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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: Purpose: The prognosis for patients with refractory soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) is dismal. Anlotinib has previously shown antitumor activity on STS in preclinical and phase I studies. Patients and Methods: Patients 18 years and older, progressing after anthracycline-based chemotherapy, naïve from angiogenesis inhibitors, with at least one measurable lesion according to RECIST 1.1, were enrolled. The main subtypes eligible were undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS), liposarcoma (LPS), leiomyosarcoma (LMS), synovial sarcoma (SS), fibrosarcoma (FS), alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS), and clear cell sarcoma (CCS). Participants were treated with anlotinib. The primary endpoint was progression-free rate at 12 weeks (PFR 12 weeks ). Results: A total of 166 patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the PFR 12 weeks was 68%, and objective response rate was 13% (95% confidence interval, 7.6%–18%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5.6 and 12 months, respectively. The PFR 12 weeks , median PFS and OS were: 58%, 4.1 and 11 months for UPS ( n = 19); 63%, 5.6 and 13 months for LPS ( n = 13); 75%, 11 and 15 months for LMS ( n = 26); 75%, 7.7 and 12 months for SS ( n = 47); 81%, 5.6 and 12 months for FS ( n = 18); 77%, 21 and not reached for ASPS ( n = 13); 54%, 11 and 16 months for CCS ( n = 7); and 44%, 2.8 and 8.8 months for other sarcoma ( n = 23), respectively. The most common clinically significant grade 3 or higher adverse events were hypertension (4.8%), triglyceride elevation (3.6%), and pneumothorax (2.4%). No treatment-related death occurred. Conclusions: Anlotinib showed antitumor activity in several STS entities. The toxicity was manageable. Clin Cancer Res; 24(21); 5233–8. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-02-16
    Description: Objectives To describe the clinical characteristics and management of patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in China. Design This was a multicentre, retrospective, observational study. Setting 13 teaching hospitals in northern, central and southern China from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014 Participants Information on hospitalised patients aged ≥14 years with radiographically confirmed pneumonia with illness onset in the community was collected using standard case report forms. Primary and secondary outcome measures Resource use for CAP management. Results Of 14 793 patients screened, 5828 with radiographically confirmed CAP were included in the final analysis. Low mortality risk patients with a CURB-65 score 0–1 and Pneumonia Severity Index risk class I–II accounted for 81.2% (4434/5594) and 56.4% (2034/3609) patients, respectively. 21.7% (1111/5130) patients had already achieved clinical stability on admission. A definite or probable pathogen was identified only in 12.7% (738/5828) patients. 40.9% (1575/3852) patients without pseudomonal infection risk factors received antimicrobial overtreatment regimens. The median duration between clinical stability to discharge was 5.0 days with 30-day mortality of 4.2%. Conclusions These data demonstrated the overuse of health resources in CAP management, indicating that there is potential for improvement and substantial savings to healthcare systems in China. Trial registration number NCT02489578 ; Results.
    Keywords: Open access, Infectious diseases
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 3
    Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancy in the developed world, accounting for 4% of the deaths from cancer in women(1). We performed a three-phase genome-wide association study of EOC survival in 8,951 individuals with EOC (cases) with available survival time data and a parallel association analysis of EOC susceptibility. Two SNPs at 19p13.11, rs8170 and rs2363956, showed evidence of association with survival (overall P = 5 x 10(-4) and P = 6 x 10(-4), respectively), but they did not replicate in phase 3. However, the same two SNPs demonstrated genome-wide significance for risk of serous EOC (P = 3 x 10(-9) and P = 4 x 10(-11), respectively). Expression analysis of candidate genes at this locus in ovarian tumors supported a role for the BRCA1-interacting gene C19orf62, also known as MERIT40, which contains rs8170, in EOC development
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20852633
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  • 4
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-07-23
    Description: A newly emerged H7N9 virus has caused 132 human infections with 37 deaths in China since 18 February 2013. Control measures in H7N9 virus-positive live poultry markets have reduced the number of infections; however, the character of the virus, including its pandemic potential, remains largely unknown. We systematically analyzed H7N9 viruses isolated from birds and humans. The viruses were genetically closely related and bound to human airway receptors; some also maintained the ability to bind to avian airway receptors. The viruses isolated from birds were nonpathogenic in chickens, ducks, and mice; however, the viruses isolated from humans caused up to 30% body weight loss in mice. Most importantly, one virus isolated from humans was highly transmissible in ferrets by respiratory droplet. Our findings indicate nothing to reduce the concern that these viruses can transmit between humans.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Qianyi -- Shi, Jianzhong -- Deng, Guohua -- Guo, Jing -- Zeng, Xianying -- He, Xijun -- Kong, Huihui -- Gu, Chunyang -- Li, Xuyong -- Liu, Jinxiong -- Wang, Guojun -- Chen, Yan -- Liu, Liling -- Liang, Libin -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Fan, Jun -- Wang, Jinliang -- Li, Wenhui -- Guan, Lizheng -- Li, Qimeng -- Yang, Huanliang -- Chen, Pucheng -- Jiang, Li -- Guan, Yuntao -- Xin, Xiaoguang -- Jiang, Yongping -- Tian, Guobin -- Wang, Xiurong -- Qiao, Chuanling -- Li, Chengjun -- Bu, Zhigao -- Chen, Hualan -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 26;341(6144):410-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1240532. Epub 2013 Jul 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001, People's Republic of China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23868922" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chickens/virology ; Columbidae/virology ; Ducks/virology ; Ferrets/*virology ; Genes, Viral ; Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Influenza A virus/genetics/isolation & purification/*pathogenicity/physiology ; Influenza in Birds/virology ; Influenza, Human/*transmission/*virology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation ; Orthomyxoviridae Infections/*transmission/*virology ; Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism ; Receptors, Virus/metabolism ; Respiratory System/*virology ; Virus Replication
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-12-17
    Description: Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4390078/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4390078/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Guojie -- Li, Cai -- Li, Qiye -- Li, Bo -- Larkin, Denis M -- Lee, Chul -- Storz, Jay F -- Antunes, Agostinho -- Greenwold, Matthew J -- Meredith, Robert W -- Odeen, Anders -- Cui, Jie -- Zhou, Qi -- Xu, Luohao -- Pan, Hailin -- Wang, Zongji -- Jin, Lijun -- Zhang, Pei -- Hu, Haofu -- Yang, Wei -- Hu, Jiang -- Xiao, Jin -- Yang, Zhikai -- Liu, Yang -- Xie, Qiaolin -- Yu, Hao -- Lian, Jinmin -- Wen, Ping -- Zhang, Fang -- Li, Hui -- Zeng, Yongli -- Xiong, Zijun -- Liu, Shiping -- Zhou, Long -- Huang, Zhiyong -- An, Na -- Wang, Jie -- Zheng, Qiumei -- Xiong, Yingqi -- Wang, Guangbiao -- Wang, Bo -- Wang, Jingjing -- Fan, Yu -- da Fonseca, Rute R -- Alfaro-Nunez, Alonzo -- Schubert, Mikkel -- Orlando, Ludovic -- Mourier, Tobias -- Howard, Jason T -- Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar -- Pfenning, Andreas -- Whitney, Osceola -- Rivas, Miriam V -- Hara, Erina -- Smith, Julia -- Farre, Marta -- Narayan, Jitendra -- Slavov, Gancho -- Romanov, Michael N -- Borges, Rui -- Machado, Joao Paulo -- Khan, Imran -- Springer, Mark S -- Gatesy, John -- Hoffmann, Federico G -- Opazo, Juan C -- Hastad, Olle -- Sawyer, Roger H -- Kim, Heebal -- Kim, Kyu-Won -- Kim, Hyeon Jeong -- Cho, Seoae -- Li, Ning -- Huang, Yinhua -- Bruford, Michael W -- Zhan, Xiangjiang -- Dixon, Andrew -- Bertelsen, Mads F -- Derryberry, Elizabeth -- Warren, Wesley -- Wilson, Richard K -- Li, Shengbin -- Ray, David A -- Green, Richard E -- O'Brien, Stephen J -- Griffin, Darren -- Johnson, Warren E -- Haussler, David -- Ryder, Oliver A -- Willerslev, Eske -- Graves, Gary R -- Alstrom, Per -- Fjeldsa, Jon -- Mindell, David P -- Edwards, Scott V -- Braun, Edward L -- Rahbek, Carsten -- Burt, David W -- Houde, Peter -- Zhang, Yong -- Yang, Huanming -- Wang, Jian -- Avian Genome Consortium -- Jarvis, Erich D -- Gilbert, M Thomas P -- Wang, Jun -- DP1 OD000448/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP1OD000448/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL087216/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Dec 12;346(6215):1311-20. doi: 10.1126/science.1251385. Epub 2014 Dec 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. Centre for Social Evolution, Department of Biology, Universitetsparken 15, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. zhanggj@genomics.cn jarvis@neuro.duke.edu mtpgilbert@gmail.com wangj@genomics.cn. ; China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark. ; China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. ; Royal Veterinary College, University of London, London, UK. ; Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea. Cho and Kim Genomics, Seoul National University Research Park, Seoul 151-919, Republic of Korea. ; School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA. ; Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia (CIMAR)/Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR), Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 177, 4050-123 Porto, Portugal. Departamento de Biologia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal. ; Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. ; Department of Biology and Molecular Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ 07043, USA. ; Department of Animal Ecology, Uppsala University, Norbyvagen 18D, S-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden. ; Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Charles Perkins Centre, School of Biological Sciences and Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore 169857, Singapore. ; Department of Integrative Biology University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. ; China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China. ; China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China. ; China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. BGI Education Center,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Shenzhen, 518083, China. ; Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Kunming, Yunnan 650223, China. ; Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark. ; Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. ; Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK. ; School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NJ, UK. ; Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia (CIMAR)/Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR), Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 177, 4050-123 Porto, Portugal. Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Universidade do Porto, Portugal. ; Department of Biology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA. Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA. ; Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile. ; Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Post Office Box 7011, S-750 07, Uppsala, Sweden. ; Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea. Cho and Kim Genomics, Seoul National University Research Park, Seoul 151-919, Republic of Korea. Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea. ; Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea. ; Cho and Kim Genomics, Seoul National University Research Park, Seoul 151-919, Republic of Korea. ; State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094, China. ; State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094, China. College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094, China. ; Organisms and Environment Division, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, Wales, UK. ; Organisms and Environment Division, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, Wales, UK. Key Lab of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 China. ; International Wildlife Consultants, Carmarthen SA33 5YL, Wales, UK. ; Centre for Zoo and Wild Animal Health, Copenhagen Zoo, Roskildevej 38, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark. ; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA. Museum of Natural Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. ; The Genome Institute at Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. ; College of Medicine and Forensics, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, 710061, China. ; Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA. ; Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. ; Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia. Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center 8000 N Ocean Drive, Dania, FL 33004, USA. ; Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, 1500 Remount Road, Front Royal, VA 22630, USA. ; Genetics Division, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, 15600 San Pasqual Valley Road, Escondido, CA 92027, USA. ; Department of Vertebrate Zoology, MRC-116, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Post Office Box 37012, Washington, DC 20013-7012, USA. Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. ; Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China. Swedish Species Information Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7007, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. ; Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. ; Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ; Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; Department of Biology and Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. ; Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. Imperial College London, Grand Challenges in Ecosystems and the Environment Initiative, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK. ; Division of Genetics and Genomics, The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The Roslin Institute Building, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Campus, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK. ; Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Box 30001 MSC 3AF, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA. ; China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai long, Taipa, Macau 999078, China. ; Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. zhanggj@genomics.cn jarvis@neuro.duke.edu mtpgilbert@gmail.com wangj@genomics.cn. ; Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark. Trace and Environmental DNA Laboratory, Department of Environment and Agriculture, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, 6102, Australia. zhanggj@genomics.cn jarvis@neuro.duke.edu mtpgilbert@gmail.com wangj@genomics.cn. ; China National GeneBank, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai long, Taipa, Macau 999078, China. Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Princess Al Jawhara Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. zhanggj@genomics.cn jarvis@neuro.duke.edu mtpgilbert@gmail.com wangj@genomics.cn.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25504712" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological ; Animals ; Biodiversity ; *Biological Evolution ; Birds/classification/*genetics/physiology ; Conserved Sequence ; Diet ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Flight, Animal ; Genes ; Genetic Variation ; *Genome ; Genomics ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Phylogeny ; Reproduction/genetics ; Selection, Genetic ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Synteny ; Vision, Ocular/genetics ; Vocalization, Animal
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-07-10
    Description: Macrophage activation by bacterial LPS leads to induction of a complex inflammatory gene program dependent on numerous transcription factor families. The transcription factor Ikaros has been shown to play a critical role in lymphoid cell development and differentiation; however, its function in myeloid cells and innate immune responses is less appreciated. Using comprehensive genomic analysis of Ikaros-dependent transcription, DNA binding, and chromatin accessibility, we describe unexpected dual repressor and activator functions for Ikaros in the LPS response of murine macrophages. Consistent with the described function of Ikaros as transcriptional repressor, Ikzf1 –/– macrophages showed enhanced induction for select responses. In contrast, we observed a dramatic defect in expression of many delayed LPS response genes, and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analyses support a key role for Ikaros in sustained NF-B chromatin binding. Decreased Ikaros expression in Ikzf1 +/– mice and human cells dampens these Ikaros-enhanced inflammatory responses, highlighting the importance of quantitative control of Ikaros protein level for its activator function. In the absence of Ikaros, a constitutively open chromatin state was coincident with dysregulation of LPS-induced chromatin remodeling, gene expression, and cytokine responses. Together, our data suggest a central role for Ikaros in coordinating the complex macrophage transcriptional program in response to pathogen challenge.
    Print ISSN: 0022-1767
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-6606
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-06-02
    Description: The myeloid differentiation antigen CD33 has long been exploited as a target for antibody-based therapeutic approaches in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Validation of this strategy was provided with the approval of the CD33-targeting antibody–drug conjugate (ADC) gemtuzumab ozogamicin in 2000; the clinical utility of this agent, however, has been hampered by safety concerns. Thus, the full potential of CD33-directed therapy in AML remains to be realized, and considerable interest exists in the design and development of more effective ADCs that confer high therapeutic indices and favorable tolerability profiles. Here, we describe the preclinical characterization of a novel CD33-targeting ADC, IMGN779, which utilizes a unique DNA-alkylating payload to achieve potent antitumor effects with good tolerability. The payload, DGN462, is prototypical of a novel class of purpose-created indolinobenzodiazeprine pseudodimers, termed IGNs. With low picomolar potency, IMGN779 reduced viability in a panel of AML cell lines in vitro . Mechanistically, the cytotoxic activity of IMGN779 involved DNA damage, cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis consistent with the mode of action of DGN462. Moreover, IMGN779 was highly active against patient-derived AML cells, including those with adverse molecular abnormalities, and sensitivity correlated to CD33 expression levels. In vivo , IMGN779 displayed robust antitumor efficacy in multiple AML xenograft and disseminated disease models, as evidenced by durable tumor regressions and prolonged survival. Taken together, these findings identify IMGN779 as a promising new candidate for evaluation as a novel therapeutic in AML. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(6); 1271–9. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1535-7163
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-8514
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 9
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2018-06-02
    Description: Three-dimensional topological (crystalline) insulators are materials with an insulating bulk but conducting surface states that are topologically protected by time-reversal (or spatial) symmetries. We extend the notion of three-dimensional topological insulators to systems that host no gapless surface states but exhibit topologically protected gapless hinge states. Their topological character is protected by spatiotemporal symmetries of which we present two cases: (i) Chiral higher-order topological insulators protected by the combination of time-reversal and a fourfold rotation symmetry. Their hinge states are chiral modes, and the bulk topology is Z2 -classified. (ii) Helical higher-order topological insulators protected by time-reversal and mirror symmetries. Their hinge states come in Kramers pairs, and the bulk topology is Z -classified. We provide the topological invariants for both cases. Furthermore, we show that SnTe as well as surface-modified Bi 2 TeI, BiSe, and BiTe are helical higher-order topological insulators and propose a realistic experimental setup to detect the hinge states.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-06-22
    Description: IJERPH, Vol. 15, Pages 1299: Aspects of Additional Psychiatric Disorders in Severe Depression/Melancholia: A Comparison between Suicides and Controls and General Pattern International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph15071299 Authors: Ulrika Heu Mats Bogren August G. Wang Louise Brådvik Objective: Additional and comorbid diagnoses are common among suicide victims with major depressive disorder (MDD) and have been shown to increase the suicide risk. The aim of the present study was first, to investigate whether patients with severe depression/melancholia who had died by suicide showed more additional psychiatric disorders than a matched control group. Second, general rates of comorbid and additional diagnoses in the total group of patients were estimated and compared with literature on MDD. Method: A blind record evaluation was performed on 100 suicide victims with severe depression/melancholia (MDD with melancholic and/or psychotic features: MDD-M/P) and matched controls admitted to the Department of Psychiatry, Lund, Sweden between 1956 and 1969 and monitored to 2010. Diagnoses in addition to severe depression were noted. Results: Less than half of both the suicides and controls had just one psychiatric disorder (47% in the suicide and 46% in the control group). The average number of diagnoses was 1.80 and 1.82, respectively. Additional diagnoses were not related to an increased suicide risk. Anxiety was the most common diagnosis. Occurrence of suspected schizophrenia/schizotypal or additional obsessive-compulsive symptoms were more common than expected, but alcohol use disorders did not appear very frequent. Conclusions: The known increased risk of suicide in MDD with comorbid/additional diagnoses does not seem to apply to persons with MDD-M/P (major depressive disorder-depression/Melancholia). Some diagnoses, such as schizophrenia/schizotypal disorders, were more frequent than expected, which is discussed, and a genetic overlap with MDD-M/P is proposed.
    Print ISSN: 1661-7827
    Electronic ISSN: 1660-4601
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Medicine
    Published by MDPI Publishing
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