Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Pathological gambling is a behavioural addiction with negative economic, social, and psychological consequences. Identification of contributing genes and pathways may improve understanding of aetiology and facilitate therapy and prevention. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study of pathological gambling. Our aims were to identify pathways involved in pathological gambling, and examine whether there is a genetic overlap between pathological gambling and alcohol dependence. METHODS: Four hundred and forty-five individuals with a diagnosis of pathological gambling according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were recruited in Germany, and 986 controls were drawn from a German general population sample. A genome-wide association study of pathological gambling comprising single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses, was performed. Polygenic risk scores were generated using data from a German genome-wide association study of alcohol dependence. RESULTS: No genome-wide significant association with pathological gambling was found for single markers or genes. Pathways for Huntington's disease (P-value=6.63x10(-3)); 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signalling (P-value=9.57x10(-3)); and apoptosis (P-value=1.75x10(-2)) were significant. Polygenic risk score analysis of the alcohol dependence dataset yielded a one-sided nominal significant P-value in subjects with pathological gambling, irrespective of comorbid alcohol dependence status. CONCLUSIONS: The present results accord with previous quantitative formal genetic studies which showed genetic overlap between non-substance- and substance-related addictions. Furthermore, pathway analysis suggests shared pathology between Huntington's disease and pathological gambling. This finding is consistent with previous imaging studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27315593
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-06-13
    Description: During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Richiardi, Jonas -- Altmann, Andre -- Milazzo, Anna-Clare -- Chang, Catie -- Chakravarty, M Mallar -- Banaschewski, Tobias -- Barker, Gareth J -- Bokde, Arun L W -- Bromberg, Uli -- Buchel, Christian -- Conrod, Patricia -- Fauth-Buhler, Mira -- Flor, Herta -- Frouin, Vincent -- Gallinat, Jurgen -- Garavan, Hugh -- Gowland, Penny -- Heinz, Andreas -- Lemaitre, Herve -- Mann, Karl F -- Martinot, Jean-Luc -- Nees, Frauke -- Paus, Tomas -- Pausova, Zdenka -- Rietschel, Marcella -- Robbins, Trevor W -- Smolka, Michael N -- Spanagel, Rainer -- Strohle, Andreas -- Schumann, Gunter -- Hawrylycz, Mike -- Poline, Jean-Baptiste -- Greicius, Michael D -- IMAGEN consortium -- 93558/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- R01 MH085772-01A1/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01NS073498/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U54 EB020403/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- Department of Health/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 12;348(6240):1241-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1255905. Epub 2015 Jun 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Laboratory of Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, Department of Neuroscience, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. jonas.richiardi@unige.ch greicius@stanford.edu. ; Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. ; The War Related Illness and Injury Study Center, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA. Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. ; Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ; Cerebral Imaging Centre, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada. Departments of Psychiatry and Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. ; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. ; Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. ; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Department of Psychiatry, Universite de Montreal, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Ste Justine Hospital, Montreal, Canada. ; Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Neurospin, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Paris, France. ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. ; Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA. ; School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ; Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM Unit 1000 "Neuroimaging and Psychiatry," University Paris Sud, Orsay, France. INSERM Unit 1000 at Maison de Solenn, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Cochin Hospital, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France. ; Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ; The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ; Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden, Germany. ; Department of Psychopharmacology, Central Institute of Mental Health, Faculty of Clinical Medicine Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Medical Research Council (MRC) Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London, UK. ; Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, WA, USA. ; Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. ; Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. jonas.richiardi@unige.ch greicius@stanford.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26068849" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Adult ; Animals ; Brain/metabolism/*physiology ; Female ; Gene Expression ; Humans ; Ion Channels/*genetics ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Mice ; Nerve Net/metabolism/*physiology ; Neural Pathways/metabolism/physiology ; Polymorphism, Genetic ; Rest/*physiology ; Synapses/metabolism/physiology ; *Transcriptome ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: A comprehensive account of the causes of alcohol misuse must accommodate individual differences in biology, psychology and environment, and must disentangle cause and effect. Animal models can demonstrate the effects of neurotoxic substances; however, they provide limited insight into the psycho-social and higher cognitive factors involved in the initiation of substance use and progression to misuse. One can search for pre-existing risk factors by testing for endophenotypic biomarkers in non-using relatives; however, these relatives may have personality or neural resilience factors that protect them from developing dependence. A longitudinal study has potential to identify predictors of adolescent substance misuse, particularly if it can incorporate a wide range of potential causal factors, both proximal and distal, and their influence on numerous social, psychological and biological mechanisms. Here we apply machine learning to a wide range of data from a large sample of adolescents (n = 692) to generate models of current and future adolescent alcohol misuse that incorporate brain structure and function, individual personality and cognitive differences, environmental factors (including gestational cigarette and alcohol exposure), life experiences, and candidate genes. These models were accurate and generalized to novel data, and point to life experiences, neurobiological differences and personality as important antecedents of binge drinking. By identifying the vulnerability factors underlying individual differences in alcohol misuse, these models shed light on the aetiology of alcohol misuse and suggest targets for prevention.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486207/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486207/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Whelan, Robert -- Watts, Richard -- Orr, Catherine A -- Althoff, Robert R -- Artiges, Eric -- Banaschewski, Tobias -- Barker, Gareth J -- Bokde, Arun L W -- Buchel, Christian -- Carvalho, Fabiana M -- Conrod, Patricia J -- Flor, Herta -- Fauth-Buhler, Mira -- Frouin, Vincent -- Gallinat, Juergen -- Gan, Gabriela -- Gowland, Penny -- Heinz, Andreas -- Ittermann, Bernd -- Lawrence, Claire -- Mann, Karl -- Martinot, Jean-Luc -- Nees, Frauke -- Ortiz, Nick -- Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure -- Paus, Tomas -- Pausova, Zdenka -- Rietschel, Marcella -- Robbins, Trevor W -- Smolka, Michael N -- Strohle, Andreas -- Schumann, Gunter -- Garavan, Hugh -- IMAGEN Consortium -- MH082116/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- P20 GM103644/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P20GM103644/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 DA036114/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- P50DA036114/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2014 Aug 14;512(7513):185-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13402. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Department of Psychology, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland. ; Department of Radiology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; 1] Department of Pediatrics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; 1] Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM CEA Unit 1000 "Imaging &Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, 91400 Orsay, France [2] Department of Psychiatry, Orsay Hospital, 4 place du General Leclerc, 91400 Orsay, France. ; Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. ; Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] Department of Systems Neuroscience, Universitatsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany [2] Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; 1] Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK [2] Department of Psychiatry, Universite de Montreal, CHU Ste Justine Hospital, Montreal H3T 1C5, Canada. ; 1] Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany [2] Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany. ; 14 CEA, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin bat 145, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette, France. ; 1] Department of Systems Neuroscience, Universitatsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany [2] Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin 10117, Germany. ; Department of Psychiatry and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universitat Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany. ; School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK. ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin 10117, Germany. ; Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), 10587 Berlin, Germany. ; School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK. ; 1] Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM CEA Unit 1000 "Imaging &Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, 91400 Orsay, France [2] AP-HP Department of Adolescent Psychopathology and Medicine, Maison de Solenn, University Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin 10117, Germany [2] AP-HP Department of Adolescent Psychopathology and Medicine, Maison de Solenn, University Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France. ; 1] Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5R 0A3, Canada [2] Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, H3A 2B4, Canada. ; The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 0A4, Canada. ; Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK. ; 1] Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK [2] MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London, London WC2R 2LS, UK. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [3] Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043041" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Alcohol Drinking/*psychology ; Alcoholism/genetics/prevention & control/*psychology ; Artificial Intelligence ; Brain/physiology ; Cognition/physiology ; Environment ; Humans ; Life Change Events ; Longitudinal Studies ; *Models, Theoretical ; Personality/physiology ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Psychology ; Reproducibility of Results ; Risk Factors
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...