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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-07-19
    Description: Binding of the glucagon peptide to the glucagon receptor (GCGR) triggers the release of glucose from the liver during fasting; thus GCGR plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. Here we report the crystal structure of the seven transmembrane helical domain of human GCGR at 3.4 A resolution, complemented by extensive site-specific mutagenesis, and a hybrid model of glucagon bound to GCGR to understand the molecular recognition of the receptor for its native ligand. Beyond the shared seven transmembrane fold, the GCGR transmembrane domain deviates from class A G-protein-coupled receptors with a large ligand-binding pocket and the first transmembrane helix having a 'stalk' region that extends three alpha-helical turns above the plane of the membrane. The stalk positions the extracellular domain (~12 kilodaltons) relative to the membrane to form the glucagon-binding site that captures the peptide and facilitates the insertion of glucagon's amino terminus into the seven transmembrane domain.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820480/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820480/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Siu, Fai Yiu -- He, Min -- de Graaf, Chris -- Han, Gye Won -- Yang, Dehua -- Zhang, Zhiyun -- Zhou, Caihong -- Xu, Qingping -- Wacker, Daniel -- Joseph, Jeremiah S -- Liu, Wei -- Lau, Jesper -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Wang, Ming-Wei -- Stevens, Raymond C -- F32 DK088392/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094586/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jul 25;499(7459):444-9. doi: 10.1038/nature12393. Epub 2013 Jul 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23863937" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Cell Membrane/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Glucagon/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Protein Binding ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptors, CXCR4/chemistry/classification ; Receptors, Glucagon/*chemistry/*classification/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: P2Y receptors (P2YRs), a family of purinergic G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), are activated by extracellular nucleotides. There are a total of eight distinct functional P2YRs expressed in human, which are subdivided into P2Y1-like receptors and P2Y12-like receptors. Their ligands are generally charged molecules with relatively low bioavailability and stability in vivo, which limits our understanding of this receptor family. P2Y12R regulates platelet activation and thrombus formation, and several antithrombotic drugs targeting P2Y12R--including the prodrugs clopidogrel (Plavix) and prasugrel (Effient) that are metabolized and bind covalently, and the nucleoside analogue ticagrelor (Brilinta) that acts directly on the receptor--have been approved for the prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction. However, limitations of these drugs (for example, a very long half-life of clopidogrel action and a characteristic adverse effect profile of ticagrelor) suggest that there is an unfulfilled medical need for developing a new generation of P2Y12R inhibitors. Here we report the 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of human P2Y12R in complex with a non-nucleotide reversible antagonist, AZD1283. The structure reveals a distinct straight conformation of helix V, which sets P2Y12R apart from all other known class A GPCR structures. With AZD1283 bound, the highly conserved disulphide bridge in GPCRs between helix III and extracellular loop 2 is not observed and appears to be dynamic. Along with the details of the AZD1283-binding site, analysis of the extracellular interface reveals an adjacent ligand-binding region and suggests that both pockets could be required for dinucleotide binding. The structure provides essential insights for the development of improved P2Y12R ligands and allosteric modulators as drug candidates.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4174307/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4174307/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Kaihua -- Zhang, Jin -- Gao, Zhan-Guo -- Zhang, Dandan -- Zhu, Lan -- Han, Gye Won -- Moss, Steven M -- Paoletta, Silvia -- Kiselev, Evgeny -- Lu, Weizhen -- Fenalti, Gustavo -- Zhang, Wenru -- Muller, Christa E -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Jacobson, Kenneth A -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Wu, Beili -- Zhao, Qiang -- R01 AI100604/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Z99 DK999999/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA DK031116-26/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA DK031126-07/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 1;509(7498):115-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13083. Epub 2014 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China [2]. ; Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; PharmaCenter Bonn, Pharmaceutical Institute, Pharmaceutical Chemistry I, An der Immenburg 4, D-53121 Bonn, Germany. ; Drug Discovery and Design Center, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China. ; 1] Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 99 Haike Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670650" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/metabolism ; Fibrinolytic Agents/*chemistry ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Docking Simulation ; Niacin/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/chemistry/metabolism ; Receptors, Purinergic P2Y12/*chemistry/metabolism ; Sulfonamides/*chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-02-22
    Description: The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P(1)-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P(1), resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3338336/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3338336/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hanson, Michael A -- Roth, Christopher B -- Jo, Euijung -- Griffith, Mark T -- Scott, Fiona L -- Reinhart, Greg -- Desale, Hans -- Clemons, Bryan -- Cahalan, Stuart M -- Schuerer, Stephan C -- Sanna, M Germana -- Han, Gye Won -- Kuhn, Peter -- Rosen, Hugh -- Stevens, Raymond C -- AI055509/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI074564/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197-08/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI055509/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI055509-04/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI074564/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI074564-04/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH084512/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH084512-04/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Feb 17;335(6070):851-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1215904.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Receptos, 10835 Road to the Cure, San Diego, CA 92121, USA. mhanson@receptos.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22344443" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Anilides/chemistry ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Models, Molecular ; Muramidase/chemistry ; Mutagenesis ; Organophosphonates/chemistry ; Protein Conformation ; Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/agonists/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/genetics ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-05-03
    Description: The smoothened (SMO) receptor, a key signal transducer in the hedgehog signalling pathway, is responsible for the maintenance of normal embryonic development and is implicated in carcinogenesis. It is classified as a class frizzled (class F) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), although the canonical hedgehog signalling pathway involves the GLI transcription factors and the sequence similarity with class A GPCRs is less than 10%. Here we report the crystal structure of the transmembrane domain of the human SMO receptor bound to the small-molecule antagonist LY2940680 at 2.5 A resolution. Although the SMO receptor shares the seven-transmembrane helical fold, most of the conserved motifs for class A GPCRs are absent, and the structure reveals an unusually complex arrangement of long extracellular loops stabilized by four disulphide bonds. The ligand binds at the extracellular end of the seven-transmembrane-helix bundle and forms extensive contacts with the loops.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3657389/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3657389/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Chong -- Wu, Huixian -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Han, Gye Won -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Liu, Wei -- Siu, Fai Yiu -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- F32 DK088392/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA27170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01MH61887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH82441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 May 16;497(7449):338-43. doi: 10.1038/nature12167. Epub 2013 May 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23636324" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antineoplastic Agents/*chemistry/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry ; Frizzled Receptors/chemistry/classification ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phthalazines/*chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/*chemistry/classification/metabolism ; Structural Homology, Protein
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a approximately 20 degrees rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Yanyong -- Zhou, X Edward -- Gao, Xiang -- He, Yuanzheng -- Liu, Wei -- Ishchenko, Andrii -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Yefanov, Oleksandr -- Han, Gye Won -- Xu, Qingping -- de Waal, Parker W -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Zhang, Chenghai -- Moeller, Arne -- West, Graham M -- Pascal, Bruce D -- Van Eps, Ned -- Caro, Lydia N -- Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A -- Lee, Regina J -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- Gu, Xin -- Pal, Kuntal -- Ma, Jinming -- Zhi, Xiaoyong -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Williams, Garth J -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Gati, Cornelius -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Wang, Dingjie -- James, Daniel -- Basu, Shibom -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Conrad, Chelsie E -- Coe, Jesse -- Liu, Haiguang -- Lisova, Stella -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Fromme, Raimund -- Jiang, Yi -- Tan, Minjia -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Li, Jun -- Wang, Meitian -- Zheng, Zhong -- Li, Dianfan -- Howe, Nicole -- Zhao, Yingming -- Standfuss, Jorg -- Diederichs, Kay -- Dong, Yuhui -- Potter, Clinton S -- Carragher, Bridget -- Caffrey, Martin -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Chapman, Henry N -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Ernst, Oliver P -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Gurevich, Vsevolod V -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Hubbell, Wayne L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- EY005216/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM077561/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM097463/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM104212/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM108635/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30EY000331/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103393/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK066202/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM087413/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM109955/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094586/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094599/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):561-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14656. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Joint Center for Structural Genomics, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; The National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, New York 10027, USA. ; Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida 33458, USA. ; Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Haidian District, Beijing 10084, China. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; School of Medicine and School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA [2] Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Laboratory of Biomolecular Research at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biology, Universitat Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. ; Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. ; 1] Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [2] Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [2] Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [3] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 2F Building 6, 99 Haike Road, Pudong New District, Shanghai 201210, China. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200343" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arrestin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Lasers ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Multiprotein Complexes/biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Reproducibility of Results ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-03-31
    Description: In response to adenosine 5'-diphosphate, the P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) facilitates platelet aggregation, and thus serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Here we report the crystal structures of the human P2Y1R in complex with a nucleotide antagonist MRS2500 at 2.7 A resolution, and with a non-nucleotide antagonist BPTU at 2.2 A resolution. The structures reveal two distinct ligand-binding sites, providing atomic details of P2Y1R's unique ligand-binding modes. MRS2500 recognizes a binding site within the seven transmembrane bundle of P2Y1R, which is different in shape and location from the nucleotide binding site in the previously determined structure of P2Y12R, representative of another P2YR subfamily. BPTU binds to an allosteric pocket on the external receptor interface with the lipid bilayer, making it the first structurally characterized selective G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand located entirely outside of the helical bundle. These high-resolution insights into P2Y1R should enable discovery of new orthosteric and allosteric antithrombotic drugs with reduced adverse effects.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4408927/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4408927/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Dandan -- Gao, Zhan-Guo -- Zhang, Kaihua -- Kiselev, Evgeny -- Crane, Steven -- Wang, Jiang -- Paoletta, Silvia -- Yi, Cuiying -- Ma, Limin -- Zhang, Wenru -- Han, Gye Won -- Liu, Hong -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Jacobson, Kenneth A -- Zhao, Qiang -- Wu, Beili -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Z01 DK031116-21/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Z01DK031116-26/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- ZIA DK031116-26/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 16;520(7547):317-21. doi: 10.1038/nature14287. Epub 2015 Mar 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Bridge Institute, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Bridge Institute, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Drug Discovery and Design Center, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China. ; 1] Bridge Institute, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [2] Bridge Institute, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [3] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 99 Haike Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25822790" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine Diphosphate/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Deoxyadenine Nucleotides/*chemistry/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Conformation ; Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Receptors, Purinergic P2Y1/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Thionucleotides/chemistry/metabolism ; Uracil/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-03-12
    Description: Activation of G protein-coupled receptors upon agonist binding is a critical step in the signaling cascade for this family of cell surface proteins. We report the crystal structure of the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) bound to an agonist UK-432097 at 2.7 angstrom resolution. Relative to inactive, antagonist-bound A(2A)AR, the agonist-bound structure displays an outward tilt and rotation of the cytoplasmic half of helix VI, a movement of helix V, and an axial shift of helix III, resembling the changes associated with the active-state opsin structure. Additionally, a seesaw movement of helix VII and a shift of extracellular loop 3 are likely specific to A(2A)AR and its ligand. The results define the molecule UK-432097 as a "conformationally selective agonist" capable of receptor stabilization in a specific active-state configuration.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3086811/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3086811/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Xu, Fei -- Wu, Huixian -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Han, Gye Won -- Jacobson, Kenneth A -- Gao, Zhan-Guo -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- GM075915/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM089857/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Apr 15;332(6027):322-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1202793. Epub 2011 Mar 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21393508" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Adenosine A2 Receptor Agonists/chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Humans ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Opsins/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Receptor, Adenosine A2A/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Rhodopsin/chemistry/metabolism ; Triazines/chemistry/metabolism ; Triazoles/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-03-08
    Description: The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate induces modulatory actions via the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus), which are class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We determined the structure of the human mGlu1 receptor seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain bound to a negative allosteric modulator, FITM, at a resolution of 2.8 angstroms. The modulator binding site partially overlaps with the orthosteric binding sites of class A GPCRs but is more restricted than most other GPCRs. We observed a parallel 7TM dimer mediated by cholesterols, which suggests that signaling initiated by glutamate's interaction with the extracellular domain might be mediated via 7TM interactions within the full-length receptor dimer. A combination of crystallography, structure-activity relationships, mutagenesis, and full-length dimer modeling provides insights about the allosteric modulation and activation mechanism of class C GPCRs.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3991565/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3991565/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Huixian -- Wang, Chong -- Gregory, Karen J -- Han, Gye Won -- Cho, Hyekyung P -- Xia, Yan -- Niswender, Colleen M -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Meiler, Jens -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Conn, P Jeffrey -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK097376/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM080403/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM099842/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH062646/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH090192/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS031373/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R21 NS078262/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R37 NS031373/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Apr 4;344(6179):58-64. doi: 10.1126/science.1249489. Epub 2014 Mar 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24603153" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Allosteric Regulation ; Allosteric Site ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Benzamides/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Cholesterol ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Humans ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Structure-Activity Relationship ; Thiazoles/*chemistry/*metabolism
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    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-02-24
    Description: The fleeting lifetimes of the transition states (TSs) of chemical reactions make determination of their three-dimensional structures by diffraction methods a challenge. Here, we used packing interactions within the core of a protein to stabilize the planar TS conformation for rotation around the central carbon-carbon bond of biphenyl so that it could be directly observed by x-ray crystallography. The computational protein design software Rosetta was used to design a pocket within threonyl-transfer RNA synthetase from the thermophile Pyrococcus abyssi that forms complementary van der Waals interactions with a planar biphenyl. This latter moiety was introduced biosynthetically as the side chain of the noncanonical amino acid p-biphenylalanine. Through iterative rounds of computational design and structural analysis, we identified a protein in which the side chain of p-biphenylalanine is trapped in the energetically disfavored, coplanar conformation of the TS of the bond rotation reaction.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4581533/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4581533/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pearson, Aaron D -- Mills, Jeremy H -- Song, Yifan -- Nasertorabi, Fariborz -- Han, Gye Won -- Baker, David -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Schultz, Peter G -- 2 R01 GM097206-05/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM099210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- F32GM099210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM097206/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 20;347(6224):863-7. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa2424.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry and Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. schultz@scripps.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25700516" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alanine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry ; Archaeal Proteins/*chemistry ; Biphenyl Compounds/*chemistry ; Computer Simulation ; Computer-Aided Design ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Entropy ; Models, Chemical ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Pyrococcus abyssi/*enzymology ; Software ; Threonine-tRNA Ligase/*chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-03-23
    Description: Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and--in the case of kappa-opioid receptor (kappa-OR)--dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human kappa-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 A resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human kappa-OR. Modelling of other important kappa-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for kappa-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human kappa-OR.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356457/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356457/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Huixian -- Wacker, Daniel -- Mileni, Mauro -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Han, Gye Won -- Vardy, Eyal -- Liu, Wei -- Thompson, Aaron A -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Carroll, F Ivy -- Mascarella, S Wayne -- Westkaemper, Richard B -- Mosier, Philip D -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197-08/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA009045/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA009045-17/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017624/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Mar 21;485(7398):327-32. doi: 10.1038/nature10939.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22437504" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Diterpenes, Clerodane/chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Guanidines/chemistry ; Humans ; Models, Molecular ; Morphinans/chemistry ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Naltrexone/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Piperidines/*chemistry/pharmacology ; Protein Conformation ; Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2/chemistry ; Receptors, CXCR4/chemistry/metabolism ; Receptors, Opioid, kappa/*antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Structure-Activity Relationship ; Tetrahydroisoquinolines/*chemistry/pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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