 2015 Nov 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; CNC Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94304, USA. ; Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26536109" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/cytology/*physiology ; Animals ; Anxiety/*physiopathology/psychology ; Extinction, Psychological/physiology ; Fear/*physiology/psychology ; Female ; Freezing Reaction, Cataleptic/physiology ; Learning/physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Neural Pathways/*physiology ; Prefrontal Cortex/cytology/physiology ; Stress, Psychological/physiopathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
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