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  • 1
    Keywords: Medicine ; Pharmacology ; Biomedicine ; Pharmacology/Toxicology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Evaluating Nanomedicines: Obstacles and Advancements -- Detection of Bacterial Contamination in Nanoparticle Formulations by Agar Plate Test -- Considerations and Some Practical Solutions to Overcome Nanoparticle Interference with LAL Assays and to Avoid Endotoxin Contamination in Nanoformulations -- Elemental Analysis in Biological Matrices Using ICP-MS -- PEG Quantitation Using Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Charged Aerosol Detection -- Quantitation of Surface Coating on Nanoparticles Using Thermogravimetric Analysis -- Immunoelectron Microscopy for Visualization of Nanoparticles -- Imaging of Liposomes by Transmission Electron Microscopy -- Updated Method for In Vitro Analysis of Nanoparticle Hemolytic Properties -- In Vitro Assessment of Nanoparticle Effects on Blood Coagulation -- In Vitro Analysis of Nanoparticle Effects on the Zymosan Uptake by Phagocytic Cells -- Assessing NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Nanoparticles -- Analysis of Complement Activation by Nanoparticles -- Methods for Analysis of Nanoparticle Immunosuppressive Properties In Vitro and In Vivo -- Analysis of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine and Type II Interferon Induction by Nanoparticles -- Analysis of Nanoparticle Adjuvant Properties In Vivo -- In Vitro and In Vivo Methods for Analysis of Nanoparticle Potential to Induce Delayed Type Hypersensitivity Reactions -- Autophagy Monitoring Assay II: Imaging Autophagy Induction in LLC-PK1 Cells Using GFP-LC3 Protein Fusion Construct -- Improved Ultrafiltration Method to Measure Drug Release from Nanomedicines Utilizing a Stable Isotope Tracer -- Designing an In Vivo Efficacy Study of Nanomedicines for Preclinical Tumor Growth Inhibition
    Abstract: This second edition volume expands on the first edition by providing up-to-date protocols to characterize nanomaterials used as drug delivery agents. The chapters in this book are divided into 5 parts and cover topics such as: advances and obstacles in nanomedicine research; methods to test sterility and endotoxin, physicochemical features, immunological effects, drug release, and in vivo efficacy. Written in the highly successful Methods in Molecular Biology series format, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible laboratory protocols, and tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Cutting-edge and comprehensive, Characterization of Nanoparticles Intended for Drug Delivery, Second Edition is a valuable tool for researchers and pharmaceutical and biotechnology developers who are evaluating the clinical potential of nanomedicines in preclinical studies.〉
    Pages: XII, 256 p. 72 illus., 40 illus. in color. : online resource.
    Edition: 2nd ed. 2018.
    ISBN: 9781493973521
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  • 2
    Call number: QZ365WP145:134(2)
    Keywords: Generative organs, Female / Surgery ; Evidence-Based Medicine ; Clinical medicine / Decision making ; Genital Neoplasms, Female / surgery ; Critical Care / methods ; Evidence-Based Medicine ; Gynecology / methods ; Perioperative Care / methods
    Description / Table of Contents: Evidence based medicine and decision support / Steven A. Vasilev -- Vascular access and other invasive procedures / Paul Koonings and Scott Lentz -- Fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition / Howard Silberman -- Preoperative evaluation / Devansu Tewari -- Postoperative surveillance and perioperative prophylaxis / Harriet Smith and Lejla Delic -- Perioperative infections : prevention and therapeutic options / Amy Stenson and Steven Vasilev -- Intraoperative and perioperative considerations in laparoscopy / Steven A. Vasilev and Scott E. Lentz -- Cervical carcinoma / Fernando Valea -- Endometrial carcinoma / Wendell Naumann -- Pelvic masses and ovarian carcinoma / Margarett Ellison -- Molar gestation / Allison E. Axtell and Steven A. Vasilev -- Perioperative issues in the management of vulvar carcinoma / Maliaka Amneus and Kathryn F. McGonigle -- Perioperative psychosocial considerations / Judith McKay -- Pain management in gynecologic oncology / Laszlo Galffy and Clayton Varga -- Fertility preservation in gynecologic oncology / Nicole Fleming -- Herbs / Scott Lentz and Alexander Vasilev -- End-of-life decision making / Scott E. Lentz
    Notes: Rev. ed. of: Perioperative and supportive care in gynecologic oncology : evidence-based management / edited by Steven A. Vasilev. c2000.
    Pages: xii, 557 p. : ill.
    Edition: 2nd ed.
    ISBN: 9780470083406
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    QZ365WP145:134(2) available
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  • 3
    Call number: 08-Chem
    Keywords: Chemical tests and reagents ; Organic compounds / Synthesis
    Pages: xvi, 746 p.
    ISBN: 0471979244
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    08-Chem departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 4
    Abstract: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Gene-macronutrient interactions may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes but research evidence to date is inconclusive. We aimed to increase our understanding of the aetiology of type 2 diabetes by investigating potential interactions between genes and macronutrient intake and their association with the incidence of type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We investigated the influence of interactions between genetic risk scores (GRSs) for type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and BMI and macronutrient intake on the development of type 2 diabetes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct, a prospective case-cohort study across eight European countries (N = 21,900 with 9742 incident type 2 diabetes cases). Macronutrient intake was estimated from diets reported in questionnaires, including proportion of energy derived from total carbohydrate, protein, fat, plant and animal protein, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat and dietary fibre. Using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression, we estimated country-specific interaction results on the multiplicative scale, using random-effects meta-analysis. Secondary analysis used isocaloric macronutrient substitution. RESULTS: No interactions were identified between any of the three GRSs and any macronutrient intake, with low-to-moderate heterogeneity between countries (I(2) range 0-51.6%). Results were similar using isocaloric macronutrient substitution analyses and when weighted and unweighted GRSs and individual SNPs were examined. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and BMI did not modify the association between macronutrient intake and incident type 2 diabetes. This suggests that macronutrient intake recommendations to prevent type 2 diabetes do not need to account for differences in genetic predisposition to these three metabolic conditions.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29549418
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1432-0800
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Medicine
    Notes: Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that commercial PCB mixtures which contain predominantly mono- and dichlorobiphenyls readily undergo primary biodegradation under the experimental conditions employed. The data also illustrates that as the levels of tri-, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyls increase, the degradation rates decrease accordingly. This resistance of the more highly chlorinated biphenyls, particularly those containing 5 or more chlorine atoms per molecule, explains in part their detection as residues in weathered biological and environmental samples.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1432-0800
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Medicine
    Notes: Summary The results of this study can be summarized as follows: (1) Monochlorobiphenyl and the 30%-chlorinated biphenyl MCS 1043 did not accumulate in the lipid reservoir of the rats when fed at 25 ppm and 100 ppm in the diet.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-2161
    Keywords: Key words Pyomyositis ; Tropical pyomyositis ; Muscle ; abscess
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract  Tropical pyomyositis is a rare cause of multiple abscesses of skeletal muscle. The entity is rare in temperate climates and, as its name suggests, is more common in areas such as the tropics and South Pacific. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of infection. Therapy is aggressive, with surgical debridement and drainage followed by antibiotics. We report an unusual case of tropical myositis which simulated tumor recurrence in a patient without the typical risk factors associated with tropical pyomyositis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1460-9568
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Neuromedin-U (NMU) has been reported to drive several physiological or behavioural responses following i.c.v. injection of the peptide into the third ventricle of rodent brains. Many of these responses are mediated through a change in corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) output from the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). A number of the physiological or behavioural responses are regulated in a circadian manner, e.g. feeding. We have previously reported NMU gene expression in the suprachiasmatci nucleus (SCN) and NMU-2 receptor expression in the PVN, dorsal medial hypothalamus (DMH) and other regions of the mouse brain. We therefore hypothesized that NMU would be regulated by the circadian clock and may consequently drive a circadian rhythm of CRF expression in the PVN. Here we report that NMU is regulated in a circadian manner with peak expression during the light phase of a light–dark cycle. In C3H mice held in constant darkness, the NMU rhythm free runs with a period predicted by the free running period of locomotor activity in this mouse. The NMU mRNA transcript colocalizes with cells expressing AVP in the SCN and shows a coincident rhythm of expression with AVP. On the other hand, CRF did not express a circadian rhythm of expression in a light–dark cycle, although a rhythm was evident in constant darkness with a peak of expression prior to the rise of NMU in the same conditions. This would suggest that the circadian rhythm in NMU expression in the SCN does not drive a circadian rhythm in CRF in the PVN to be translated into physiological and behavioural responses mediated by NMU.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1573-904X
    Keywords: permeability ; non-ionic detergent ; surfactants ; absorption ; intestinal toxicity
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1573-904X
    Keywords: permeability ; absorption ; intestinal toxicity ; bile salts ; non-ionic detergents ; sodium dodecyl sulfate
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Abstract The absorption of the polar drug phenol red was assessed in a rat intestinal perfusion model, in the presence of a variety of potential intestinal permeability enhancers. Both the absorption rate constant KA and the plasma phenol red concentration were measured. Perfusates were also assayed for the presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and lipid phosphate, as biochemical markers of intestinal wall damage. Histological evaluation of surfactant-perfused intestines was also carried out. The potential permeability enhancers studied were the surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium taurocholate (TC), sodium taurodeoxycholate (TDC), polysorbate-80 (PS-80), and nonylphenoxypolyoxyethylene (NP-POE) with an average polar group size of 10.5 POE units. Among these, SDS and NP-POE-10.5 were the most potent permeability enhancers. The bile salt TDC was a more effective enhancer than the more polar TC. The polar non-ionic surfactant PS-80 was an ineffective enhancer. Phenol red KA and plasma level were generally correlated with biochemical and histological measures of intestinal damage. These observations indicate that permeability enhancement and local damage are closely related sequelae of the interaction of surfactants with the intestinal wall, and suggest that local wall damage may be involved in the mechanism of permeability enhancement. The reversibility of permeability enhancement and acute local damage was assessed for the surfactants TDC and NP-POE-10.5. Enhancement of phenol red permeability was reversed within 1-2 hr of the cessation of enhancer treatment. Biochemical markers of local damage also fell to control values within 1-2 hr of removal of enhancer from the perfusate. Histological evaluation of perfused intestines revealed that morphological damage was reversed within 3 hr. These results demonstrate that surfactant-induced acute intestinal wall damage is rapidly repaired.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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