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  • 1
    Keywords: GENE-EXPRESSION ; DIFFERENTIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; SIGNATURE ; RISK STRATIFICATION ; transcriptome ; EXPRESSION-BASED CLASSIFICATION ; NEUROBLASTOMA PATIENTS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Gene expression profiling is being widely applied in cancer research to identify biomarkers for clinical endpoint prediction. Since RNA-seq provides a powerful tool for transcriptome-based applications beyond the limitations of microarrays, we sought to systematically evaluate the performance of RNA-seq-based and microarray-based classifiers in this MAQC-III/SEQC study for clinical endpoint prediction using neuroblastoma as a model. RESULTS: We generate gene expression profiles from 498 primary neuroblastomas using both RNA-seq and 44 k microarrays. Characterization of the neuroblastoma transcriptome by RNA-seq reveals that more than 48,000 genes and 200,000 transcripts are being expressed in this malignancy. We also find that RNA-seq provides much more detailed information on specific transcript expression patterns in clinico-genetic neuroblastoma subgroups than microarrays. To systematically compare the power of RNA-seq and microarray-based models in predicting clinical endpoints, we divide the cohort randomly into training and validation sets and develop 360 predictive models on six clinical endpoints of varying predictability. Evaluation of factors potentially affecting model performances reveals that prediction accuracies are most strongly influenced by the nature of the clinical endpoint, whereas technological platforms (RNA-seq vs. microarrays), RNA-seq data analysis pipelines, and feature levels (gene vs. transcript vs. exon-junction level) do not significantly affect performances of the models. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that RNA-seq outperforms microarrays in determining the transcriptomic characteristics of cancer, while RNA-seq and microarray-based models perform similarly in clinical endpoint prediction. Our findings may be valuable to guide future studies on the development of gene expression-based predictive models and their implementation in clinical practice.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26109056
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-10-03
    Description: Obesity is associated with cancer risk and its link with liver cancer is particularly strong. Obesity causes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) that could progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Chronic inflammation likely plays a key role. We carried out a bioassay in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice to provide insight into the mechanisms of obesity-related HCC by studying -OHPdG, a mutagenic DNA adduct derived from lipid peroxidation. In an 80-week bioassay, mice received a low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD), and HFD with 2% Theaphenon E (TE) (HFD+TE). HFD mice developed a 42% incidence of HCC and LFD mice a 16%. Remarkably, TE, a standardized green tea extract formulation, completely blocked HCC in HFD mice with a 0% incidence. -OHPdG measured in the hepatic DNA of mice fed HFD and HFD+TE showed its levels increased during the early stages of NAFLD in HFD mice and the increases were significantly suppressed by TE, correlating with the tumor data. Whole-exome sequencing showed an increased mutation load in the liver tumors of HFD mice with G〉A and G〉T as the predominant mutations, consistent with the report that -OHPdG induces G〉A and G〉T. Furthermore, the mutation loads were significantly reduced in HFD+TE mice, particularly G〉T, the most common mutation in human HCC. These results demonstrate in a relevant model of obesity-induced HCC that -OHPdG formation during fatty liver disease may be an initiating event for accumulated mutations that leads to HCC and this process can be effectively inhibited by TE. Cancer Prev Res; 11(10); 665–76. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1940-6207
    Electronic ISSN: 1940-6215
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-10-05
    Description: Biodiversity experiments have shown that species loss reduces ecosystem functioning in grassland. To test whether this result can be extrapolated to forests, the main contributors to terrestrial primary productivity, requires large-scale experiments. We manipulated tree species richness by planting more than 150,000 trees in plots with 1 to 16 species. Simulating multiple extinction scenarios, we found that richness strongly increased stand-level productivity. After 8 years, 16-species mixtures had accumulated over twice the amount of carbon found in average monocultures and similar amounts as those of two commercial monocultures. Species richness effects were strongly associated with functional and phylogenetic diversity. A shrub addition treatment reduced tree productivity, but this reduction was smaller at high shrub species richness. Our results encourage multispecies afforestation strategies to restore biodiversity and mitigate climate change.
    Keywords: Ecology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: The Nkx2-1 transcription factor promotes differentiation of lung epithelial lineages and suppresses malignant progression of lung adenocarcinoma. However, targets of Nkx2-1 that limit tumor growth and progression remain incompletely understood. Here, direct Nkx2-1 targets are identified whose expression correlates with Nkx2-1 activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Selenium-binding protein 1 (Selenbp1), an Nkx2-1 effector that limits phenotypes associated with lung cancer growth and metastasis, was investigated further. Loss- and gain-of-function approaches demonstrate that Nkx2-1 is required and sufficient for Selenbp1 expression in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Interestingly, Selenbp1 knockdown also reduced Nkx2-1 expression and Selenbp1 stabilized Nkx2-1 protein levels in a heterologous system, suggesting that these genes function in a positive feedback loop. Selenbp1 inhibits clonal growth and migration and suppresses growth of metastases in an in vivo transplant model. Genetic inactivation of Selenbp1, using CRISPR/Cas9, also enhanced primary tumor growth in autochthonous lung adenocarcinoma mouse models. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Selenbp1 is a direct target of Nkx2-1, which inhibits lung adenocarcinoma growth in vivo . Implications: Selenbp1 is an important suppressor of lung tumor growth that functions in a positive feedback loop with Nkx2-1, and whose loss is associated with worse patient outcome. Mol Cancer Res; 16(11); 1737–49. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1541-7786
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3125
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-12-08
    Description: The temperature-sensitive and calcium-permeable transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) channel abundantly expressed in keratinocytes plays important functions in skin physiology. Dysfunctional gain-of-function TRPV3 gene mutations cause genetic Olmsted syndrome characterized by periorificial keratoderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, inflammation, and severe itching, which suggests that pharmacological inhibition of overactive TRPV3 function may be beneficial in treating pruritus or skin disorders. To test this hypothesis, we identified natural compound forsythoside B as a TRPV3 inhibitor through screening of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing human TRPV3 channels in a calcium fluorescent assay. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of HEK293 cells expressing TRPV3 confirmed that forsythoside B selectively inhibited the channel current activated by agonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (50 µ M) in a dose-dependent fashion, with an IC 50 value of 6.7 ± 0.7 μ M. In vivo evaluation of scratching behavior demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of TRPV3 by forsythoside B significantly attenuated acute itch induced by either the TRPV3 agonist carvacrol or the pruritogen histamine, as well as chronic itch induced by acetone-ether-water in a mouse model of dry skin. Furthermore, forsythoside B was able to prevent the death of HEK293 cells or native human immortalized nontumorigenic keratinocyte cells from human keratinocytes expressing a gain-of-function TRPV3 G573S mutant or in the presence of the TRPV3 agonist carvacrol. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the crucial role of TRPV3 in pruritus and keratinocyte toxicity; thus, specific inhibition of overactive TRPV3 by natural forsythoside B may possess therapeutic potential for treatment of chronic pruritus, skin allergy, or inflammation-related skin diseases.
    Print ISSN: 0022-3565
    Electronic ISSN: 1521-0103
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-04-07
    Description: Origin of vertical orientation in two-dimensional metal halide perovskites and its effect on photovoltaic performance Origin of vertical orientation in two-dimensional metal halide perovskites and its effect on photovoltaic performance, Published online: 06 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41467-018-03757-0 It is desirable to align the two-dimensional perovskite layers vertical to the electrodes to maximize device performance but the formation mechanism is unclear. Here Chen et al. reveal that the film formation starts at the liquid-air interface and is thus independent of the choice of substrates.
    Electronic ISSN: 2041-1723
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-04-12
    Description: Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, followed by gene loss and diploidization has long been recognized as an important evolutionary force in animals, fungi and other organisms, especially plants. The success of angiosperms has been attributed, in part, to innovations associated with gene or whole-genome duplications, but evidence for proposed ancient genome duplications pre-dating the divergence of monocots and eudicots remains equivocal in analyses of conserved gene order. Here we use comprehensive phylogenomic analyses of sequenced plant genomes and more than 12.6 million new expressed-sequence-tag sequences from phylogenetically pivotal lineages to elucidate two groups of ancient gene duplications-one in the common ancestor of extant seed plants and the other in the common ancestor of extant angiosperms. Gene duplication events were intensely concentrated around 319 and 192 million years ago, implicating two WGDs in ancestral lineages shortly before the diversification of extant seed plants and extant angiosperms, respectively. Significantly, these ancestral WGDs resulted in the diversification of regulatory genes important to seed and flower development, suggesting that they were involved in major innovations that ultimately contributed to the rise and eventual dominance of seed plants and angiosperms.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiao, Yuannian -- Wickett, Norman J -- Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj -- Chanderbali, Andre S -- Landherr, Lena -- Ralph, Paula E -- Tomsho, Lynn P -- Hu, Yi -- Liang, Haiying -- Soltis, Pamela S -- Soltis, Douglas E -- Clifton, Sandra W -- Schlarbaum, Scott E -- Schuster, Stephan C -- Ma, Hong -- Leebens-Mack, Jim -- dePamphilis, Claude W -- England -- Nature. 2011 May 5;473(7345):97-100. doi: 10.1038/nature09916. Epub 2011 Apr 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Plant Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21478875" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Angiosperms/*classification/*genetics ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Genome, Plant/*genetics ; Genomics ; Phylogeny ; *Polyploidy
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-07-11
    Description: Human pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, but available cell types have significant limitations. Although embryonic stem cells (ES cells) from in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF ES cells) represent the 'gold standard', they are allogeneic to patients. Autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations. To determine whether such abnormalities are intrinsic to somatic cell reprogramming or secondary to the reprogramming method, genetically matched sets of human IVF ES cells, iPS cells and nuclear transfer ES cells (NT ES cells) derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were subjected to genome-wide analyses. Both NT ES cells and iPS cells derived from the same somatic cells contained comparable numbers of de novo copy number variations. In contrast, DNA methylation and transcriptome profiles of NT ES cells corresponded closely to those of IVF ES cells, whereas iPS cells differed and retained residual DNA methylation patterns typical of parental somatic cells. Thus, human somatic cells can be faithfully reprogrammed to pluripotency by SCNT and are therefore ideal for cell replacement therapies.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Hong -- Morey, Robert -- O'Neil, Ryan C -- He, Yupeng -- Daughtry, Brittany -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Nery, Joseph R -- Castanon, Rosa -- Sabatini, Karen -- Thiagarajan, Rathi D -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Kang, Eunju -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Ahmed, Riffat -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Van Dyken, Crystal -- Polat, Alim -- Sugawara, Atsushi -- Sparman, Michelle -- Gokhale, Sumita -- Amato, Paula -- Wolf, Don P -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Laurent, Louise C -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 10;511(7508):177-83. doi: 10.1038/nature13551. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2]. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Bioinformatics Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, South Miyagi Medical Center, Shibata-gun, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan (M.T.); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden (A.P.). ; Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; University Pathologists LLC, Boston University School of Medicine, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island 02118, USA. ; Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3] Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25008523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Chromosome Aberrations ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; DNA Methylation ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Genomic Imprinting ; Humans ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques/standards ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*metabolism ; Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: Successful mammalian cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) into unfertilized, metaphase II (MII)-arrested oocytes attests to the cytoplasmic presence of reprogramming factors capable of inducing totipotency in somatic cell nuclei. However, these poorly defined maternal factors presumably decline sharply after fertilization, as the cytoplasm of pronuclear-stage zygotes is reportedly inactive. Recent evidence suggests that zygotic cytoplasm, if maintained at metaphase, can also support derivation of embryonic stem (ES) cells after SCNT, albeit at low efficiency. This led to the conclusion that critical oocyte reprogramming factors present in the metaphase but not in the interphase cytoplasm are 'trapped' inside the nucleus during interphase and effectively removed during enucleation. Here we investigated the presence of reprogramming activity in the cytoplasm of interphase two-cell mouse embryos (I2C). First, the presence of candidate reprogramming factors was documented in both intact and enucleated metaphase and interphase zygotes and two-cell embryos. Consequently, enucleation did not provide a likely explanation for the inability of interphase cytoplasm to induce reprogramming. Second, when we carefully synchronized the cell cycle stage between the transplanted nucleus (ES cell, fetal fibroblast or terminally differentiated cumulus cell) and the recipient I2C cytoplasm, the reconstructed SCNT embryos developed into blastocysts and ES cells capable of contributing to traditional germline and tetraploid chimaeras. Last, direct transfer of cloned embryos, reconstructed with ES cell nuclei, into recipients resulted in live offspring. Thus, the cytoplasm of I2C supports efficient reprogramming, with cell cycle synchronization between the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplasm as the most critical parameter determining success. The ability to use interphase cytoplasm in SCNT could aid efforts to generate autologous human ES cells for regenerative applications, as donated or discarded embryos are more accessible than unfertilized MII oocytes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124901/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124901/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Eunju -- Wu, Guangming -- Ma, Hong -- Li, Ying -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Sparman, Michelle -- Wolf, Don P -- Scholer, Hans R -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- P51 OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P51OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 1;509(7498):101-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13134. Epub 2014 Mar 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Munster 48149, Germany. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] South Miyagi Medical Center, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670652" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Count ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Cloning, Organism ; Cytoplasm/*metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/*cytology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/*cytology ; Female ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology ; *Interphase ; Male ; Metaphase ; Mice ; *Nuclear Transfer Techniques
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-12-18
    Description: Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCF(D3) ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCF(D3) ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Liang -- Liu, Xue -- Xiong, Guosheng -- Liu, Huihui -- Chen, Fulu -- Wang, Lei -- Meng, Xiangbing -- Liu, Guifu -- Yu, Hong -- Yuan, Yundong -- Yi, Wei -- Zhao, Lihua -- Ma, Honglei -- He, Yuanzheng -- Wu, Zhongshan -- Melcher, Karsten -- Qian, Qian -- Xu, H Eric -- Wang, Yonghong -- Li, Jiayang -- England -- Nature. 2013 Dec 19;504(7480):401-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12870. Epub 2013 Dec 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics and National Center for Plant Gene Research (Beijing), Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China [2]. ; State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics and National Center for Plant Gene Research (Beijing), Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ; VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue Northeast, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, China National Rice Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou 310006, China. ; 1] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China [2] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue Northeast, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24336200" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cloning, Molecular ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Lactones/*antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism ; Models, Biological ; Multiprotein Complexes/chemistry/metabolism ; Mutation/genetics ; Oryza/genetics/*metabolism ; Plant Growth Regulators/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism ; Plant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Proteolysis ; *Signal Transduction ; Ubiquitin/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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