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  • 1
    Abstract: The characteristics of early developmental regression (EDR) were investigated in individuals with ASD from affected relative pairs recruited to the International Molecular Genetic Study of Autism Consortium (IMGSAC). Four hundred and fifty-eight individuals with ASD were recruited from 226 IMGSAC families. Regression before age 36 months occurred in 23.9% of individuals. The observed concordance rate for EDR within sibling pairs (18.9%) was not significantly above the rate expected under independence (13.5%, p = 0.10). The rate of regression in individuals with ASD from multiplex families was similar to that reported in singleton and epidemiological samples. Regression concordance data were not supportive of a separate familial influence on EDR, other than as a part of autism itself.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20711649
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  • 2
    Keywords: POPULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; SCHIZOPHRENIA ; PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS ; INDIVIDUALS ; SPECTRUM DISORDERS ; Copy number variation ; GENETIC ARCHITECTURE ; NEUROPSYCHIATRIC CONDITIONS ; PTEN MUTATIONS
    Abstract: Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P 〈 5 x 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P 〈 5 x 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20663923
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  • 3
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SCHIZOPHRENIA ; COPY NUMBER ; SNP ; NEURONS ; MENTAL-RETARDATION ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; GLUTAMATE-RECEPTOR-6 GENE ; LINKAGE ANALYSES ; RUNS
    Abstract: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a highly heritable disorder of complex and heterogeneous aetiology. It is primarily characterized by altered cognitive ability including impaired language and communication skills and fundamental deficits in social reciprocity. Despite some notable successes in neuropsychiatric genetics, overall, the high heritability of ASD (round 90%) remains poorly explained by common genetic risk variants. However, recent studies suggest that rare genomic variation, in particular copy number variation, may account for a significant proportion of the genetic basis of ASD. We present a large scale analysis to identify candidate genes which may contain low-frequency recessive variation contributing to ASD while taking into account the potential contribution of population differences to the genetic heterogeneity of ASD. Our strategy, homozygous haplotype (HH) mapping, aims to detect homozygous segments of identical haplotype structure that are shared at a higher frequency amongst ASD patients compared to parental controls. The analysis was performed on 1,402 Autism Genome Project trios genotyped for 1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We identified 25 known and 1,218 novel ASD candidate genes in the discovery analysis including CADM2, ABHD14A, CHRFAM7A, GRIK2, GRM3, EPHA3, FGF10, KCND2, PDZK1, IMMP2L and FOXP2. Furthermore, 10 of the previously reported ASD genes and 300 of the novel candidates identified in the discovery analysis were replicated in an independent sample of 1,182 trios. Our results demonstrate that regions of HH are significantly enriched for previously reported ASD candidate genes and the observed association is independent of gene size (odds ratio 2.10). Our findings highlight the applicability of HH mapping in complex disorders such as ASD and offer an alternative approach to the analysis of genome-wide association data.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21996756
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  • 4
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Over the past decade genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been applied to aid in the understanding of the biology of traits. The success of this approach is governed by the underlying effect sizes carried by the true risk variants and the corresponding statistical power to observe such effects given the study design and sample size under investigation. Previous ASD GWAS have identified genome-wide significant (GWS) risk loci; however, these studies were of only of low statistical power to identify GWS loci at the lower effect sizes (odds ratio (OR) 〈1.15). METHODS: We conducted a large-scale coordinated international collaboration to combine independent genotyping data to improve the statistical power and aid in robust discovery of GWS loci. This study uses genome-wide genotyping data from a discovery sample (7387 ASD cases and 8567 controls) followed by meta-analysis of summary statistics from two replication sets (7783 ASD cases and 11359 controls; and 1369 ASD cases and 137308 controls). RESULTS: We observe a GWS locus at 10q24.32 that overlaps several genes including PITX3, which encodes a transcription factor identified as playing a role in neuronal differentiation and CUEDC2 previously reported to be associated with social skills in an independent population cohort. We also observe overlap with regions previously implicated in schizophrenia which was further supported by a strong genetic correlation between these disorders (Rg = 0.23; P = 9 x 10-6). We further combined these Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) ASD GWAS data with the recent PGC schizophrenia GWAS to identify additional regions which may be important in a common neurodevelopmental phenotype and identified 12 novel GWS loci. These include loci previously implicated in ASD such as FOXP1 at 3p13, ATP2B2 at 3p25.3, and a 'neurodevelopmental hub' on chromosome 8p11.23. CONCLUSIONS: This study is an important step in the ongoing endeavour to identify the loci which underpin the common variant signal in ASD. In addition to novel GWS loci, we have identified a significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia and association of ASD with several neurodevelopmental-related genes such as EXT1, ASTN2, MACROD2, and HDAC4.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28540026
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  • 5
    Keywords: GENE ; DELETIONS ; MENTAL-RETARDATION ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CNTNAP2 ; Copy number variation ; DE-NOVO MUTATIONS ; LINKAGE ANALYSES ; DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
    Abstract: While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm〈 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22843504
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  • 6
    Keywords: SPECTRA ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLES ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; FAMILY ; ASSOCIATION ; chromosome ; LINKAGE ; NUMBER ; SNP ; HUMAN GENOME ; TWIN ; PREVALENCE ; DISSECTION ; GLUTAMATE ; FAMILIES ; ARRAY ; REARRANGEMENT ; CANDIDATE ; SPECTRUM ; MENTAL-RETARDATION ; LOCI ; NEUROLIGINS ; SPECTRUM DISORDERS
    Abstract: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASDs is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASDs by using Affymetrix 10K SNP arrays and 1,168 families with at least two affected individuals, performing the largest linkage scan to date while also analyzing copy number variation in these families. Linkage and copy number variation analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, among other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for contributing to ASDs
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17322880
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  • 7
    Keywords: proliferation ; COMBINATION ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; GENE ; GENES ; COMPLEX ; FAMILY ; IMPACT ; ASSOCIATION ; DISORDER ; FREQUENCY ; LINKAGE ; VARIANTS ; TARGET ; COPY NUMBER ; ARRAYS ; NUMBER ; genotyping ; MUTATIONS ; REVEALS ; TARGETS ; CHILDREN ; DISORDERS ; VARIANT ; DETERMINANTS ; SCIENCE ; development ; LOCUS ; MOTILITY ; LOCI ; SPECTRUM DISORDERS ; Genetic ; RANGE ; Lead ; COPY NUMBER VARIANTS ; Copy number variation ; ANCESTRY ; GENETIC DISORDER ; HIDDEN-MARKOV MODEL ; SNP GENOTYPING DATA
    Abstract: The autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of conditions characterized by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviours(1). Individuals with an ASD vary greatly in cognitive development, which can range from above average to intellectual disability(2). Although ASDs are known to be highly heritable (similar to 90%)(3), the underlying genetic determinants are still largely unknown. Here we analysed the genome-wide characteristics of rare (〈1% frequency) copy number variation in ASD using dense genotyping arrays. When comparing 996 ASD individuals of European ancestry to 1,287 matched controls, cases were found to carry a higher global burden of rare, genic copy number variants (CNVs) (1.19 fold, P=0.012), especially so for loci previously implicated in either ASD and/or intellectual disability (1.69 fold, P=3.4 x 10(-4)). Among the CNVs there were numerous de novo and inherited events, sometimes in combination in a given family, implicating many novel ASD genes such as SHANK2, SYNGAP1, DLGAP2 and the X-linked DDX53-PTCHD1 locus. We also discovered an enrichment of CNVs disrupting functional gene sets involved in cellular proliferation, projection and motility, and GTPase/Ras signalling. Our results reveal many new genetic and functional targets in ASD that may lead to final connected pathways
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20531469
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  • 8
    Abstract: Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated a range of genes from discrete biological pathways in the aetiology of autism. However, despite the strong influence of genetic factors, association studies have yet to identify statistically robust, replicated major effect genes or SNPs. We apply the principle of the SNP ratio test methodology described by O'Dushlaine et al to over 2100 families from the Autism Genome Project (AGP). Using a two-stage design we examine association enrichment in 5955 unique gene-ontology classifications across four groupings based on two phenotypic and two ancestral classifications. Based on estimates from simulation we identify excess of association enrichment across all analyses. We observe enrichment in association for sets of genes involved in diverse biological processes, including pyruvate metabolism, transcription factor activation, cell-signalling and cell-cycle regulation. Both genes and processes that show enrichment have previously been examined in autistic disorders and offer biologically plausibility to these findings.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21522181
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  • 9
    Keywords: RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; SCHIZOPHRENIA ; CROHNS-DISEASE ; ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER ; BIPOLAR DISORDER ; MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER ; Autism spectrum disorders ; DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER ; COMMON SNPS
    Abstract: Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17-29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 +/- 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 +/- 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 +/- 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 +/- 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 +/- 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohn's disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23933821
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1433-0407
    Keywords: Schlüsselwörter Entwicklungspsychopathologie ; Geschlechterunterschiede ; Kontinuität und Wandel von Verhalten ; Klassifikation ; Prognose und Prädiktion ; Implikationen für Diagnostik und Therapie ; Key words Developmental psychopathology ; Sex differences ; Continuity and change of behavior ; Classification ; Prognosis and prediction ; Implications for diagnostics and therapy
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Description / Table of Contents: Summary Although the developmental perspective is not new, developmental psychopathology has only recently become an interdisciplinary and integrative field of research for the understanding of normal and pathological development as well. There have been new findings during the past two decades in several areas: the individual and sex differences of certain disorders, continuity and change of behavior, risk factors and protective factors as well as turning points in development. Also, the current classification systems include the developmental perspective on a special axis devoted to developmental disorders. Nevertheless, there are still huge gaps in our knowledge in nearly all relevant fields that need to be filled in the future. On the other hand, the available knowledge has not yet been applied to diagnostic procedures, to therapeutic interventions, or to preventive measures.
    Notes: Zusammenfassung Obwohl die Entwicklungsperspektive nicht neu ist, ist die Entwicklungspsychopathologie erst vor kurzem zu einem interdisziplinären und integrativen Forschungsgebiet geworden, das zum Verständnis sowohl normaler als auch pathologischer Entwicklungsprozesse beitragen kann. In den letzten beiden Jahrzehnten sind in verschiedener Hinsicht neue Erkenntnisse erzielt worden: Im Hinblick auf individuelle und Geschlechterunterschiede bei bestimmten Störungen, im Hinblick auf Kontinuität und Wandel von Verhalten, auf Risikofaktoren und protektive Faktoren und auf Wendepunkte im Entwicklungsverlauf. Auch die gültigen Klassifikationssysteme beziehen die Entwicklungsperspektive auf einer gesonderten Achse ein, die den Entwicklungsstörungen gewidmet ist. Dennoch verbleiben immense Wissenslücken auf fast allen wichtigen Gebieten, die in der Zukunft zu schließen sein werden. Auf der anderen Seite hat aber das verfügbare Wissen noch nicht umfassend Eingang gefunden in das diagnostische und therapeutische Vorgehen und in präventive Maßnahmen.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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