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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-08-27
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Oct 22;526(7574):595. doi: 10.1038/nature15253. Epub 2015 Aug 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26308894" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: The human lens is comprised largely of crystallin proteins assembled into a highly ordered, interactive macro-structure essential for lens transparency and refractive index. Any disruption of intra- or inter-protein interactions will alter this delicate structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces, with consequent protein aggregation and cataract formation. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness worldwide, affecting tens of millions of people, and currently the only treatment is surgical removal of cataractous lenses. The precise mechanisms by which lens proteins both prevent aggregation and maintain lens transparency are largely unknown. Lanosterol is an amphipathic molecule enriched in the lens. It is synthesized by lanosterol synthase (LSS) in a key cyclization reaction of a cholesterol synthesis pathway. Here we identify two distinct homozygous LSS missense mutations (W581R and G588S) in two families with extensive congenital cataracts. Both of these mutations affect highly conserved amino acid residues and impair key catalytic functions of LSS. Engineered expression of wild-type, but not mutant, LSS prevents intracellular protein aggregation of various cataract-causing mutant crystallins. Treatment by lanosterol, but not cholesterol, significantly decreased preformed protein aggregates both in vitro and in cell-transfection experiments. We further show that lanosterol treatment could reduce cataract severity and increase transparency in dissected rabbit cataractous lenses in vitro and cataract severity in vivo in dogs. Our study identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):607-11. doi: 10.1038/nature14650. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] CapitalBio Genomics Co., Ltd., Dongguan 523808, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [4] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200341" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Amyloid/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cataract/congenital/*drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Child ; Crystallins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Dogs ; Female ; Humans ; Lanosterol/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Lens, Crystalline/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Male ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Pedigree ; Protein Aggregates/*drug effects ; Protein Aggregation, Pathological/*drug therapy/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-10
    Description: The repair and regeneration of tissues using endogenous stem cells represents an ultimate goal in regenerative medicine. To our knowledge, human lens regeneration has not yet been demonstrated. Currently, the only treatment for cataracts, the leading cause of blindness worldwide, is to extract the cataractous lens and implant an artificial intraocular lens. However, this procedure poses notable risks of complications. Here we isolate lens epithelial stem/progenitor cells (LECs) in mammals and show that Pax6 and Bmi1 are required for LEC renewal. We design a surgical method of cataract removal that preserves endogenous LECs and achieves functional lens regeneration in rabbits and macaques, as well as in human infants with cataracts. Our method differs conceptually from current practice, as it preserves endogenous LECs and their natural environment maximally, and regenerates lenses with visual function. Our approach demonstrates a novel treatment strategy for cataracts and provides a new paradigm for tissue regeneration using endogenous stem cells.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lin, Haotian -- Ouyang, Hong -- Zhu, Jie -- Huang, Shan -- Liu, Zhenzhen -- Chen, Shuyi -- Cao, Guiqun -- Li, Gen -- Signer, Robert A J -- Xu, Yanxin -- Chung, Christopher -- Zhang, Ying -- Lin, Danni -- Patel, Sherrina -- Wu, Frances -- Cai, Huimin -- Hou, Jiayi -- Wen, Cindy -- Jafari, Maryam -- Liu, Xialin -- Luo, Lixia -- Zhu, Jin -- Qiu, Austin -- Hou, Rui -- Chen, Baoxin -- Chen, Jiangna -- Granet, David -- Heichel, Christopher -- Shang, Fu -- Li, Xuri -- Krawczyk, Michal -- Skowronska-Krawczyk, Dorota -- Wang, Yujuan -- Shi, William -- Chen, Daniel -- Zhong, Zheng -- Zhong, Sheng -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Chen, Shaochen -- Morrison, Sean J -- Maas, Richard L -- Zhang, Kang -- Liu, Yizhi -- R37 AG024945/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 17;531(7594):323-8. doi: 10.1038/nature17181. Epub 2016 Mar 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; Shiley Eye Institute, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Children's Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China. ; Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Clinical and Translational Research Institute, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26958831" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cataract/congenital/pathology/physiopathology/*therapy ; Cataract Extraction ; Epithelial Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Eye Proteins/metabolism ; Homeodomain Proteins/metabolism ; Homeostasis ; Humans ; Lens, Crystalline/*cytology/*physiology ; Macaca ; Paired Box Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Polycomb Repressive Complex 1/metabolism ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/metabolism ; *Recovery of Function ; Regeneration/*physiology ; Repressor Proteins/metabolism ; Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Vision, Ocular/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-07-18
    Description: The surface of the cornea consists of a unique type of non-keratinized epithelial cells arranged in an orderly fashion, and this is essential for vision by maintaining transparency for light transmission. Cornea epithelial cells (CECs) undergo continuous renewal from limbal stem or progenitor cells (LSCs), and deficiency in LSCs or corneal epithelium--which turns cornea into a non-transparent, keratinized skin-like epithelium--causes corneal surface disease that leads to blindness in millions of people worldwide. How LSCs are maintained and differentiated into corneal epithelium in healthy individuals and which key molecular events are defective in patients have been largely unknown. Here we report establishment of an in vitro feeder-cell-free LSC expansion and three-dimensional corneal differentiation protocol in which we found that the transcription factors p63 (tumour protein 63) and PAX6 (paired box protein PAX6) act together to specify LSCs, and WNT7A controls corneal epithelium differentiation through PAX6. Loss of WNT7A or PAX6 induces LSCs into skin-like epithelium, a critical defect tightly linked to common human corneal diseases. Notably, transduction of PAX6 in skin epithelial stem cells is sufficient to convert them to LSC-like cells, and upon transplantation onto eyes in a rabbit corneal injury model, these reprogrammed cells are able to replenish CECs and repair damaged corneal surface. These findings suggest a central role of the WNT7A-PAX6 axis in corneal epithelial cell fate determination, and point to a new strategy for treating corneal surface diseases.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4610745/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4610745/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ouyang, Hong -- Xue, Yuanchao -- Lin, Ying -- Zhang, Xiaohui -- Xi, Lei -- Patel, Sherrina -- Cai, Huimin -- Luo, Jing -- Zhang, Meixia -- Zhang, Ming -- Yang, Yang -- Li, Gen -- Li, Hairi -- Jiang, Wei -- Yeh, Emily -- Lin, Jonathan -- Pei, Michelle -- Zhu, Jin -- Cao, Guiqun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Yu, Benjamin -- Chen, Shaochen -- Fu, Xiang-Dong -- Liu, Yizhi -- Zhang, Kang -- GM049369/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY020846/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY021374/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 17;511(7509):358-61. doi: 10.1038/nature13465. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing 100730, China (X.Z.); Department of Ophthalmology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004, China (Y.Y.). ; Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company Ltd., Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [3] Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [3] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China [4] Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25030175" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Lineage ; Corneal Diseases/*metabolism/*pathology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Epithelium, Corneal/*cytology/*metabolism/pathology ; Eye Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Homeodomain Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; *Homeostasis ; Humans ; Limbus Corneae/cytology/metabolism ; Male ; Paired Box Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism ; Rabbits ; Repressor Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Skin/cytology/metabolism/pathology ; Stem Cell Transplantation ; Stem Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism ; Wnt Proteins/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Keywords: human ; screening ; incidence ; POPULATION ; GENE ; MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION ; TIME ; PATIENT ; DNA ; BINDING ; SEQUENCE ; ASSOCIATION ; chromosome ; FREQUENCY ; VARIANTS ; FREQUENCIES ; MUTANT ; ASSAY ; DESIGN ; MUTATION ; REGION ; GENOTYPES ; MUTATIONS ; STATISTICAL-ANALYSIS ; INDIVIDUALS ; SELECTION ; pathology ; SEQUENCE-ANALYSIS ; HETEROGENEITY ; ORIGIN ; CHROMOSOMES ; DNA-SEQUENCE ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; analysis ; methods ; MISSENSE MUTATION ; GENOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPES ; DEFICIENT ; female ; Male ; PEOPLE ; population-based ; LIQUID ; DEFECT ; RARE ; MOLECULAR ANALYSIS ; thalassemia ; G6PD DEFICIENCY ; G6PD gene ; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) ; neutral mutation
    Abstract: Background and Objectives. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human metabolic disorder in southern China. We investigated the incidence and distribution of mutations, the molecular pathology of affected females and the haplotype association with G6PD deficiency in patients from the Guangxi region. Design and Methods. A population-based molecular analysis combining phenotypic screening and genotypic detection using both multiplex primer extension/denaturing high performance liquid chromatography assay and DNA sequence analysis were performed in a total of 4,704 individuals. Results. The mutation frequency of male G6PD-deficient individuals was observed to be 7.43%. Twenty-seven genotypes from 361 individuals were found. Statistical analysis showed that there were significant differences in both the percentages of methemoglobin and the G6PD/6PGD ratio between heterozygote and hemizygote in males and between heterozygote and homozygote in females. However, no statistically significance was seen between hemizyotes and homozygotes. The mutation profile showed that five mutations, G6PD Kaiping(1388A), G6PD Canton(1376T), G6PD Gaohe(95G), Chinese-5(1024T) and G6PD Viangchan(871A), are the most common in the area, accounting for 85% of the G6PD-deficient alleles. Ten rare mutations were detected in approximately 4% of the mutant chromosomes. Four novel mutations were found: G6PD Liuzhou(442A), G6PD Nanning(703T), G6PD Laibin(1414C), and G6PD Hechi(202A/871A). In addition, two other rare mutations, c.196T -〉 A and c.202 G -〉 A, were detected for the first time in Chinese patients. A single dominant haplotype (--+--) was observed in 94.0% of 182 deficient chromosomes. Interpretation and Conclusions. Our protocol could be used to extend the knowledge of molecular defects of G6PD gene in different geographical areas
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17018380
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1600-0765
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Tissues lost as a consequence of periodontal diseases, i.e. bone, cementum and a functional periodontal ligament (PDL), can be restored to some degree. Nevertheless, results are often disappointing. There is a need to develop new paradigms for regenerating periodontal tissues that are based on an understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the development and regeneration of periodontal tissues. As one approach we have developed strategies for maintaining cementoblasts in culture by first determining the gene profile for these cells in situ. Next, cells were immortalized in vitro using SV 40 large T antigen (SV40 Tag) or by using mice containing transgenes enabling cellular immortality in vitro. Cementoblasts in vitro retained expression of genes associated with mineralized tissues, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin, that were not linked with periodontal fibroblasts either in situ or in vitro. Further, cementoblasts promoted mineralization in vitro as measured by von Kossa and in vivo using a severely compromised immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. These cells responded to growth factors by eliciting changes in gene profile and mitogenesis and to osteotropic hormones by evoking changes in gene profile and ability to induce mineral nodule formation in vitro. The ultimate goal of these studies is to provide the knowledge base required for designing improved modalities for use in periodontal regenerative therapies.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [S.l.] : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Journal of Applied Physics 66 (1989), S. 4752-4755 
    ISSN: 1089-7550
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: For diffusion in a real alloy, some concepts of formal percolation theory may need to be reconsidered because the "immobile'' atoms are not truly immobile. Our Monte Carlo simulations of vacancy diffusion on bcc lattices show the existence of a relationship between the activation barrier heights for the vacancy-atom exchanges and the effective percolation threshold concentration. In the language of formal percolation theory, we have modeled this problem by varying the immobile species' barrier height from infinity to some finite value and calculating the resulting percolation threshold. When both species of atoms have a finite mobility, however, our results can be interpreted in terms of probabilities for vacancies to escape local clusters in a fixed amount of time. We find that the dynamical behavior undergoes a marked change above and below the formal percolation threshold, but the strength of the percolating cluster is much less important than in formal percolation theory.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0022-0248
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 0022-460X
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    ISSN: 1365-2036
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Acupuncture has been practiced empirically in China for several millennia, and is being increasingly accepted by practitioners and patients worldwide. Functional gastrointestinal disorders are common in clinical gastroenterology. The prevalence of one or more functional gastrointestinal disorders is estimated to be as high as 70% in general population using Rome diagnostic criteria. Since functional gastrointestinal disorders are diagnosed based on symptoms and the exact aetiologies for most of functional gastrointestinal disorders are not completely known, it is not unusual that the treatment for these disorders is unsatisfactory and alternative therapies are attractive to both patients and practitioners. During the latest decades, a considerable number of studies have been performed on acupuncture for the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders and underlying mechanisms. In this article, we reviewed available data in the literature on the applications and mechanisms of acupuncture for the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders, including functional oesophageal disorders, nausea and vomiting, functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, etc. A summary is provided based on the quality and quantity of published studies regarding the efficacy of acupuncture in treating these various disorders. In addition, the methodology of acupuncture is also introduced.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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