Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2016-03-05
    Description: The envelope glycoprotein trimer (Env) on the surface of HIV-1 recognizes CD4(+) T cells and mediates viral entry. During this process, Env undergoes substantial conformational rearrangements, making it difficult to study in its native state. Soluble stabilized trimers have provided valuable insights into the Env structure, but they lack the hydrophobic membrane proximal external region (MPER, an important target of broadly neutralizing antibodies), the transmembrane domain, and the cytoplasmic tail. Here we present (i) a cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a clade B virus Env, which lacks only the cytoplasmic tail and is stabilized by the broadly neutralizing antibody PGT151, at a resolution of 4.2 angstroms and (ii) a reconstruction of this form of Env in complex with PGT151 and MPER-targeting antibody 10E8 at a resolution of 8.8 angstroms. These structures provide new insights into the wild-type Env structure.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lee, Jeong Hyun -- Ozorowski, Gabriel -- Ward, Andrew B -- UM1 AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 4;351(6277):1043-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aad2450.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26941313" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-05-14
    Description: The HIV-1 fusion peptide, comprising 15 to 20 hydrophobic residues at the N terminus of the Env-gp41 subunit, is a critical component of the virus-cell entry machinery. Here, we report the identification of a neutralizing antibody, N123-VRC34.01, which targets the fusion peptide and blocks viral entry by inhibiting conformational changes in gp120 and gp41 subunits of Env required for entry. Crystal structures of N123-VRC34.01 liganded to the fusion peptide, and to the full Env trimer, revealed an epitope consisting of the N-terminal eight residues of the gp41 fusion peptide and glycan N88 of gp120, and molecular dynamics showed that the N-terminal portion of the fusion peptide can be solvent-exposed. These results reveal the fusion peptide to be a neutralizing antibody epitope and thus a target for vaccine design.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kong, Rui -- Xu, Kai -- Zhou, Tongqing -- Acharya, Priyamvada -- Lemmin, Thomas -- Liu, Kevin -- Ozorowski, Gabriel -- Soto, Cinque -- Taft, Justin D -- Bailer, Robert T -- Cale, Evan M -- Chen, Lei -- Choi, Chang W -- Chuang, Gwo-Yu -- Doria-Rose, Nicole A -- Druz, Aliaksandr -- Georgiev, Ivelin S -- Gorman, Jason -- Huang, Jinghe -- Joyce, M Gordon -- Louder, Mark K -- Ma, Xiaochu -- McKee, Krisha -- O'Dell, Sijy -- Pancera, Marie -- Yang, Yongping -- Blanchard, Scott C -- Mothes, Walther -- Burton, Dennis R -- Koff, Wayne C -- Connors, Mark -- Ward, Andrew B -- Kwong, Peter D -- Mascola, John R -- P01GM56550/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM079238/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM116654/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 May 13;352(6287):828-33. doi: 10.1126/science.aae0474.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ; Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; HIV-Specific Immunity Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. ; Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA. ; Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Center, Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Boston, MA 02142, USA. ; International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, NY 10038, USA. ; Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. pdkwong@nih.gov jmascola@nih.gov.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27174988" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-06-20
    Description: A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505 SOSIP.664, induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched tier 2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (tier 1) viruses. Tier 2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas tier 1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous tier 2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for the development of HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498988/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498988/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sanders, Rogier W -- van Gils, Marit J -- Derking, Ronald -- Sok, Devin -- Ketas, Thomas J -- Burger, Judith A -- Ozorowski, Gabriel -- Cupo, Albert -- Simonich, Cassandra -- Goo, Leslie -- Arendt, Heather -- Kim, Helen J -- Lee, Jeong Hyun -- Pugach, Pavel -- Williams, Melissa -- Debnath, Gargi -- Moldt, Brian -- van Breemen, Marielle J -- Isik, Gozde -- Medina-Ramirez, Max -- Back, Jaap Willem -- Koff, Wayne C -- Julien, Jean-Philippe -- Rakasz, Eva G -- Seaman, Michael S -- Guttman, Miklos -- Lee, Kelly K -- Klasse, Per Johan -- LaBranche, Celia -- Schief, William R -- Wilson, Ian A -- Overbaugh, Julie -- Burton, Dennis R -- Ward, Andrew B -- Montefiori, David C -- Dean, Hansi -- Moore, John P -- 280829/European Research Council/International -- HHSN27201100016C/PHS HHS/ -- P01 AI082362/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P51 OD011106/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P51OD011106/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI076105/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI084817/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI036082/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R56 AI084817/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007266/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- UM1 AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 10;349(6244):aac4223. doi: 10.1126/science.aac4223. Epub 2015 Jun 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Department of Medical Microbiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands. jpm2003@med.cornell.edu rws2002@med.cornell.edu. ; Department of Medical Microbiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands. ; Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA. ; International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; Division of Human Biology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA. ; International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, NY 10004, USA. ; Pepscan Therapeutics, 8243RC Lelystad, Netherlands. ; Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53715, USA. ; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ; Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ; Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. ; Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, NY 10004, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ; International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA. jpm2003@med.cornell.edu rws2002@med.cornell.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26089353" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: AIDS Vaccines/*immunology ; Animals ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/*immunology ; Cross Reactions ; Epitopes/immunology ; HIV Antibodies/*immunology ; HIV Infections/*prevention & control ; HIV-1/*immunology ; Humans ; Macaca ; Protein Engineering ; Protein Multimerization ; Rabbits ; Recombinant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/immunology ; env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/chemistry/genetics/*immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-11-22
    Description: Overcoming envelope metastability is crucial to trimer-based HIV-1 vaccine design. Here, we present a coherent vaccine strategy by minimizing metastability. For 10 strains across five clades, we demonstrate that the gp41 ectodomain (gp41 ECTO ) is the main source of envelope metastability by replacing wild-type gp41 ECTO with BG505 gp41 ECTO of the uncleaved prefusion-optimized (UFO) design. These gp41 ECTO -swapped trimers can be produced in CHO cells with high yield and high purity. The crystal structure of a gp41 ECTO -swapped trimer elucidates how a neutralization-resistant tier 3 virus evades antibody recognition of the V2 apex. UFO trimers of transmitted/founder viruses and UFO trimers containing a consensus-based ancestral gp41 ECTO suggest an evolutionary root of metastability. The gp41 ECTO -stabilized trimers can be readily displayed on 24- and 60-meric nanoparticles, with incorporation of additional T cell help illustrated for a hyperstable 60-mer, I3-01. In mice and rabbits, these gp140 nanoparticles induced tier 2 neutralizing antibody responses more effectively than soluble trimers.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-06-14
    Description: Native-like, soluble, recombinant SOSIP trimers of various designs and based on several env genes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are being tested as immunogens in different animal models. These experiments almost always involve coformulating the trimers with an adjuvant to boost the magnitude of the immune responses. One factor relevant to the choice of an adjuvant is that it should not physically damage the immunogen or impede its ability to present relevant epitopes. As examples, an adjuvant formulation that includes harsh detergents could disrupt the structural integrity of a trimer, and any charged compounds in the formulation could bind to countercharged regions of the trimer and physically occlude nearby epitopes. While a few adjuvants have been tested for their potential effects on SOSIP trimers in vitro , there has been no systematic study. Here, we have assessed how nine different adjuvants of various compositions affect SOSIP trimers of the BG505 and B41 genotypes. We used negative-stain electron microscopy, thermal denaturation, and gel electrophoresis to evaluate effects on trimer integrity and immunoassays to measure effects on the presentation of various epitopes. We conclude that most of the tested adjuvants are benign from these perspectives, but some raise grounds for concern. An acidified alum formulation is highly disruptive to trimer integrity, and a DNA-based polyanionic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant binds to trimers and occludes the trimer apex epitope for the PGT145 neutralizing antibody. The methods described here should be generalizable to protein subunit vaccines targeting various pathogens. IMPORTANCE Adjuvant formulations increase the magnitude of immune responses to vaccine antigens. They are critically important for formulation of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) vaccines intended to induce antibody production, as Env proteins are otherwise only very weakly immunogenic. The HIV-1 vaccine field now uses the well-defined structures of trimeric Env glycoproteins, like SOSIPs, to present multiple known epitopes for broad and potent neutralizing human antibodies in a native-like conformation. Successful adjuvant formulations must not disrupt how the trimers are folded, as that could adversely affect their performance as immunogens. We studied whether the various adjuvants most commonly used in animal experiments affect the integrity of two different SOSIP trimers in vitro . Most adjuvant classes are not problematic, but an aluminum sulfate formulation is highly damaging, as it exposes trimers to acidic pH and a nucleic acid-based adjuvant can bind to the trimer and block access to a key neutralizing epitope.
    Print ISSN: 0022-538X
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-5514
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...