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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; BLOOD ; PROSTATE ; DIAGNOSIS ; INFORMATION ; DISEASE ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TIME ; PATIENT ; SERA ; INDEX ; ANTIGEN ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; STAGE ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; BINDING-PROTEINS ; SELECTION ; ALCOHOL ; PREDICTORS ; body mass index ; HETEROGENEITY ; BINDING PROTEIN ; SERUM ; BODIES ; IGF-I ; GRADE ; EXTRACTION ; prospective studies ; METAANALYSIS ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; I IGF-I ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; POWER ; MASS ; PARTICIPANTS ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; USA ; HORMONES ; prospective ; prospective study ; NOR ; HIGH-GRADE ; CANCER-RISK ; ENGLAND ; SET ; Insulin-Like Growth Factor I ; steroids ; BINDING PROTEINS ; MEDICINE ; FACTOR AXIS ; LOW-GRADE ; androgens ; body mass ; SUBSEQUENT RISK ; synthesis ; RATIO ; BLOOD-LEVELS ; INVESTIGATORS ; COLLECTION ; growth factor ; PSA ERA
    Abstract: Background: Some, but not all, published results have shown an association between circulating blood levels of some insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the subsequent risk for prostate cancer. Purpose: To assess the association between levels of IGFs and IGFBPs and the subsequent risk for prostate cancer. Data Sources: Studies identified in PubMed, Web of Science, and CancerLit. Study Selection: The principal investigators of all studies that published data on circulating concentrations of sex steroids, IGFs, or IGFBPs and prostate cancer risk using prospectively collected blood samples were invited to collaborate. Data Extraction: Investigators provided individual participant data on circulating concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-II, and IGFBP-III and participant characteristics to a central data set in Oxford, United Kingdom. Data Synthesis: The study included data on 3700 men with prostate cancer and 5200 control participants. On average, case patients were 61.5 years of age at blood collection and received a diagnosis of prostate cancer 5 years after blood collection. The greater the serum IGF-I concentration, the greater the subsequent risk for prostate cancer (odds ratio [OR] in the highest vs. lowest quintile, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.19 to 1.60]; P 〈 0.001 for trend). Neither IGF-II nor IGFBP-II concentrations were associated with prostate cancer risk, but statistical power was limited. Insulin-like growth factor I and IGFBP-III were correlated (r = 0.58), and although IGFBP-III concentration seemed to be associated with prostate cancer risk, this was secondary to its association with IGF-I levels. Insulin-like growth factor I concentrations seemed to be more positively associated with low-grade than high-grade disease; otherwise, the association between IGFs and IGFBPs and prostate cancer risk had no statistically significant heterogeneity related to stage or grade of disease, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age and year of diagnosis, prostate-specific antigen level at recruitment, body mass index, smoking, or alcohol intake. Limitations: Insulin-like growth factor concentrations were measured in only 1 sample for each participant, and the laboratory methods to measure IGFs differed in each study. Not all patients had disease stage or grade information, and the diagnosis of prostate cancer may differ among the studies. Conclusion: High circulating IGF-I concentrations are associated with a moderately increased risk for prostate cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18838726
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; genetics ; familial risk ; USA ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; Genetic ; 33 ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Genome-wide association studies
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified seven breast cancer susceptibility loci, but these explain only a small fraction of the familial risk of the disease. Five of these loci were identified through a two-stage GWAS involving 390 familial cases and 364 controls in the first stage, and 3,990 cases and 3,916 controls in the second stage(1). To identify additional loci, we tested over 800 promising associations from this GWAS in a further two stages involving 37,012 cases and 40,069 controls from 33 studies in the CGEMS collaboration and Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We found strong evidence for additional susceptibility loci on 3p (rs4973768: per-allele OR 1.11, 95% CI = 1.08-1.13, P = 4.1 x 10(-23)) and 17q (rs6504950: per-allele OR 0.95, 95% CI = 0.92-0.97, P = 1.4 x 10(-8)). Potential causative genes include SLC4A7 and NEK10 on 3p and COX11 on 17q
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19330027
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  • 3
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Truncating mutations in ATM have been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer but the effect of missense variants remains contentious. METHODS: We have genotyped five polymorphic (minor allele frequency, 0.9-2.6%) missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in ATM (S49C, S707P, F858L, P1054R, and L1420F) in 26,101 breast cancer cases and 29,842 controls from 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. RESULTS: Combining the data from all five SNPs, the odds ratio (OR) was 1.05 for being a heterozygote for any of the SNPs and 1.51 for being a rare homozygote for any of the SNPs with an overall trend OR of 1.06 (P(trend) = 0.04). The trend OR among bilateral and familial cases was 1.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.23; P(trend) = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: In this large combined analysis, these five missense ATM SNPs were associated with a small increased risk of breast cancer, explaining an estimated 0.03% of the excess familial risk of breast cancer. Impact: Testing the combined effects of rare missense variants in known breast cancer genes in large collaborative studies should clarify their overall contribution to breast cancer susceptibility.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20826828
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; SERUM CONCENTRATIONS ; fat distribution ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; HORMONES ; ADRENAL ANDROGENS ; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE-SULFATE ; STEROID-HORMONES ; BINDING GLOBULIN ; ESTRADIOL LEVELS ; androgens ; sex hormone-binding globulin ; oestrogens
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women is positively associated with circulating concentrations of oestrogens and androgens, but the determinants of these hormones are not well understood. METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses of breast cancer risk factors and circulating hormone concentrations in more than 6000 postmenopausal women controls in 13 prospective studies. RESULTS: Concentrations of all hormones were lower in older than younger women, with the largest difference for dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), whereas sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was higher in the older women. Androgens were lower in women with bilateral ovariectomy than in naturally postmenopausal women, with the largest difference for free testosterone. All hormones were higher in obese than lean women, with the largest difference for free oestradiol, whereas SHBG was lower in obese women. Smokers of 15+ cigarettes per day had higher levels of all hormones than non-smokers, with the largest difference for testosterone. Drinkers of 20+ g alcohol per day had higher levels of all hormones, but lower SHBG, than non-drinkers, with the largest difference for DHEAS. Hormone concentrations were not strongly related to age at menarche, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy or family history of breast cancer. CONCLUSION: Sex hormone concentrations were strongly associated with several established or suspected risk factors for breast cancer, and may mediate the effects of these factors on breast cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21772329
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  • 5
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; HISTORY ; RISK ; SAMPLE ; TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR ; FAMILY ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; FREQUENCIES ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; HEALTH ; AGE ; WOMEN ; SNP ; cancer risk ; GENOTYPES ; HETEROGENEITY ; FAMILIES ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; ESTROGEN ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; ALLELES ; biomarker ; GENOTYPE ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; USA ; CANCER-RISK ; Sample Size ; CONSORTIUM ; ERCC4 ; RECEPTOR STATUS ; PROGESTERONE-RECEPTOR GENE ; CASP8
    Abstract: Previous studies have suggested that minor alleles for ERCC4 rs744154, TNF rs361525, CASP10 rs13010627, PGR rs1042838, and BID rs8190315 may influence breast cancer risk, but the evidence is inconclusive due to their small sample size. These polymorphisms were genotyped in more than 30,000 breast cancer cases and 30,000 controls, primarily of European descent, from 30 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) as a measure of association. We found that the minor alleles for these polymorphisms were not related to invasive breast cancer risk overall in women of European descent: ECCR4 per-allele OR (95% CI) = 0.99 (0.97-1.02), minor allele frequency = 27.5%; TNF 1.00 (0.95-1.06), 5.0%; CASP10 1.02 (0.98-1.07), 6.5%; PGR 1.02 (0.99-1.06), 15.3%; and BID 0.98 (0.86-1.12), 1.7%. However, we observed significant between-study heterogeneity for associations with risk for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in CASP10, PGR, and BID. Estimates were imprecise for women of Asian and African descent due to small numbers and lower minor allele frequencies (with the exception of BID SNP). The ORs for each copy of the minor allele were not significantly different by estrogen or progesterone receptor status, nor were any significant interactions found between the polymorphisms and age or family history of breast cancer. In conclusion, our data provide persuasive evidence against an overall association between invasive breast cancer risk and ERCC4 rs744154, TNF rs361525, CASPIO rs13010627, PGR rs1042838, and BID rs8190315 genotypes among women of European descent. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(5):1610-6)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19423537
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  • 6
    Keywords: GENE ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; WOMEN ; ESTROGEN ; ATM
    Abstract: Background Using the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, the authors previously reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism 7q21-rs6964587 (AKAP9-M463I) is associated with breast cancer risk. The authors have now assessed this association more comprehensively using 16 independent case-control studies. Methods The authors genotyped 14 843 invasive case patients and 19 852 control subjects with white European ancestry and 2595 invasive case patients and 2192 control subjects with Asian ancestry. ORs were estimated by logistic regression, adjusted for study. Heterogeneity in ORs was assessed by fitting interaction terms or by subclassifying case patients and applying polytomous logistic regression. Results For white European women, the minor T allele of 7q21-rs6964587 was associated with breast cancer risk under a recessive model (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.13, p=0.04). Results were inconclusive for Asian women. From a combined analysis of 24 154 case patients and 33 376 control subjects of white European ancestry from the present and previous series, the best-fitting model was recessive, with an estimated OR of 1.08 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.13, p=0.001). The OR was greater at younger ages (p trend=0.01). Conclusion This may be the first common susceptibility allele for breast cancer to be identified with a recessive mode of inheritance
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21931171
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  • 7
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; KINASE ; DIAGNOSIS ; SUPPORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; DISTINCT ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; PROTEIN-KINASE ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; prevention ; DIFFERENCE ; genetics ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; PROGNOSTIC FACTORS ; PROGNOSTIC FACTOR ; heredity ; KERATINOCYTE GROWTH-FACTOR ; HETEROGENEITY ; fibroblast ; SNPs ; overall survival ; GRADE ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTOR ; METAANALYSIS ; ESTROGEN ; USA ; CANCER-RISK ; comparison ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; LOW-GRADE ; FGFR2 ; NUCLEOTIDE ; genetic variants
    Abstract: A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs) in five loci ( fibroblast growth receptor 2 ( FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 ( TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte- specific protein 1 ( LSP1)) associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether the associations between these SNPs and breast cancer risk varied by clinically important tumor characteristics in up to 23,039 invasive breast cancer cases and 26,273 controls from 20 studies. We also evaluated their influence on overall survival in 13,527 cases from 13 studies. All participants were of European or Asian origin. rs2981582 in FGFR2 was more strongly related to ER- positive ( per- allele OR ( 95%CI) = 1.31 (1.27-1.36)) than ER- negative (1.08 (1.03- 1.14)) disease ( P for heterogeneity = 10-(13)). This SNP was also more strongly related to PR-positive, low grade and node positive tumors (P = 10(-5), 10(-8), 0.013, respectively). The association for rs13281615 in 8q24 was stronger for ER- positive, PR-positive, and low grade tumors (P = 0.001, 0.011 and 10(-4), respectively). The differences in the associations between SNPs in FGFR2 and 8q24 and risk by ER and grade remained significant after permutation adjustment for multiple comparisons and after adjustment for other tumor characteristics. Three SNPs ( rs2981582, rs3803662, and rs889312) showed weak but significant associations with ER- negative disease, the strongest association being for rs3803662 in TNRC9 ( 1.14 ( 1.09-1.21)). rs13281615 in 8q24 was associated with an improvement in survival after diagnosis ( per- allele HR = 0.90 (0.83-0.97). The association was attenuated and non-significant after adjusting for known prognostic factors. Our findings show that common genetic variants influence the pathological subtype of breast cancer and provide further support for the hypothesis that ER- positive and ER- negative disease are biologically distinct. Understanding the etiologic heterogeneity of breast cancer may ultimately result in improvements in prevention, early detection, and treatment
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18437204
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  • 8
  • 9
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; MODEL ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ESTROGEN ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; BIRTH ; HORMONE-RECEPTOR ; susceptibility loci ; REPAIR GENES ; EPITHELIAL OVARIAN-CANCER ; BASAL-LIKE SUBTYPE ; DIFFERENT HISTOPATHOLOGIC TYPES ; PROGESTERONE-RECEPTOR STATUS
    Abstract: Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Logistic regression models were used in case-case analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and tumor subtypes, and case-control analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and the risk of developing specific tumor subtypes in 12 population-based studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In case-case analyses, of the epidemiological risk factors examined, early age at menarche (〈= 12 years) was less frequent in case patients with PR- than PR+ tumors (P = .001). Nulliparity (P = 3 x 10(-6)) and increasing age at first birth (P = 2 x 10(-9)) were less frequent in ER- than in ER+ tumors. Obesity (body mass index [BMI] 〉= 30 kg/m(2)) in younger women (〈= 50 years) was more frequent in ER /PR than in ER+/PR+ tumors (P = 1 x 10(-7)), whereas obesity in older women (〉50 years) was less frequent in PR- than in PR+ tumors (P = 6 x 10(-4)). The triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2-) or core basal phenotype (CBP; triple-negative and cytokeratins [CK]5/6(+) and/ or epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] 1) accounted for much of the heterogeneity in parity-related variables and BMI in younger women. Case-control analyses showed that nulliparity, increasing age at first birth, and obesity in younger women showed the expected associations with the risk of ER+ or PR+ tumors but not triple-negative (nulliparity vs parity, odds ratio [OR] = 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75 to 1.19, P = .61; 5-year increase in age at first full-term birth, OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.86 to 1.05, P = .34; obesity in younger women, OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 0.95 to 1.94, P = .09) or CBP tumors. Conclusions This study shows that reproductive factors and BMI are most clearly associated with hormone receptor-positive tumors and suggest that triple-negative or CBP tumors may have distinct etiology
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21191117
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1365-2133
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background  The epidemiology of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is not fully understood. Although a strong genetic basis has long been identified, little is known of its non-genetic causes.Objectives  To estimate the prevalence of and to determine risk factors for AGA in men aged 40–69 years in Australia.Methods  Men (n = 1390) were recruited at random from the electoral rolls to serve as controls in a population-based case–control study of prostate cancer. All were interviewed in person and direct observations of AGA were made. Men were grouped into the following categories; no AGA, frontal AGA, vertex AGA and full AGA (frontal and vertex AGA). Epidemiological data collected from these men were used for an analysis of risk factors for each AGA category using unconditional logistic regression with AGA category as the response variable adjusting for age, education and country of birth.Results  The prevalence of vertex and full AGA increased with age from 31% (age 40–55 years) to 53% (age 65–69 years). Conversely, the proportion of men with only frontal AGA was very similar across all age groups (31–33%). No associations were found between pubertal growth spurt or acne, reports of adult body size at time of interview, urinary symptom score, marital status, or current smoking status or duration of smoking and the risk of any form of AGA. The consumption of alcohol was associated with a significant increase in risk of frontal and vertex AGA but not full AGA. Men with vertex AGA had fewer female sexual partners but average ejaculatory frequency did not differ between men in different AGA categories. Reported weight and lean body mass at reaching maturity at about 21 years of age were negatively associated with vertex balding (P for trend 〈 0·05) but not with frontal AGA or full AGA.Conclusions  Evidence for environmental influences on AGA remains very slight. Our study failed to confirm previously reported or hypothesized associations with smoking and benign prostatic hypertrophy. The associations that we found with alcohol consumption and with lean body mass at age 21 years would be worthy of further research if they were able to be replicated in other studies.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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