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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-08-02
    Description: The mammalian intestine is colonized by beneficial commensal bacteria and is a site of infection by pathogens, including helminth parasites. Helminths induce potent immunomodulatory effects, but whether these effects are mediated by direct regulation of host immunity or indirectly through eliciting changes in the microbiota is unknown. We tested this in the context of virus-helminth coinfection. Helminth coinfection resulted in impaired antiviral immunity and was associated with changes in the microbiota and STAT6-dependent helminth-induced alternative activation of macrophages. Notably, helminth-induced impairment of antiviral immunity was evident in germ-free mice, but neutralization of Ym1, a chitinase-like molecule that is associated with alternatively activated macrophages, could partially restore antiviral immunity. These data indicate that helminth-induced immunomodulation occurs independently of changes in the microbiota but is dependent on Ym1.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4548887/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4548887/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Osborne, Lisa C -- Monticelli, Laurel A -- Nice, Timothy J -- Sutherland, Tara E -- Siracusa, Mark C -- Hepworth, Matthew R -- Tomov, Vesselin T -- Kobuley, Dmytro -- Tran, Sara V -- Bittinger, Kyle -- Bailey, Aubrey G -- Laughlin, Alice L -- Boucher, Jean-Luc -- Wherry, E John -- Bushman, Frederic D -- Allen, Judith E -- Virgin, Herbert W -- Artis, David -- 095831/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 2-P30 CA016520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5T32A100716334/PHS HHS/ -- AI061570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI074878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI082630/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI083022/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI087990/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095466/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI097333/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI102942/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI106697/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F32 AI085828/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F32-AI085828/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- HHSN272201300006C/PHS HHS/ -- K08 DK097301/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08-DK097301/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- MR/J001929/1/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P01 AI106697/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30-AI045008/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30-DK050306/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI 084887/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI061570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI074878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI095466/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI097333/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI102942/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI087990/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32-AI007532/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Aug 1;345(6196):578-82. doi: 10.1126/science.1256942. Epub 2014 Jul 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK. ; Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Laboratoire de Chimie et Biochimie Pharmacologiques et Toxicologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris, France. ; Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. dartis@mail.med.upenn.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25082704" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Caliciviridae Infections/*immunology ; Coinfection/*immunology/microbiology/parasitology ; Gastroenteritis/*immunology/virology ; Germ-Free Life ; *Immunomodulation ; Intestines/immunology/microbiology/virology ; Lectins/*immunology ; Macrophage Activation ; Macrophages/immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Microbiota/*immunology ; Norovirus/*immunology ; Trichinella/*immunology ; Trichinellosis/*immunology ; beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidases/*immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-01-17
    Description: CD4 T cells promote innate and adaptive immune responses, but how vaccine-elicited CD4 T cells contribute to immune protection remains unclear. We evaluated whether induction of virus-specific CD4 T cells by vaccination would protect mice against infection with chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Immunization with vaccines that selectively induced CD4 T cell responses resulted in catastrophic inflammation and mortality after challenge with a persistent strain of LCMV. Immunopathology required antigen-specific CD4 T cells and was associated with a cytokine storm, generalized inflammation, and multi-organ system failure. Virus-specific CD8 T cells or antibodies abrogated the pathology. These data demonstrate that vaccine-elicited CD4 T cells in the absence of effective antiviral immune responses can trigger lethal immunopathology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4382081/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4382081/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo -- Barber, Daniel L -- Wherry, E John -- Provine, Nicholas M -- Teigler, Jeffrey E -- Parenteau, Lily -- Blackmore, Stephen -- Borducchi, Erica N -- Larocca, Rafael A -- Yates, Kathleen B -- Shen, Hao -- Haining, W Nicholas -- Sommerstein, Rami -- Pinschewer, Daniel D -- Ahmed, Rafi -- Barouch, Dan H -- AI007245/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI030048/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI07387/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI078526/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI096040/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P51 OD011132/OD/NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007245/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI078526/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI096040/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 16;347(6219):278-82. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa2148.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. ; Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Vaccine Immunology, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Vaccine Immunology, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Department of Biomedicine-Haus Petersplatz, Division of Experimental Virology, University of Basel, 4009 Basel, Switzerland. ; Emory Vaccine Center and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA. dbarouch@bidmc.harvard.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25593185" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptive Immunity ; Animals ; Antibodies, Viral/immunology ; Antigens, Viral/immunology ; Arenaviridae Infections/*immunology/virology ; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Cytokines/blood ; Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology ; Immune System Diseases/*etiology/immunology/pathology ; Immunologic Memory ; Inflammation/*etiology/immunology/pathology ; Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus/*immunology/physiology ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Multiple Organ Failure/etiology ; Vaccination ; Viral Load ; Viral Vaccines/*adverse effects/*immunology ; Virus Replication
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-08-16
    Description: CD4(+) T-helper type 2 (T(H)2) cells, characterized by their expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13, are required for immunity to helminth parasites and promote the pathological inflammation associated with asthma and allergic diseases. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding the cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) are associated with the development of multiple allergic disorders in humans, indicating that TSLP is a critical regulator of T(H)2 cytokine-associated inflammatory diseases. In support of genetic analyses, exaggerated TSLP production is associated with asthma, atopic dermatitis and food allergies in patients, and studies in murine systems demonstrated that TSLP promotes T(H)2 cytokine-mediated immunity and inflammation. However, the mechanisms through which TSLP induces T(H)2 cytokine responses remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that TSLP promotes systemic basophilia, that disruption of TSLP-TSLPR interactions results in defective basophil responses, and that TSLPR-sufficient basophils can restore T(H)2-cell-dependent immunity in vivo. TSLP acted directly on bone-marrow-resident progenitors to promote basophil responses selectively. Critically, TSLP could elicit basophil responses in both IL-3-IL-3R-sufficient and -deficient environments, and genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses identified heterogeneity between TSLP-elicited versus IL-3-elicited basophils. Furthermore, activated human basophils expressed TSLPR, and basophils isolated from eosinophilic oesophagitis patients were distinct from classical basophils. Collectively, these studies identify previously unrecognized heterogeneity within the basophil cell lineage and indicate that expression of TSLP may influence susceptibility to multiple allergic diseases by regulating basophil haematopoiesis and eliciting a population of functionally distinct basophils that promote T(H)2 cytokine-mediated inflammation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3263308/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3263308/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Siracusa, Mark C -- Saenz, Steven A -- Hill, David A -- Kim, Brian S -- Headley, Mark B -- Doering, Travis A -- Wherry, E John -- Jessup, Heidi K -- Siegel, Lori A -- Kambayashi, Taku -- Dudek, Emily C -- Kubo, Masato -- Cianferoni, Antonella -- Spergel, Jonathan M -- Ziegler, Steven F -- Comeau, Michael R -- Artis, David -- AI083480/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI61570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI74878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI87990/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F31 GM082187/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- F32 AI085828/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI061570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI061570-09/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI074878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI074878-05/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI095466/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI095466-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL107589/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI083480/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI083480-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI060516/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI095608-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Aug 14;477(7363):229-33. doi: 10.1038/nature10329.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21841801" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Asthma/immunology ; Basophils/*cytology/metabolism ; Cytokines/genetics/immunology/*metabolism ; Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology ; Food Hypersensitivity/immunology ; *Hematopoiesis ; Humans ; Hypersensitivity, Immediate/*immunology ; Inflammation/*immunology/*metabolism ; *Interleukin-3/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Phenotype ; Receptors, Cytokine/metabolism ; Receptors, Interleukin-3/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Th2 Cells/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-05-24
    Description: Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-gammat-positive (RORgammat(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORgammat(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORgammat(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal bacteria.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3699860/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3699860/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hepworth, Matthew R -- Monticelli, Laurel A -- Fung, Thomas C -- Ziegler, Carly G K -- Grunberg, Stephanie -- Sinha, Rohini -- Mantegazza, Adriana R -- Ma, Hak-Ling -- Crawford, Alison -- Angelosanto, Jill M -- Wherry, E John -- Koni, Pandelakis A -- Bushman, Frederic D -- Elson, Charles O -- Eberl, Gerard -- Artis, David -- Sonnenberg, Gregory F -- 2-P30 CA016520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- AI061570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI074878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI087990/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095466/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095776/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI097333/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI102942/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DK071176/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DP5 OD012116/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP5OD012116/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P01 DK071176/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK050306/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30DK50306/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI061570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI074878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI095466/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI097333/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI102942/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI083480/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI087990/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007532/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI055428/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32-AI055428/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jun 6;498(7452):113-7. doi: 10.1038/nature12240. Epub 2013 May 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23698371" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigen Presentation/immunology ; Bacteria/*immunology ; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology/*immunology/pathology ; Cell Proliferation ; Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology/metabolism ; Humans ; Immunity, Innate/*immunology ; Inflammation/pathology ; Interleukin-17/metabolism ; Interleukin-23/metabolism ; Interleukins/metabolism ; Intestines/*immunology/*microbiology/pathology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Transgenic ; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3/metabolism ; *Symbiosis
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-03-11
    Description: Immune checkpoint inhibitors result in impressive clinical responses, but optimal results will require combination with each other and other therapies. This raises fundamental questions about mechanisms of non-redundancy and resistance. Here we report major tumour regressions in a subset of patients with metastatic melanoma treated with an anti-CTLA4 antibody (anti-CTLA4) and radiation, and reproduced this effect in mouse models. Although combined treatment improved responses in irradiated and unirradiated tumours, resistance was common. Unbiased analyses of mice revealed that resistance was due to upregulation of PD-L1 on melanoma cells and associated with T-cell exhaustion. Accordingly, optimal response in melanoma and other cancer types requires radiation, anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD-L1/PD-1. Anti-CTLA4 predominantly inhibits T-regulatory cells (Treg cells), thereby increasing the CD8 T-cell to Treg (CD8/Treg) ratio. Radiation enhances the diversity of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of intratumoral T cells. Together, anti-CTLA4 promotes expansion of T cells, while radiation shapes the TCR repertoire of the expanded peripheral clones. Addition of PD-L1 blockade reverses T-cell exhaustion to mitigate depression in the CD8/Treg ratio and further encourages oligoclonal T-cell expansion. Similarly to results from mice, patients on our clinical trial with melanoma showing high PD-L1 did not respond to radiation plus anti-CTLA4, demonstrated persistent T-cell exhaustion, and rapidly progressed. Thus, PD-L1 on melanoma cells allows tumours to escape anti-CTLA4-based therapy, and the combination of radiation, anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD-L1 promotes response and immunity through distinct mechanisms.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4401634/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4401634/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Twyman-Saint Victor, Christina -- Rech, Andrew J -- Maity, Amit -- Rengan, Ramesh -- Pauken, Kristen E -- Stelekati, Erietta -- Benci, Joseph L -- Xu, Bihui -- Dada, Hannah -- Odorizzi, Pamela M -- Herati, Ramin S -- Mansfield, Kathleen D -- Patsch, Dana -- Amaravadi, Ravi K -- Schuchter, Lynn M -- Ishwaran, Hemant -- Mick, Rosemarie -- Pryma, Daniel A -- Xu, Xiaowei -- Feldman, Michael D -- Gangadhar, Tara C -- Hahn, Stephen M -- Wherry, E John -- Vonderheide, Robert H -- Minn, Andy J -- KL2TR000139/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- P01AI112521/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30CA016520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA174523/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50CA174523/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI105343/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA158186/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA163739/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01AI105343/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01CA158186/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA163739/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA172651/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32DK007066/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U01AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI082630/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19AI082630/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UL1RR024134/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 16;520(7547):373-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14292. Epub 2015 Mar 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 33136, USA. ; 1] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [3] Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [3] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [4] Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; 1] Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [3] Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [4] Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25754329" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, CD274/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; CTLA-4 Antigen/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Cell Cycle Checkpoints/*drug effects ; Female ; Humans ; Melanoma/*drug therapy/*immunology/pathology/*radiotherapy ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/drug effects/immunology/metabolism ; T-Lymphocytes/cytology/*drug effects/immunology/*radiation effects ; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/drug effects/immunology/radiation effects
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-12-01
    Description: Chronic infections strain the regenerative capacity of antiviral T lymphocyte populations, leading to failure in long-term immunity. The cellular and molecular events controlling this regenerative capacity, however, are unknown. We found that two distinct states of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells exist in chronically infected mice and humans. Differential expression of the T-box transcription factors T-bet and Eomesodermin (Eomes) facilitated the cooperative maintenance of the pool of antiviral CD8(+) T cells during chronic viral infection. T-bet(hi) cells displayed low intrinsic turnover but proliferated in response to persisting antigen, giving rise to Eomes(hi) terminal progeny. Genetic elimination of either subset resulted in failure to control chronic infection, which suggests that an imbalance in differentiation and renewal could underlie the collapse of immunity in humans with chronic infections.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3653769/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3653769/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Paley, Michael A -- Kroy, Daniela C -- Odorizzi, Pamela M -- Johnnidis, Jonathan B -- Dolfi, Douglas V -- Barnett, Burton E -- Bikoff, Elizabeth K -- Robertson, Elizabeth J -- Lauer, Georg M -- Reiner, Steven L -- Wherry, E John -- 059312/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- AI061699/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI0663445/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI076458/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI078897/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI082630/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI083022/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- HHSN266200500030C/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- HHSN266200500030C/PHS HHS/ -- P01 AI078897/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK043351/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI042370/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI061699/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI076458/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007632/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32-AI-07324/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI082630/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI083022/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Nov 30;338(6111):1220-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1229620.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Microbiology and Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23197535" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Hepatitis B, Chronic/*immunology ; Humans ; Liver/virology ; Lymphocyte Activation ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Stem Cells/immunology ; T-Box Domain Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; T-Lymphocyte Subsets/*immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2013-04-13
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Odorizzi, Pamela M -- Wherry, E John -- T32 AI007632/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Apr 12;340(6129):155-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1237568.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Immunology and Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23580520" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arenaviridae Infections/*immunology/*virology ; Female ; Interferon Type I/*immunology/*metabolism ; Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus/*immunology/*physiology ; Male ; *Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-06-05
    Description: T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells are a population of CD4 + T cells that express regulatory T cell markers and have been shown to suppress humoral immunity. However, the precise mechanisms and location of Tfr-mediated suppression in the lymph node (LN) microenvironment are unknown. Using highly multiplexed quantitative imaging and functional assays, we examined the spatial distribution, suppressive function, and preferred interacting partners of Tfr cells in human mesenteric LNs. We find that the majority of Tfr cells express low levels of PD-1 and reside at the border between the T cell zone and B cell follicle, with very few found in the germinal centers (GCs). Although PD-1 + Tfr cells expressed higher levels of CD38, CTLA-4, and GARP than PD-1 Neg Tfr cells, both potently suppressed antibody production in vitro. These findings highlight the phenotypic diversity of human Tfr cells and suggest that Tfr-mediated suppression is most efficient at the T-B border and within the follicle, not in the GC.
    Keywords: Infectious Disease and Host Defense
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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