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  • 1
    Keywords: FOLLOW-UP ; NATURAL-HISTORY ; GLYCEMIC CONTROL ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; RETROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COMPETING RISKS ; CARDIOVASCULAR OUTCOMES ; GLUCOSE CONTROL ; CLINICAL-RESEARCH ; HEMOGLOBIN A(1C)
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Observational studies have shown that glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) is related to mortality, but the shape of the association is less clear. Furthermore, disease duration and medication may modify this association. This observational study explored the association between HbA(1c) measured in stored erythrocytes and mortality. Secondly, it was assessed whether disease duration and medication use influenced the estimates or were independently associated with mortality. METHODS: Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition a cohort was analysed of 4,345 individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of diabetes at enrolment. HbA(1c) was measured in blood samples stored up to 19 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models for all-cause mortality investigated HbA(1c) in quartiles as well as per 1% increment, diabetes medication in seven categories of insulin and oral hypoglycaemic agents, and disease duration in quartiles. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 9.3 years, 460 participants died. Higher HbA(1c) was associated with higher mortality: Hazard Ratio for 1%-increase was 1.11 (95% CI 1.06, 1.17). This association was linear (P-nonlinearity =0.15) and persistent across categories of medication use, disease duration, and co-morbidities. Compared with metformin, other medication types were not associated with mortality. Longer disease duration was associated with mortality, but not after adjustment for HbA(1c) and medication. CONCLUSION: This prospective study showed that persons with lower HbA(1c) had better survival than those with higher HbA(1c). The association was linear and independent of disease duration, type of medication use, and presence of co-morbidities. Any improvement of HbA(1c) appears to be associated with reduced mortality risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22719972
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK-FACTORS ; VARIANTS ; Mediterranean diet ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; IMPAIRED GLUCOSE-TOLERANCE ; 10 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS ; PREVENTION PROGRAM
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has progressed rapidly, but the interactions between common genetic variants and lifestyle risk factors have not been systematically investigated in studies with adequate statistical power. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the combined effects of genetic and lifestyle factors on risk of T2D in order to inform strategies for prevention. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The InterAct study includes 12,403 incident T2D cases and a representative sub-cohort of 16,154 individuals from a cohort of 340,234 European participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up. We studied the combined effects of an additive genetic T2D risk score and modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors using Prentice-weighted Cox regression and random effects meta-analysis methods. The effect of the genetic score was significantly greater in younger individuals (p for interaction = 1.20x10-4). Relative genetic risk (per standard deviation [4.4 risk alleles]) was also larger in participants who were leaner, both in terms of body mass index (p for interaction = 1.50x10-3) and waist circumference (p for interaction = 7.49x10-9). Examination of absolute risks by strata showed the importance of obesity for T2D risk. The 10-y cumulative incidence of T2D rose from 0.25% to 0.89% across extreme quartiles of the genetic score in normal weight individuals, compared to 4.22% to 7.99% in obese individuals. We detected no significant interactions between the genetic score and sex, diabetes family history, physical activity, or dietary habits assessed by a Mediterranean diet score. CONCLUSIONS: The relative effect of a T2D genetic risk score is greater in younger and leaner participants. However, this sub-group is at low absolute risk and would not be a logical target for preventive interventions. The high absolute risk associated with obesity at any level of genetic risk highlights the importance of universal rather than targeted approaches to lifestyle intervention.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24845081
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