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  • 1
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation involves major biochemical and structural changes. In order to elucidate the role of gene regulatory changes during this process, we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze the complete transcriptome and epigenome of human monocytes that were differentiated in vitro by addition of colony-stimulating factor 1 in serum-free medium. RESULTS: Numerous mRNAs and miRNAs were significantly up- or down-regulated. More than 100 discrete DNA regions, most often far away from transcription start sites, were rapidly demethylated by the ten eleven translocation enzymes, became nucleosome-free and gained histone marks indicative of active enhancers. These regions were unique for macrophages and associated with genes involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, phagocytosis and innate immune response. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, we have discovered a phagocytic gene network that is repressed by DNA methylation in monocytes and rapidly de-repressed after the onset of macrophage differentiation.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27478504
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-06-04
    Description: Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics instructors have been charged with improving the performance and retention of students from diverse backgrounds. To date, programs that close the achievement gap between students from disadvantaged versus nondisadvantaged educational backgrounds have required extensive extramural funding. We show that a highly structured course design, based on daily and weekly practice with problem-solving, data analysis, and other higher-order cognitive skills, improved the performance of all students in a college-level introductory biology class and reduced the achievement gap between disadvantaged and nondisadvantaged students--without increased expenditures. These results support the Carnegie Hall hypothesis: Intensive practice, via active-learning exercises, has a disproportionate benefit for capable but poorly prepared students.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Haak, David C -- HilleRisLambers, Janneke -- Pitre, Emile -- Freeman, Scott -- 52003841/Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jun 3;332(6034):1213-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1204820.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21636776" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Achievement ; Biology/*education ; Curriculum ; Educational Measurement ; Female ; Humans ; *Learning ; Male ; Minority Groups ; Models, Educational ; *Problem-Based Learning ; *Students ; Teaching/*methods ; Universities ; Washington
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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