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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-04-24
    Description: The elucidation of breast cancer subgroups and their molecular drivers requires integrated views of the genome and transcriptome from representative numbers of patients. We present an integrated analysis of copy number and gene expression in a discovery and validation set of 997 and 995 primary breast tumours, respectively, with long-term clinical follow-up. Inherited variants (copy number variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms) and acquired somatic copy number aberrations (CNAs) were associated with expression in ~40% of genes, with the landscape dominated by cis- and trans-acting CNAs. By delineating expression outlier genes driven in cis by CNAs, we identified putative cancer genes, including deletions in PPP2R2A, MTAP and MAP2K4. Unsupervised analysis of paired DNA-RNA profiles revealed novel subgroups with distinct clinical outcomes, which reproduced in the validation cohort. These include a high-risk, oestrogen-receptor-positive 11q13/14 cis-acting subgroup and a favourable prognosis subgroup devoid of CNAs. Trans-acting aberration hotspots were found to modulate subgroup-specific gene networks, including a TCR deletion-mediated adaptive immune response in the 'CNA-devoid' subgroup and a basal-specific chromosome 5 deletion-associated mitotic network. Our results provide a novel molecular stratification of the breast cancer population, derived from the impact of somatic CNAs on the transcriptome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3440846/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3440846/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Curtis, Christina -- Shah, Sohrab P -- Chin, Suet-Feung -- Turashvili, Gulisa -- Rueda, Oscar M -- Dunning, Mark J -- Speed, Doug -- Lynch, Andy G -- Samarajiwa, Shamith -- Yuan, Yinyin -- Graf, Stefan -- Ha, Gavin -- Haffari, Gholamreza -- Bashashati, Ali -- Russell, Roslin -- McKinney, Steven -- METABRIC Group -- Langerod, Anita -- Green, Andrew -- Provenzano, Elena -- Wishart, Gordon -- Pinder, Sarah -- Watson, Peter -- Markowetz, Florian -- Murphy, Leigh -- Ellis, Ian -- Purushotham, Arnie -- Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise -- Brenton, James D -- Tavare, Simon -- Caldas, Carlos -- Aparicio, Samuel -- A7199/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- P50HG02790/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 18;486(7403):346-52. doi: 10.1038/nature10983.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2XZ, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22522925" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Breast Neoplasms/classification/diagnosis/*genetics/*pathology ; DNA Copy Number Variations/*genetics ; Female ; *Gene Expression Profiling ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Regulatory Networks/genetics ; Genes, Neoplasm/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Humans ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; MAP Kinase Kinase 4/genetics ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Phosphatase 2/genetics ; Treatment Outcome
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-04-13
    Description: Primary triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), a tumour type defined by lack of oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and ERBB2 gene amplification, represent approximately 16% of all breast cancers. Here we show in 104 TNBC cases that at the time of diagnosis these cancers exhibit a wide and continuous spectrum of genomic evolution, with some having only a handful of coding somatic aberrations in a few pathways, whereas others contain hundreds of coding somatic mutations. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) revealed that only approximately 36% of mutations are expressed. Using deep re-sequencing measurements of allelic abundance for 2,414 somatic mutations, we determine for the first time-to our knowledge-in an epithelial tumour subtype, the relative abundance of clonal frequencies among cases representative of the population. We show that TNBCs vary widely in their clonal frequencies at the time of diagnosis, with the basal subtype of TNBC showing more variation than non-basal TNBC. Although p53 (also known as TP53), PIK3CA and PTEN somatic mutations seem to be clonally dominant compared to other genes, in some tumours their clonal frequencies are incompatible with founder status. Mutations in cytoskeletal, cell shape and motility proteins occurred at lower clonal frequencies, suggesting that they occurred later during tumour progression. Taken together, our results show that understanding the biology and therapeutic responses of patients with TNBC will require the determination of individual tumour clonal genotypes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863681/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863681/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Shah, Sohrab P -- Roth, Andrew -- Goya, Rodrigo -- Oloumi, Arusha -- Ha, Gavin -- Zhao, Yongjun -- Turashvili, Gulisa -- Ding, Jiarui -- Tse, Kane -- Haffari, Gholamreza -- Bashashati, Ali -- Prentice, Leah M -- Khattra, Jaswinder -- Burleigh, Angela -- Yap, Damian -- Bernard, Virginie -- McPherson, Andrew -- Shumansky, Karey -- Crisan, Anamaria -- Giuliany, Ryan -- Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza -- Rosner, Jamie -- Lai, Daniel -- Birol, Inanc -- Varhol, Richard -- Tam, Angela -- Dhalla, Noreen -- Zeng, Thomas -- Ma, Kevin -- Chan, Simon K -- Griffith, Malachi -- Moradian, Annie -- Cheng, S-W Grace -- Morin, Gregg B -- Watson, Peter -- Gelmon, Karen -- Chia, Stephen -- Chin, Suet-Feung -- Curtis, Christina -- Rueda, Oscar M -- Pharoah, Paul D -- Damaraju, Sambasivarao -- Mackey, John -- Hoon, Kelly -- Harkins, Timothy -- Tadigotla, Vasisht -- Sigaroudinia, Mahvash -- Gascard, Philippe -- Tlsty, Thea -- Costello, Joseph F -- Meyer, Irmtraud M -- Eaves, Connie J -- Wasserman, Wyeth W -- Jones, Steven -- Huntsman, David -- Hirst, Martin -- Caldas, Carlos -- Marra, Marco A -- Aparicio, Samuel -- 5U01ES017154-02/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084875/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM084875/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 4;486(7403):395-9. doi: 10.1038/nature10933.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. sshah@bccrc.ca〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495314" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis/*genetics/*pathology ; Clone Cells/metabolism/pathology ; DNA Copy Number Variations/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Disease Progression ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Genotype ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Humans ; INDEL Mutation/genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Point Mutation/genetics ; Precision Medicine ; Reproducibility of Results ; Sequence Analysis, RNA
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-12-04
    Description: Human cancers, including breast cancers, comprise clones differing in mutation content. Clones evolve dynamically in space and time following principles of Darwinian evolution, underpinning important emergent features such as drug resistance and metastasis. Human breast cancer xenoengraftment is used as a means of capturing and studying tumour biology, and breast tumour xenografts are generally assumed to be reasonable models of the originating tumours. However, the consequences and reproducibility of engraftment and propagation on the genomic clonal architecture of tumours have not been systematically examined at single-cell resolution. Here we show, using deep-genome and single-cell sequencing methods, the clonal dynamics of initial engraftment and subsequent serial propagation of primary and metastatic human breast cancers in immunodeficient mice. In all 15 cases examined, clonal selection on engraftment was observed in both primary and metastatic breast tumours, varying in degree from extreme selective engraftment of minor (〈5% of starting population) clones to moderate, polyclonal engraftment. Furthermore, ongoing clonal dynamics during serial passaging is a feature of tumours experiencing modest initial selection. Through single-cell sequencing, we show that major mutation clusters estimated from tumour population sequencing relate predictably to the most abundant clonal genotypes, even in clonally complex and rapidly evolving cases. Finally, we show that similar clonal expansion patterns can emerge in independent grafts of the same starting tumour population, indicating that genomic aberrations can be reproducible determinants of evolutionary trajectories. Our results show that measurement of genomically defined clonal population dynamics will be highly informative for functional studies using patient-derived breast cancer xenoengraftment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Eirew, Peter -- Steif, Adi -- Khattra, Jaswinder -- Ha, Gavin -- Yap, Damian -- Farahani, Hossein -- Gelmon, Karen -- Chia, Stephen -- Mar, Colin -- Wan, Adrian -- Laks, Emma -- Biele, Justina -- Shumansky, Karey -- Rosner, Jamie -- McPherson, Andrew -- Nielsen, Cydney -- Roth, Andrew J L -- Lefebvre, Calvin -- Bashashati, Ali -- de Souza, Camila -- Siu, Celia -- Aniba, Radhouane -- Brimhall, Jazmine -- Oloumi, Arusha -- Osako, Tomo -- Bruna, Alejandra -- Sandoval, Jose L -- Algara, Teresa -- Greenwood, Wendy -- Leung, Kaston -- Cheng, Hongwei -- Xue, Hui -- Wang, Yuzhuo -- Lin, Dong -- Mungall, Andrew J -- Moore, Richard -- Zhao, Yongjun -- Lorette, Julie -- Nguyen, Long -- Huntsman, David -- Eaves, Connie J -- Hansen, Carl -- Marra, Marco A -- Caldas, Carlos -- Shah, Sohrab P -- Aparicio, Samuel -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):422-6. doi: 10.1038/nature13952. Epub 2014 Nov 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. ; Department of Medical Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada. ; Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2XZ, UK [2] Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute, University of Cambridge, Li Ka Shing Centre, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. ; 1] Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada [2] Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1, Canada. ; 1] Department of Experimental Therapeutics, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver General Hospital and Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1M9, Canada. ; Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada. ; 1] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada [2] Terry Fox Laboratory, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada [2] Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada. ; 1] Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada [3] Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Department of Molecular Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada [3] Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [4] Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25470049" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology/secondary ; Clone Cells/*metabolism/*pathology ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Genotype ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Humans ; Mice ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; *Single-Cell Analysis ; Time Factors ; Transplantation, Heterologous ; *Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays/methods
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-04-28
    Description: Whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA and circulating tumor cells in multiple myeloma Whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA and circulating tumor cells in multiple myeloma, Published online: 27 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04001-5 Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) enables characterization of a patient’s cancer. Here, the authors analyse CTCs, cfDNA, and tumor biopsies from multiple myeloma patients to show these approaches are complementary for mutation detection, together enabling a greater fraction of patient tumors to be profiled.
    Electronic ISSN: 2041-1723
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1399-3038
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Thromboxane A2 and its receptor (TBXA2R) are involved in the constriction of vascular and respiratory smooth muscles. The T924C polymorphism in the TBXA2R gene was recently found to be associated with asthma in Japanese adults but not in children. Its relationship with atopy or asthma severity in children has not been defined. To investigate this further, we first assessed the severity of asthma in Chinese children using a standardized questionnaire modified from the Disease Severity Score and spirometric evaluation. Then, peripheral blood was analyzed for serum total and aeroallergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, and TBXA2R T924C genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. One-hundred and fifty three asthmatic patients and 57 control children were recruited, of respective mean ages 9.9 and 11.0 years (p = 0.07). The mean logarithmic serum total IgE concentration was 2.57 and 2.09, respectively, for the asthmatic group and control group (p 〈 0.0001). Atopy was detected in 132 (86%) asthmatics and 33 (58%) controls. A significant association was observed between T924C and the diagnosis of atopic asthma (p = 0.044; odds ratio: 1.84). In addition, those asthmatics homozygous for the mutant allele in T924C had a lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (p = 0.032 and 0.002, respectively). Among our asthmatic patients, the TBXA2R T924C polymorphism correlated with the concentration of cat-specific IgE in serum (p = 0.046). Nonetheless, this gene marker did not show an association with the serum total IgE concentration or any clinical indicator of asthma severity. In conclusion, our results suggest that the T924C marker in the TBXA2R gene is associated, in Chinese children, with an increased susceptibility of developing atopic asthma. This marker is also associated with the extent of allergic sensitization to cat, as well as with reduced FEV1 and FVC values.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1365-2222
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background Interleukin (IL)-13 is an important cytokine secreted from type 2 helper T lymphocytes. It is essential for modulating IgE synthesis by human B cells. Previous studies showed that polymorphisms in the IL-13 gene were associated with serum total IgE or allergic asthma. The relationship of this marker with sensitization to individual aeroallergens has not been evaluated.Objective We tested whether a polymorphism in the coding region of the IL-13 gene is associated with asthma and atopy in asthmatic children in Hong Kong.Methods We used restriction fragment length polymorphism to detect R130Q genotype in Chinese children with asthma and control subjects. Serum total IgE was measured by microparticle immunoassay and specific IgE to common aeroallergens was measured using fluorescent enzyme immunoassay. Pulmonary function studies were performed using spirometry.Results One hundred and fifty-seven patients and 54 control children were recruited. Their mean serum total IgE concentrations were 994 kIU/L and 473 kIU/L, respectively (P 〈 0.0001). Atopy as defined by ≥ 1 positive RAST was found in 141 patients and 32 control children. The GlnGln form of the R130Q polymorphism in the IL-13 gene was associated with serum total IgE (P = 0.005) as well as specific IgE to Der p 1 (P = 0.021), mixed cockroaches (P = 0.03) and dog (P = 0.003) but not with physician-diagnosed asthma (P = 0.621). In addition, the R130Q polymorphism did not correlate with subjective or objective indicators of asthma severity in our patients.Conclusion Our results suggest that the R130Q polymorphism of the IL-13 gene is associated with elevated serum total and allergen-specific IgE but not asthma in Chinese children.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1365-2826
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: In the female rat, the integrity of the ventral noradrenergic bundle (VNAB) is necessary to carry stimuli from the uterine cervix and vagina to brain areas involved in mating-induced pseudopregnancy. Because adrenal hormones are known to alter noradrenergic function, we examined whether adrenalectomy altered mating-induced Fos expression in the A1 and A2 noradrenergic cell groups that project through the VNAB. Ovariectomized females were adrenalectomized (ADX) or sham-operated (Sham) and, 2 weeks after surgery, were given oestrogen and progesterone and mated. They received 15 intromissions, five intromissions or 15 mounts-without-intromission (mounts-only) from a male. Two hours after mating, rats were perfused and brains were collected; controls were perfused after being taken directly from their home cage. After immunocytochemical staining, Fos-immunoreactive (Fos-IR) and dopamine-β-hydroxylase-immunoreactive (DBH-IR) cells and the percentage of DBH cells that were labelled with Fos (% DBH/Fos) were counted. In the A1 area, Fos-IR and percentage DBH/Fos were not affected by adrenalectomy. Although an overall effect of mating treatment was found for both measures, no specific mating treatment increased labelled cells above home cage levels. In the caudal, middle and rostral A2, 15 intromissions induced a significant increase in Fos-IR in Sham females above all other groups and a higher percentage of DBH/Fos in the middle and rostral A2 areas. ADX females showed no rise in either Fos-IR or percentage DBH/Fos after 15 intromissions. However, in the middle and rostral A2, ADX females showed significantly increased Fos-IR and percentage DBH/Fos after mounts-only treatment above Sham mounts-only females and all other ADX groups. These results demonstrate that adrenal hormones suppress activation of A2 cells to mounts-only stimuli but contribute to A2 activation in response to intromissions from males. The latter effect may result from stress associated with receipt of vaginocervical stimulation during mating.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-03-06
    Description: Background/Aim: Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer type in women, and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an extremely aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor prognosis rates. The present study investigated the antitumor effect of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitor in combination with the tankyrase-1 (TNKS1) inhibitor on TNBC cells. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the antitumor effects of combination therapy with PLK1 and TNKS1 inhibitor using cell viability analysis, apoptosis assay and transwell assay for cell invasion and migration in TNBC cells. Results: Combination treatment with PLK1 and TNKS1 inhibitors not only inhibited the invasion and migration capacity of TNBC cells, but also increased the apoptosis and cell death of TNBC cells. The viability of TNBC cells with low expression of β-catenin and high expression of PLK1 was not affected by treatment with PLK1 inhibitor. However, the combination treatment with the TNKS1 inhibitor significantly decreased cell invasion and migration and increased apoptosis. Conclusion: Combination therapy of PLK1 and TNKS1 inhibitors may improve the therapeutic efficacy of the current treatment for TNBC.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
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