Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; IRRADIATION ; radiotherapy ; CELL ; Germany ; THERAPY ; TOXICITY ; COHORT ; RISK ; SURGERY ; radiation ; PATIENT ; DNA ; INDEX ; QUALITY ; SKIN ; treatment ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; LESIONS ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; ASSAY ; WOMEN ; DNA-REPAIR ; REPAIR ; COMET ASSAY ; DAMAGE ; LYMPHOCYTES ; BEAM ; DNA-DAMAGE ; PARAMETERS ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; KINETICS ; body mass index ; DNA repair ; DNA repair capacity ; PERIPHERAL-BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES ; ATAXIA-TELANGIECTASIA ; HETEROZYGOTES ; INTRINSIC RADIOSENSITIVITY ; radiation tolerance,DNA repair capacity,breast neoplasms,body mass index
    Abstract: Background and purpose: Intrinsic and extrinsic factors can affect the occurrence of side effects of radiotherapy. The influence of therapy modalities, personal characteristics and individual DNA repair capacity on the risk of acute skin toxicity was thus evaluated.Materials and methods: In a prospective study of 478 female breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy of the breast after breast-conserving surgery, acute skin toxicity was documented systematically using a modified version of the common toxicity criteria. Prognostic personal and treatment characteristics were identified for the entire cohort. Individual DNA repair capacity was determined in a subgroup of 113 patients with alkaline comet assay using phytohemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes. Using proportional hazards analysis to account for cumulative biologically effective radiation dose, the hazard for the development of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation) associated with DNA repair capacity was modeled.Results: Of the 478 participants, 84 presented with acute reactions by the end of treatment. Higher body mass index was significantly associated with an increased risk for acute reactions (hazard ratio = 1.09 per 1 kg/m(2)), adjusted for treating hospital and photon beam quality. The comet assay parameters examined, including background DNA damage in non-irradiated cells, DNA damage induced by 5 Gy, and DNA repair capacity, were not significantly associated with risk of acute skin toxicity.Conclusions: Higher BMI is predictive of acute skin toxicity, however, individual repair parameters as determined by the alkaline comet assay are not informative enough. More comprehensive analyses including late effects of radiotherapy and repair kinetics optimized for different radiation-induced DNA lesions are warranted. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14643951
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; IRRADIATION ; radiotherapy ; Germany ; THERAPY ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; SURGERY ; radiation ; PATIENT ; DNA ; DONOR ; RISK-FACTORS ; INDUCTION ; SKIN ; fibroblasts ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; ASSAY ; DNA-REPAIR ; REPAIR ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; COMET ASSAY ; DAMAGE ; LYMPHOCYTES ; DNA repair ; radiation sensitivity ; alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis assay ; CELLULAR RADIOSENSITIVITY ; CHROMOSOMAL RADIOSENSITIVITY ; DNA repair capacity ; DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS ; IN-VITRO RADIOSENSITIVITY ; NORMAL-TISSUE RADIOSENSITIVITY ; PERIPHERAL-BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES ; radiation effects ; radiosensitivity ; TELANGIECTASIA
    Abstract: Purpose: Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage plays a critical role for both the susceptibility of patients to side effects after radiotherapy and their subsequent cancer risk. The study objective was to evaluate whether DNA repair data determined in vitro are correlated with the occurrence of acute side effects during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy after a breast- conserving surgery were recruited in a prospective epidemiologic study. As an indicator for clinical radiosensitivity, adverse reactions of the skin were recorded. Cryo-preserved lymphocytes from 113 study participants were gamma-irradiated with 5 Gy in vitro and analyzed using the alkaline comet assay. Reproducibility of the assay was determined by repeated analysis (n = 26) of cells from a healthy donor. A coefficient of variation of 0.3 was calculated. Results: The various parameters determined to characterize the individual DNA repair capacity showed large differences between patients. Eleven patients were identified with considerably enhanced DNA damage induction, and 7 patients exhibited severely reduced DNA repair capacity after 15 and 30 min. Six patients were considered as clinically radiosensitive, indicated by moist desquamation of the skin after a total radiation dose of about 50 Gy. Conclusions: Using the alkaline comet assay as described here, breast cancer patients were identified showing abnormal cellular radiation effects, but this repair deficiency corresponded only at a very limited extent to the acute radiation sensitivity of the skin. Because impaired DNA repair could be involved in the development of late irradiation effects, individuals exhibiting severely reduced DNA repair capacity should be followed for the development of late clinical symptoms. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12654430
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...