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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-10-16
    Description: Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Peifer, Martin -- Hertwig, Falk -- Roels, Frederik -- Dreidax, Daniel -- Gartlgruber, Moritz -- Menon, Roopika -- Kramer, Andrea -- Roncaioli, Justin L -- Sand, Frederik -- Heuckmann, Johannes M -- Ikram, Fakhera -- Schmidt, Rene -- Ackermann, Sandra -- Engesser, Anne -- Kahlert, Yvonne -- Vogel, Wenzel -- Altmuller, Janine -- Nurnberg, Peter -- Thierry-Mieg, Jean -- Thierry-Mieg, Danielle -- Mariappan, Aruljothi -- Heynck, Stefanie -- Mariotti, Erika -- Henrich, Kai-Oliver -- Gloeckner, Christian -- Bosco, Graziella -- Leuschner, Ivo -- Schweiger, Michal R -- Savelyeva, Larissa -- Watkins, Simon C -- Shao, Chunxuan -- Bell, Emma -- Hofer, Thomas -- Achter, Viktor -- Lang, Ulrich -- Theissen, Jessica -- Volland, Ruth -- Saadati, Maral -- Eggert, Angelika -- de Wilde, Bram -- Berthold, Frank -- Peng, Zhiyu -- Zhao, Chen -- Shi, Leming -- Ortmann, Monika -- Buttner, Reinhard -- Perner, Sven -- Hero, Barbara -- Schramm, Alexander -- Schulte, Johannes H -- Herrmann, Carl -- O'Sullivan, Roderick J -- Westermann, Frank -- Thomas, Roman K -- Fischer, Matthias -- England -- Nature. 2015 Oct 29;526(7575):700-4. doi: 10.1038/nature14980. Epub 2015 Oct 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Translational Genomics, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, University Children's Hospital of Cologne, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany. ; Division Neuroblastoma Genomics (B087), German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Department of Prostate Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, Center for Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, University Hospital of Bonn, 53127 Bonn, Germany. ; NEO New Oncology AG, 51105 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. ; Cologne Center for Genomics, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Munster, 48149 Munster, Germany. ; Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20894, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of Kiel, 24118 Kiel, Germany. ; Functional Epigenomics, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Cell Biology, Center for Biologic Imaging, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. ; Division of Theoretical Systems Biology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Computing Center, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Informatics, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Division of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Charite University Medical Center Berlin, 10117 Berlin, Germany. ; Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Bei Shan Industrial Zone, Yantian District, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518083 China. ; Center for Pharmacogenomics and Fudan-Zhangjiang Center for Clinical Genomics, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology School of Pharmacy and School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Pathology, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, University Children's Hospital, 45147 Essen, Germany. ; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), 10117 Berlin, Germany. ; German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Institute of Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Bioquant Center, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, 50931 Cologne, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26466568" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Keywords: GENE ; neuroblastoma ; ENHANCERS ; LANDSCAPE ; TERT REARRANGEMENTS
    Abstract: Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26466568
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1572-9699
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Samples of a carbonated orange drink, raw materials, and intermediate products originating from 6 Iraqi bottling plants were examined. 69 drinks, 4 flavoured syrups and 19 simple syrups contained yeasts, whereas all samples from one plant and all samples of beverage base were free from viable yeasts. From the orange drink 2 species were isolated viz. Saccharomyces montanus and Torulopsis stellata. The following species were present in simple syrup: Hansenula anomala, Sacch. bisporus var. mellis, T. candida and T. stellata. Sacch. bisporus var. mellis was also isolated from flavoured syrup. Representative strains were submitted to routine growth tests at reduced oxygen tension, at reduced water activity and on solid soft-drink media containing various amounts of anti-microbially active benzoic acid at pH 3.0. The results are discussed and compared to those obtained in European soft drinks.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-10-03
    Description: It has been shown that human papillomavirus (HPV) and p16 status has prognostic value in some HPV-associated cancers. However, studies examining survival in men with penile cancer according to HPV or p16 status are often inconclusive, mainly because of small study populations. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the association between HPV DNA and p16 status and survival in men diagnosed with penile cancer. Multiple electronic databases were searched. Twenty studies were ultimately included and study-specific and pooled HRs of overall survival and disease-specific survival (DSS) were calculated using a fixed effects model. In the analysis of DSS, we included 649 men with penile cancer tested for HPV (27% were HPV-positive) and 404 men tested for p16 expression (47% were p16-positive). The pooled HR HPV of DSS was 0.61 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.38–0.98], and the pooled HR p16 of DSS was 0.45 (95% CI, 0.30–0.69). In conclusion, men with HPV or p16-positive penile cancer have a significantly more favorable DSS compared with men with HPV or p16-negative penile cancer. These findings point to the possible clinical value of HPV and p16 testing when planning the most optimal management and follow-up strategy. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(10); 1123–32. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-12-07
    Description: Neuroblastoma is a pediatric tumor of the sympathetic nervous system. Its clinical course ranges from spontaneous tumor regression to fatal progression. To investigate the molecular features of the divergent tumor subtypes, we performed genome sequencing on 416 pretreatment neuroblastomas and assessed telomere maintenance mechanisms in 208 of these tumors. We found that patients whose tumors lacked telomere maintenance mechanisms had an excellent prognosis, whereas the prognosis of patients whose tumors harbored telomere maintenance mechanisms was substantially worse. Survival rates were lowest for neuroblastoma patients whose tumors harbored telomere maintenance mechanisms in combination with RAS and/or p53 pathway mutations. Spontaneous tumor regression occurred both in the presence and absence of these mutations in patients with telomere maintenance–negative tumors. On the basis of these data, we propose a mechanistic classification of neuroblastoma that may benefit the clinical management of patients.
    Keywords: Medicine, Diseases
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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