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  • 1
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    Keywords: CANCER ; human ; PROTEINS ; PATIENT ; DNA ; MECHANISM ; CONTRAST ; CYCLE ; papillomavirus ; FREQUENCY ; AGE ; MUTATION ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; inactivation ; human papillomavirus ; TYPE-16 ; WILD-TYPE ; MUTATIONS ; HPV ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; HEAD ; TOBACCO ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; INVASIVE CERVICAL-CANCER ; NECK CANCERS ; ORAL CAVITY ; ORAL-CANCER ; DRINKING ; P53 STATUS ; SUBSET
    Abstract: TP53 mutations were analyzed in 35 human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA-positive cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx and in 35 HPV DNA-negative cancers matched by subsite, country, sex, age, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Wild-type TP53 was found more frequently in cancer specimens that contained HPV16 DNA than in those that did not. All 14 HPV16 DNA-positive cancers in HPV16 E6 antibody-positive patients contained wild-type TP53, compared with 50% of corresponding HPV DNA-negative cancers (matched odds ratio, infinity; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-infinity). In contrast, for HPV16 DNA-positive cancers in E6-negative patients, wild-type TP53 frequency was similar to that in corresponding HPV DNA-negative cancers (matched odds ratio, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.2-5.4). TP53 inactivation is a major mechanism of HPV-related carcinogenesis in the oral cavity and oropharynx. The role of HPV in cancers also containing TP53 mutations remains to be clarified
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14744758
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  • 3
    Keywords: tumor ; carcinoma ; DIAGNOSIS ; QUANTIFICATION ; EXPOSURE ; HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA ; liver ; RISK ; SITE ; GENE ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; DNA ; INFECTION ; hepatocellular carcinoma ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MUTATION ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; ELECTROSPRAY ; mass spectrometry ; REGION ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; REGIONS ; RECRUITMENT ; INDIVIDUALS ; SELECTION ; QUANTITATIVE-ANALYSIS ; PREVALENCE ; MASSES ; STANDARD ; SUBSET ; P53 GENE ; targeted ; LEVEL ; AFLATOXIN EXPOSURE ; INTERVAL ; CODON ; analysis ; HEPATITIS-B ; GENDER ; MASS ; PARTICIPANTS ; AFLATOXIN B-1 ; CELL-FREE DNA ; CODON-249 MUTATIONS ; GAMBIA ; HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA PATIENTS ; WEST-AFRICA ; hepatitis B
    Abstract: A mutation in codon 249 of the TP53 gene (249(Ser)), related to aflatoxin B(1) exposure, has previously been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma risk. Using a novel internal standard plasmid, plasma concentrations of 249(Ser)-mutated DNA were quantified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in 89 hepatocellular carcinoma cases, 42 cirrhotic patients, and 131 nonliver diseased control subjects, all from highly aflatoxin-exposed regions of The Gambia. The hepatocellular carcinoma cases had higher median plasma concentrations of 249(Ser) (2,800 copies/mL; interquartile range: 500-11,000) compared with either cirrhotic (500 copies/mL; interquartile range: 500-2,600) or control subjects (500 copies/mL; interquartile range: 500-2,000; P 〈 0.05). About half (52%) of the hepatocellular carcinoma cases had 〉2,500 copies of 249(Ser)/mL plasma, corresponding to the prevalence of this mutation in liver tumors in The Gambia. In comparison, only 15% of control group and 26% of cirrhotic participants exceeded this level (P 〈 0.05). Further subset analysis revealed a statistically significant, quantitative relation between diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and levels of 249(Ser) detected at 2,501 to 10,000 copies/mL plasma (odds ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-10.9) and at 〉10,000 copies/mL plasma (odds ratio, 62; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-820) when compared with control subjects and after adjusting for age, gender, recruitment site, hepatitis B and C serologic status, and total DNA concentration. Levels of 〉10,000 copies of 249(Ser)/mL plasma were also significantly associated with the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (odds ratio, 15; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-140) when compared with cirrhotic patients. Potential applications for the quantification of 249(Ser) DNA in plasma include estimation of long-term, cumulative aflatoxin exposure and selection of appropriate high-risk individuals for targeted intervention.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16365016
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; EMPHYSEMA ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; NETWORKS ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; GENES ; TIME ; DNA ; AIR-POLLUTION ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AGE ; REPAIR ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; DAMAGE ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; DNA-DAMAGE ; RECRUITMENT ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; WHITE BLOOD-CELLS ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; case-control study ; DETERMINANTS ; monitoring ; GSTM1 ; LEVEL ; ADDUCT ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; DNA damage ; DNA ADDUCT ; ABILITY ; GENDER ; OUTDOOR AIR-POLLUTION ; OZONE
    Abstract: Objectives were to investigate prospectively the ability of DNA adducts to predict cancer and to study the determinants of adducts, especially air pollutants. DNA adducts were measured in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC investigation. Cases included newly diagnosed lung cancer (n = 115), upper respiratory cancers (pharynx and larynx, n 82), bladder cancer (n = 124), leukemia (n = 166), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema deaths (n = 77) accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC former smokers and never-smokers. Three controls per case were matched for questionnaire analyses and two controls per case for laboratory analyses. Matching criteria were gender, age, smoking status, country of recruitment, and follow-up time. Individual exposure to air pollution was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine air quality monitoring networks. Leukocyte DNA adducts were analyzed blindly using (32)p postlabeling technique. Adducts were associated with the subsequent risk of lung cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.86 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.88-3.931 when comparing detectable versus nondetectable adducts. The association with lung cancer was stronger in never-smokers (OR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.06-15.42) and among the younger age groups. After exclusion of the cancers occurring in the first 36 months of follow-up, the OR was 4.16 (95% CI, 1.24-13.88). A positive association was found between DNA adducts and ozone (O-3) concentration. Our prospective study suggests that leukocyte DNA adducts may predict lung cancer risk of never-smokers. Besides, the association of DNA adduct levels with O-3 indicates a possible role for photochemical smog in determining DNA damage
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16140979
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  • 5
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; human ; IN-VIVO ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; DEATH ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; transcription ; MICE ; TIME ; MECHANISM ; CARCINOGENESIS ; SKIN ; E7 ; papillomavirus ; TRANSGENIC MICE ; p53 ; human papillomavirus ; E6 ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; RE ; TUMORIGENESIS ; downregulation ; function ; cutaneous HPV38 ; Delta Np73 ; E6 and E7
    Abstract: The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of Delta Np73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. Delta Np73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and Delta Np73 in human carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16397624
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  • 6
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; CELL ; LUNG ; LUNG-CANCER ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; GENE ; GENES ; GENOME ; PROTEIN ; TISSUE ; MARKER ; TISSUES ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ACID ; COUNTRIES ; REGION ; FRANCE ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; RECEPTORS ; SMOKERS ; DEPENDENCE ; SNPs ; NEURONS ; CANDIDATE ; ENGLAND ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; NUCLEOTIDE ; FAGERSTROM TOLERANCE QUESTIONNAIRE ; HAPLOTYPE MAP
    Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide, with over one million cases annually(1). To identify genetic factors that modify disease risk, we conducted a genome- wide association study by analysing 317,139 single- nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,989 lung cancer cases and 2,625 controls from six central European countries. We identified a locus in chromosome region 15q25 that was strongly associated with lung cancer ( P= 9 x 10(-10)). This locus was replicated in five separate lung cancer studies comprising an additional 2,513 lung cancer cases and 4,752 controls ( P = 5 x 10(-20) overall), and it was found to account for 14%( attributable risk) of lung cancer cases. Statistically similar risks were observed irrespective of smoking status or propensity to smoke tobacco. The association region contains several genes, including three that encode nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits ( CHRNA5, CHRNA3 and CHRNB4). Such subunits are expressed in neurons and other tissues, in particular alveolar epithelial cells, pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and lung cancer cell lines(2,3), and they bind to N'- nitrosonornicotine and potential lung carcinogens(4). A non- synonymous variant of CHRNA5 that induces an amino acid substitution ( D398N) at a highly conserved site in the second intracellular loop of the protein is among the markers with the strongest disease associations. Our results provide compelling evidence of a locus at 15q25 predisposing to lung cancer, and reinforce interest in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as potential disease candidates and chemopreventative targets(5)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18385738
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; COMBINATION ; EXPOSURE ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; RISK-FACTORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; MUTATION ; risk factors ; smoking ; inactivation ; RISK FACTOR ; FRANCE ; MUTATIONS ; HEAD ; NECK ; TOBACCO ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMAS ; PREVALENCE ; SMOKERS ; ONCOLOGY ; PATTERN ; P53 GENE ; EGFR ; NEVER SMOKERS ; CANCERS ; EXONS ; TP53 MUTATIONS ; tumours ; LUNG CANCERS ; BRAZIL ; NEVER
    Abstract: Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract [(UADT): oral cavity, pharynx, larynx and oesophagus] have high incidence rates in some parts of South America. Alterations in the TP53 gene are common in these cancers. In our study, we have estimated the prevalence and patterns of TP53 mutations (exons 4-10) in 236 UADT tumours from South America in relation to lifestyle risk factors, such as tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. Moreover, we have conducted a pilot study of EGFR mutations (exons 18-21) in 45 tumours from the same population. TP53 mutation prevalence was high: 59% of tumours were found to carry mutant TP53. We found an association between TP53 mutations and tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. The mutation rate increased from 38% in never-smokers to 66% in current smokers (P-value for trend = 0.09). G:C 〉 T:A transversions were found only in smokers (15%). Alcohol drinkers carried more G:C 〉 A:T transitions (P = 0.08). Non-exposed individuals were more probable to carry G:C 〉 A:T transitions at CpG sites (P = 0.01 for never-smokers and P 〈 0.001 for never-drinkers). EGFR mutations were found in 4% of cases. Inactivation of TP53 by mutations is a crucial molecular event in the UADT carcinogenesis and it is closely related to exposure to lifestyle risk factors. EGFR mutations do not appear to be a common event in UADT carcinogenesis in this population
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19955396
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  • 8
  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; cohort studies ; RISK-FACTORS ; PREVALENCE ; nutrition ; GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; SPAIN ; type 2 diabetes ; LOCI ; Diabetes Mellitus ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; Epidemiologic research design ; Gene-lifestyle interaction ; POPULATION-BASED INCIDENCE
    Abstract: Studying gene-lifestyle interaction may help to identify lifestyle factors that modify genetic susceptibility and uncover genetic loci exerting important subgroup effects. Adequately powered studies with prospective, unbiased, standardised assessment of key behavioural factors for gene-lifestyle studies are lacking. This case-cohort study aims to investigate how genetic and potentially modifiable lifestyle and behavioural factors, particularly diet and physical activity, interact in their influence on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Incident cases of type 2 diabetes occurring in European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohorts between 1991 and 2007 from eight of the ten EPIC countries were ascertained and verified. Prentice-weighted Cox regression and random-effects meta-analyses were used to investigate differences in diabetes incidence by age and sex. A total of 12,403 verified incident cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 3.99 million person-years of follow-up of 340,234 EPIC participants eligible for InterAct. We defined a centre-stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals for comparative analyses. Individuals with incident diabetes who were randomly selected into the subcohort (n = 778) were included as cases in the analyses. All prevalent diabetes cases were excluded from the study. InterAct cases were followed-up for an average of 6.9 years; 49.7% were men. Mean baseline age and age at diagnosis were 55.6 and 62.5 years, mean BMI and waist circumference values were 29.4 kg/m(2) and 102.7 cm in men, and 30.1 kg/m(2) and 92.8 cm in women, respectively. Risk of type 2 diabetes increased linearly with age, with an overall HR of 1.56 (95% CI 1.48-1.64) for a 10 year age difference, adjusted for sex. A male excess in the risk of incident diabetes was consistently observed across all countries, with a pooled HR of 1.51 (95% CI 1.39-1.64), adjusted for age. InterAct is a large, well-powered, prospective study that will inform our understanding of the interplay between genes and lifestyle factors on the risk of type 2 diabetes development
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21717116
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; CELL ; human ; LUNG ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; EXPOSURE ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; PATIENT ; DNA ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; HUMANS ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MUTATION ; genetics ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; PCR ; CANCER-CELLS ; MUTATIONS ; RECRUITMENT ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; CANCER PATIENTS ; nutrition ; MULTICENTER ; lung neoplasms ; TP53 ; ADULT ; prospective studies ; PROTOONCOGENE ; HEALTHY-SUBJECTS ; INTERVAL ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; prospective ; prospective study ; healthy subjects ; female ; Male ; CANCERS ; LIQUID ; EXPOSURES ; Aged ; Middle Aged ; CANCER-DIAGNOSIS ; Genes,p53 ; Longitudinal Studies ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins ; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
    Abstract: In cancer patients, plasma often contains mutant DNA released by cancer cells. We have assessed the significance of plasma DNA mutations for subsequent cancer development in healthy subjects in a large longitudinal prospective study. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study was analyzed with a nested case-control design. Cases were nonsmokers or ex-smokers for 〉10 years and newly diagnosed with lung, bladder, or upper aerodigestive tract cancers or leukemia accrued after a median follow-up of 6.3 years. Controls were matched 2:1 for follow-up, age, sex, area of recruitment, and smoking status. KRAS2 mutations were detected by mutant-enriched PCR and sequencing (n = 1,098). TP53 mutations were detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis, and sequencing (n = 550). KRAS2 or TP53 mutations were detected in 13 of 1,098 (1.2%) and 20 of 550 (3.6%) subjects, respectively, 16 of whom developed cancer on average after 18.3 months of follow-up. Among 137 subjects who developed bladder cancer, 5 had KRAS2 mutations [odds ratio (OR), 4.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.27-14.15] and 7 had TP53 mutations (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 0.66-4.97). There was a nonsignificant trend for association between TP53 mutations and bulky adducts in lymphocyte DNA (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 0.64-12.17). This is the first report of TP53 or KRAS2 mutations in the plasma of healthy subjects in a prospective study, suggesting that KRAS2 mutation is detectable ahead of bladder cancer diagnosis. TP53 mutation may be associated with environmental exposures. These observations have implications for monitoring early steps of carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16818665
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