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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-05-25
    Description: Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) materials are promising for spintronic and valleytronic applications because valley-polarized excitations can be generated and manipulated with circularly polarized photons and the valley and spin degrees of freedom are locked by strong spin-orbital interactions. In this study we demonstrate efficient generation of a pure and locked spin-valley diffusion current in tungsten disulfide (WS 2 )–tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) heterostructures without any driving electric field. We imaged the propagation of valley current in real time and space by pump-probe spectroscopy. The valley current in the heterostructures can live for more than 20 microseconds and propagate over 20 micrometers; both the lifetime and the diffusion length can be controlled through electrostatic gating. The high-efficiency and electric-field–free generation of a locked spin-valley current in TMDC heterostructures holds promise for applications in spin and valley devices.
    Keywords: Materials Science, Physics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-07-03
    Description: The extrusion of toxins and substances at a cellular level is a vital life process in plants under abiotic stress. The multidrug and toxic compound extrusion ( MATE ) gene family plays a large role in the exportation of toxins and other substrates. We carried out a genome-wide analysis of MATE gene families in Gossypium raimondii and Gossypium arboreum and assessed their expression levels under salt, cadmium and drought stresses. We identified 70 and 68 MATE genes in G. raimondii and G. arboreum , respectively. The majority of the genes were predicted to be localized within the plasma membrane, with some distributed in other cell parts. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the genes were subdivided into three subfamilies, designated as M1, M2 and M3. Closely related members shared similar gene structures, and thus were highly conserved in nature and have mainly evolved through purifying selection. The genes were distributed in all chromosomes. Twenty-nine gene duplication events were detected, with segmental being the dominant type. GO annotation revealed a link to salt, drought and cadmium stresses. The genes exhibited differential expression, with GrMATE18 , GrMATE34 , GaMATE41 and GaMATE51 significantly upregulated under drought, salt and cadmium stress, and these could possibly be the candidate genes. Our results provide the first data on the genome-wide and functional characterization of MATE genes in diploid cotton, and are important for breeders of more stress-tolerant cotton genotypes.
    Electronic ISSN: 2160-1836
    Topics: Biology
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-08-27
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Oct 22;526(7574):595. doi: 10.1038/nature15253. Epub 2015 Aug 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26308894" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: The human lens is comprised largely of crystallin proteins assembled into a highly ordered, interactive macro-structure essential for lens transparency and refractive index. Any disruption of intra- or inter-protein interactions will alter this delicate structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces, with consequent protein aggregation and cataract formation. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness worldwide, affecting tens of millions of people, and currently the only treatment is surgical removal of cataractous lenses. The precise mechanisms by which lens proteins both prevent aggregation and maintain lens transparency are largely unknown. Lanosterol is an amphipathic molecule enriched in the lens. It is synthesized by lanosterol synthase (LSS) in a key cyclization reaction of a cholesterol synthesis pathway. Here we identify two distinct homozygous LSS missense mutations (W581R and G588S) in two families with extensive congenital cataracts. Both of these mutations affect highly conserved amino acid residues and impair key catalytic functions of LSS. Engineered expression of wild-type, but not mutant, LSS prevents intracellular protein aggregation of various cataract-causing mutant crystallins. Treatment by lanosterol, but not cholesterol, significantly decreased preformed protein aggregates both in vitro and in cell-transfection experiments. We further show that lanosterol treatment could reduce cataract severity and increase transparency in dissected rabbit cataractous lenses in vitro and cataract severity in vivo in dogs. Our study identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):607-11. doi: 10.1038/nature14650. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] CapitalBio Genomics Co., Ltd., Dongguan 523808, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [4] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200341" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Amyloid/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cataract/congenital/*drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Child ; Crystallins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Dogs ; Female ; Humans ; Lanosterol/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Lens, Crystalline/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Male ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Pedigree ; Protein Aggregates/*drug effects ; Protein Aggregation, Pathological/*drug therapy/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-10-10
    Description: Mutations in ERBB2 , the gene encoding epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family member HER2, are common in and drive the growth of "HER2-negative" (not ERBB2 amplified) tumors but are rare in "HER2-positive" ( ERBB2 amplified) breast cancer. We analyzed DNA-sequencing data from HER2-positive patients and used cell lines and a patient-derived xenograft model to test the consequence of HER2 mutations on the efficacy of anti-HER2 agents such as trastuzumab, lapatinib, and neratinib, an irreversible pan-EGFR inhibitor. HER2 mutations were present in ~7% of HER2-positive tumors, all of which were metastatic but not all were previously treated. Compared to HER2 amplification alone, in both patients and cultured cell lines, the co-occurrence of HER2 mutation and amplification was associated with poor response to trastuzumab and lapatinib, the standard-of-care anti-HER2 agents. In mice, xenografts established from a patient whose HER2-positive tumor acquired a D769Y mutation in HER2 after progression on trastuzumab-based therapy were resistant to trastuzumab or lapatinib but were sensitive to neratinib. Clinical data revealed that six heavily pretreated patients with tumors bearing coincident HER2 amplification and mutation subsequently exhibited a statistically significant response to neratinib monotherapy. Thus, these findings indicate that coincident HER2 mutation reduces the efficacy of therapies commonly used to treat HER2-positive breast cancer, particularly in metastatic and previously HER2 inhibitor–treated patients, as well as potentially in patients scheduled for first-line treatment. Therefore, we propose that clinical studies testing the efficacy of neratinib are warranted selectively in breast cancer patients whose tumors carry both amplification and mutation of ERBB2 /HER2.
    Print ISSN: 1945-0877
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-03-10
    Description: The repair and regeneration of tissues using endogenous stem cells represents an ultimate goal in regenerative medicine. To our knowledge, human lens regeneration has not yet been demonstrated. Currently, the only treatment for cataracts, the leading cause of blindness worldwide, is to extract the cataractous lens and implant an artificial intraocular lens. However, this procedure poses notable risks of complications. Here we isolate lens epithelial stem/progenitor cells (LECs) in mammals and show that Pax6 and Bmi1 are required for LEC renewal. We design a surgical method of cataract removal that preserves endogenous LECs and achieves functional lens regeneration in rabbits and macaques, as well as in human infants with cataracts. Our method differs conceptually from current practice, as it preserves endogenous LECs and their natural environment maximally, and regenerates lenses with visual function. Our approach demonstrates a novel treatment strategy for cataracts and provides a new paradigm for tissue regeneration using endogenous stem cells.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lin, Haotian -- Ouyang, Hong -- Zhu, Jie -- Huang, Shan -- Liu, Zhenzhen -- Chen, Shuyi -- Cao, Guiqun -- Li, Gen -- Signer, Robert A J -- Xu, Yanxin -- Chung, Christopher -- Zhang, Ying -- Lin, Danni -- Patel, Sherrina -- Wu, Frances -- Cai, Huimin -- Hou, Jiayi -- Wen, Cindy -- Jafari, Maryam -- Liu, Xialin -- Luo, Lixia -- Zhu, Jin -- Qiu, Austin -- Hou, Rui -- Chen, Baoxin -- Chen, Jiangna -- Granet, David -- Heichel, Christopher -- Shang, Fu -- Li, Xuri -- Krawczyk, Michal -- Skowronska-Krawczyk, Dorota -- Wang, Yujuan -- Shi, William -- Chen, Daniel -- Zhong, Zheng -- Zhong, Sheng -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Chen, Shaochen -- Morrison, Sean J -- Maas, Richard L -- Zhang, Kang -- Liu, Yizhi -- R37 AG024945/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 17;531(7594):323-8. doi: 10.1038/nature17181. Epub 2016 Mar 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; Shiley Eye Institute, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Children's Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China. ; Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Clinical and Translational Research Institute, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26958831" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cataract/congenital/pathology/physiopathology/*therapy ; Cataract Extraction ; Epithelial Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Eye Proteins/metabolism ; Homeodomain Proteins/metabolism ; Homeostasis ; Humans ; Lens, Crystalline/*cytology/*physiology ; Macaca ; Paired Box Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Polycomb Repressive Complex 1/metabolism ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/metabolism ; *Recovery of Function ; Regeneration/*physiology ; Repressor Proteins/metabolism ; Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Vision, Ocular/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-08-28
    Description: Mucus clearance is the primary defense mechanism that protects airways from inhaled infectious and toxic agents. In the current gel-on-liquid mucus clearance model, a mucus gel is propelled on top of a "watery" periciliary layer surrounding the cilia. However, this model fails to explain the formation of a distinct mucus layer in health or why mucus clearance fails in disease. We propose a gel-on-brush model in which the periciliary layer is occupied by membrane-spanning mucins and mucopolysaccharides densely tethered to the airway surface. This brush prevents mucus penetration into the periciliary space and causes mucus to form a distinct layer. The relative osmotic moduli of the mucus and periciliary brush layers explain both the stability of mucus clearance in health and its failure in airway disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3633213/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3633213/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Button, Brian -- Cai, Li-Heng -- Ehre, Camille -- Kesimer, Mehmet -- Hill, David B -- Sheehan, John K -- Boucher, Richard C -- Rubinstein, Michael -- HHSN268200900020/PHS HHS/ -- K01DK080847/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P01HL108808/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01HL110873-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01HL34322/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P30DK065988/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P50HL107168/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P50HL107168-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL103940/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01HL077546/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01HL103940/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- UL1-RR025747/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Aug 24;337(6097):937-41. doi: 10.1126/science.1223012.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cystic Fibrosis Research and Treatment Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7248, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22923574" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cells, Cultured ; Cilia/*physiology/ultrastructure ; Gels ; Glycosaminoglycans/*physiology ; Humans ; Lung/*physiology ; Lung Diseases/physiopathology ; *Models, Biological ; Mucins/*physiology ; *Mucociliary Clearance ; Mucus/*physiology ; Osmotic Pressure ; Respiratory Mucosa/*physiology/ultrastructure
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-07-28
    Description: As a partner antimalarial for artemisinin drug-based combination therapy (ACT), piperaquine (PQ) can be metabolized into two major metabolites, including piperaquine N -oxide (M1) and piperaquine N , N -dioxide (M2). To better understand the antimalarial potency of PQ, the antimalarial activity of the PQ metabolites (M1 and M2) was studied in vitro (in Plasmodium falciparum strains Pf 3D7 and Pf Dd2) and in vivo (in the murine species Plasmodium yoelii ) in this study. The recrudescence and survival time of infected mice were also recorded after drug treatment. The pharmacokinetic profiles of PQ and its two metabolites (M1 and M2) were investigated in healthy subjects after oral doses of two widely used ACT regimens, i.e., dihydroartemisinin plus piperaquine phosphate (Duo-Cotecxin) and artemisinin plus piperaquine (Artequick). Remarkable antiplasmodial activity was found for PQ (50% growth-inhibitory concentration [IC 50 ], 4.5 nM against Pf 3D7 and 6.9 nM against Pf Dd2; 90% effective dose [ED 90 ], 1.3 mg/kg of body weight), M1 (IC 50 , 25.5 nM against Pf 3D7 and 38.7 nM against Pf Dd2; ED 90 , 1.3 mg/kg), and M2 (IC 50 , 31.2 nM against Pf 3D7 and 33.8 nM against Pf Dd2; ED 90 , 2.9 mg/kg). Compared with PQ, M1 showed comparable efficacy in terms of recrudescence and survival time and M2 had relatively weaker antimalarial potency. PQ and its two metabolites displayed a long elimination half-life (~11 days for PQ, ~9 days for M1, and ~4 days for M2), and they accumulated after repeated administrations. The contribution of the two PQ metabolites to the efficacy of piperaquine as a partner drug of ACT for the treatment of malaria should be considered for PQ dose optimization.
    Print ISSN: 0066-4804
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-6596
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-10-16
    Description: Naive embryonic stem cells hold great promise for research and therapeutics as they have broad and robust developmental potential. While such cells are readily derived from mouse blastocysts it has not been possible to isolate human equivalents easily, although human naive-like cells have been artificially generated (rather than extracted) by coercion of human primed embryonic stem cells by modifying culture conditions or through transgenic modification. Here we show that a sub-population within cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) manifests key properties of naive state cells. These naive-like cells can be genetically tagged, and are associated with elevated transcription of HERVH, a primate-specific endogenous retrovirus. HERVH elements provide functional binding sites for a combination of naive pluripotency transcription factors, including LBP9, recently recognized as relevant to naivety in mice. LBP9-HERVH drives hESC-specific alternative and chimaeric transcripts, including pluripotency-modulating long non-coding RNAs. Disruption of LBP9, HERVH and HERVH-derived transcripts compromises self-renewal. These observations define HERVH expression as a hallmark of naive-like hESCs, and establish novel primate-specific transcriptional circuitry regulating pluripotency.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Jichang -- Xie, Gangcai -- Singh, Manvendra -- Ghanbarian, Avazeh T -- Rasko, Tamas -- Szvetnik, Attila -- Cai, Huiqiang -- Besser, Daniel -- Prigione, Alessandro -- Fuchs, Nina V -- Schumann, Gerald G -- Chen, Wei -- Lorincz, Matthew C -- Ivics, Zoltan -- Hurst, Laurence D -- Izsvak, Zsuzsanna -- England -- Nature. 2014 Dec 18;516(7531):405-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13804. Epub 2014 Oct 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Delbruck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Rossle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin, Germany. ; 1] Max-Delbruck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Rossle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin, Germany [2] Key Laboratory of Computational Biology, CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology, 320 Yueyang Road, Shanghai 200031, China. ; University of Bath, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, Bath, Somerset BA2 7AY, UK. ; 1] Max-Delbruck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Rossle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin, Germany [2] Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, Division of Medical Biotechnology, Paul-Ehrlich-Strasse 51-59, 63225 Langen, Germany. ; Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, Division of Medical Biotechnology, Paul-Ehrlich-Strasse 51-59, 63225 Langen, Germany. ; Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25317556" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cells, Cultured ; DNA Transposable Elements ; Embryonic Stem Cells/*cytology/*metabolism ; Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics/*metabolism ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Genetic Markers ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*physiology/virology ; RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: Purpose: The prognosis for patients with refractory soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) is dismal. Anlotinib has previously shown antitumor activity on STS in preclinical and phase I studies. Patients and Methods: Patients 18 years and older, progressing after anthracycline-based chemotherapy, naïve from angiogenesis inhibitors, with at least one measurable lesion according to RECIST 1.1, were enrolled. The main subtypes eligible were undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS), liposarcoma (LPS), leiomyosarcoma (LMS), synovial sarcoma (SS), fibrosarcoma (FS), alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS), and clear cell sarcoma (CCS). Participants were treated with anlotinib. The primary endpoint was progression-free rate at 12 weeks (PFR 12 weeks ). Results: A total of 166 patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the PFR 12 weeks was 68%, and objective response rate was 13% (95% confidence interval, 7.6%–18%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5.6 and 12 months, respectively. The PFR 12 weeks , median PFS and OS were: 58%, 4.1 and 11 months for UPS ( n = 19); 63%, 5.6 and 13 months for LPS ( n = 13); 75%, 11 and 15 months for LMS ( n = 26); 75%, 7.7 and 12 months for SS ( n = 47); 81%, 5.6 and 12 months for FS ( n = 18); 77%, 21 and not reached for ASPS ( n = 13); 54%, 11 and 16 months for CCS ( n = 7); and 44%, 2.8 and 8.8 months for other sarcoma ( n = 23), respectively. The most common clinically significant grade 3 or higher adverse events were hypertension (4.8%), triglyceride elevation (3.6%), and pneumothorax (2.4%). No treatment-related death occurred. Conclusions: Anlotinib showed antitumor activity in several STS entities. The toxicity was manageable. Clin Cancer Res; 24(21); 5233–8. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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