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  • 1
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; ANGIOGENESIS ; APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; FLK-1/KDR ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; IN-VITRO ; INHIBITOR ; INVASION ; IONIZING-RADIATION ; IRRADIATION ; proliferation ; PROTECTION ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; TUMOR-CELLS
    Abstract: In recent decades, radiation research has concentrated primarily on the cancer cell compartment. Much less is known about the effect of ionizing radiation on the endothelial cell compartment and the complex interaction between tumor cells and their microenvironment. Here we report that ionizing radiation is a potent antiangiogenic agent that inhibits endothelial cell survival, proliferation, tube formation and invasion. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor were able to reduce the radiosensitivity of endothelial cells. Yet, it is also found that radiation induces angiogenic factor production by tumor cells that can be abrogated by the addition of antiangiogenic agents. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors of Flk-1/KDR/VEGFR2, FGFR1 and PDGFRbeta, SU5416, and SU6668 enhanced the antiangiogenic effects of direct radiation of the endothelial cells. In a coculture system of PC3 prostate cancer cells and endothelial cells, isolated irradiation of the PC3 cells enhanced endothelial cell invasiveness through a Matrigel matrix, which was inhibited by SU5416 and SU6668. Furthermore, ionizing radiation up-regulated VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor in PC3 cells and VEGFR2 in endothelial cells. Together these findings suggest a radiation-inducible protective role for tumor cells in the support of their associated vasculature that may be down- regulated by coadministration of angiogenesis inhibitors., These results rationalize concurrent administration of angiogenesis inhibitors and radiotherapy in cancer treatment
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12839971
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  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; SPECTRA ; ANGIOGENESIS ; CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; IN-VITRO ; INHIBITOR ; proliferation ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; ADVANCED SOLID TUMORS ; AGENTS ; ANGIOSTATIN ; BLOOD ; carcinoma ; CELL ; CELL LUNG-CANCER ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; CLINICAL-TRIAL ; COMBINATION ; DOPPLER ; ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH-FACTOR ; evaluation ; FACTOR RECEPTOR ; Germany ; human ; IN-VIVO ; INHIBITION ; KINASE ; LUNG ; MICROSCOPY ; MICROVESSEL DENSITY ; MODEL ; MODELS ; neoplasms ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; PERFUSION ; PHASE-I ; PROSTATE ; RECOMBINANT HUMAN ENDOSTATIN ; THERAPY ; TOXICITY ; tumor growth ; TYROSINE KINASE ; VITRO ; VIVO
    Abstract: The multifaceted nature of the angiogenic process in malignant neoplasms suggests that protocols that combine antiangiogenic agents may be more effective than single-agent therapies. However it is unclear which combination of agents would be most efficacious and will have the highest degree of synergistic activity while maintaining low overall toxicity. Here we investigate the concept of combining a "direct" angiogenesis inhibitor (endostatin) with an "indirect" antiangiogenic compound [SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor]. These angiogenic agents were more effective in combination than when used alone in vitro (endothelial cell proliferation, survival, migration/invasion, and tube formation tests) and in vivo. The combination of SU5416 and low-dose endostatin further reduced tumor growth versus monotherapy in human prostate (M), lung (A459), and glioma (U87) xenograft models, and reduced functional microvessel density, tumor microcirculation, and blood perfusion as detected by intravital microscopy and contrast-enhanced Doppler ultrasound. One plausible explanation for the efficacious combination could be that, whereas SU5416 specifically inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, low-dose endostatin is able to inhibit a broader spectrum of diverse angiogenic pathways directly in the endothelium. The direct antiangiogenic agent might be able to suppress alternative angiogenic pathways up-regulated by the tumor in response to the indirect, specific pathway inhibition. For future clinical evaluation of the concept, a variety of agents with similar mechanistic properties could be tested
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14695206
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